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STARTS 



TO-DAY 



and it's Some Starter -SOME STARTLER 



Our big Summer Clearance Sale— a Yearly 
Event. 

It's a clean-up of this season's choicest of 
Suits and Overcoats that have become ONES, 
T WOS and THREES of a kind through a sea- 
son's big selling. They've lost nothing of 
their attractiveness through this. 

BUT-- 

where the prices of these Suits and Overcoats 

Were $25, $20 

you're asked to pay for them — 




$15 



WHERE- 



the former prices of Suits and Overcoats 
bore price marks of $40, $35 and $30, 
they're priced now — $20.00 

And let us say right here— there is in this 
collection of Suits and Overcoats, the sea- 
son's stars in cut of garments and novelty in 
colorings or fabrics. 

YOU MEN 

that are accustomed to paying swell tailor- 
shop prices, 

See these Overcoats and Suits— You'll buy 
two and three here— Others have, why not 
you? 



Underwear 

Medium weight Glastenbury 
Wool Underwear reduced to, 
the garment . 95 C. 

Cooper's Cotton Derby Ribbed 
Underwear reduced to, the gar- 
ment . 90 C. 

Cooper's Wool Ribbed Under- 
wear reduced to, the gar- 
ment ... $ 1 .4.0 

Heavyweight Medlicott Wool 
Underwear reduced to, the gar- 
ment $1.75 

Newton Worsted Underwear 
reduced to, the gar- 
ment . . $1.35 



Men's Shirts 



$1.00 grade, now 
$1.50 grade, now 
$2.00 grade, now 
$2.50 grade, now 
$3.00 grade, now 



$ .85 
$1.15 
$1.35 
$1.85 
$2.15 



ALFRED LILIENFELD & CO. 




The Boys* Department 
Participates in This 
Summer Clearance. 
The re's Some 
Powerfully At- 
tractive Val- 
ues in our 
Boys' Cloth- 
ingDepart- 
merit. 



THE LARGEST CLOTHING HOUSE ON 

THE PACIFIC COAST OCCUPYING 

THAT ENTIRE BUILDING 



AT THE CORNER KEARNY 
STREET AT POST 



Evening Dress Suits, 
Dinner Jacket Suits, 
Prince Albert Suits 
All Bear a Drastic 
Price Cutting. 





^ ,*&**,& 






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'**to"""«,Mrt. . 



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THIS IS WHAT HE PROMISED US 



I Y) 




AND^UITO RESORT 




Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 

Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



Jl Quiet Hotel of Unusual Excellence 

Bellevue Hotel 

Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters (^specially to Luncheons and Banquets 



H. W. WILLS, Manager 



THE GABLES HOTEL 

Open as Usual 

Rates $9.00 up. Near Boyes Springs, 
Verano Station, N. W. P. R. R. Address 

H. P. MATHEWSON 

SONOMA CITY, CALIFORNIA 



HOTEL 

POWMIM 

^WASHINGTON; 

D.C. 

[tL OF AMERICAN ID 

The Hotel Powhatan is the 
best, at the same time the new- 
est, hotel in Washington. 

Famous Pennsylvania Avenue, 
at the junction of 18th and H 
Streets, affords the site for this 
most luxurious and modern ho* 
teL 

Write for booklet with map. 
CLIFFORD M. LEWIS, Minigir 



wiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiimimlfj 



AT THE HOME, CLUB. CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

ALWAYS SATISFACTORY 

Geo. W. Caswell Co. 
530-534 Folsom St. San Francisco 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

DURING 

Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 

CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



Plan to Spend Your Vacation in 

YOS EM ITE VALLEY 



THIS YEAR 



It costs no more than many a common- 
place n sort. In Yosemlte there is nothing 
common. There is plenty to do and see. and 
rest and recreation not found elsewhere. 

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE IN THE PARK 

Auto stages will carry the visitor between 
railroad terminus and Yosemite this season, 
one of the finest auto trips in the world, 
without extra cost. 

ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER 
There are hotels, boarding camps, private 

camping— your choice at reasonable rates. 
For further information and rates, see any 

ticket agent, or address. 



YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 




HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Very Attractive Summer Rates 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Popular Prices 

Under Management of Victor Reiter 



ALP 



i; . - AIS 

CALIFORNIA vs. SWITZERLAND 



WE HAVE 



THE ALPS Rl 



GHT HERE 



Mt. Tamalpais and Muir Woods 



The Recreation 

and Play Grounds 

of San Francisco 



FARE 
EITHER TRIP 



Via Sausallto Ferry 
$ 1 .90 Market Street 



$7 ROUND TRIP TO 

Anderson Springs 

By Writing to 
ROSE E. ANDERSON 



Anderson's Springs 



Lake County, Cal 



Rendezvous of Automobilists 
HOTEL OCCIDENTAL 

SANTA ROSA 

Rates, European Plan, $1.00 per day and up. 
Garage in Connection 



tit.WI«h«d .t.ilv 10. TUO 




g*ii ra^Ki©Q@ 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 4, 1914 



No. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Franciaco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Geo. Hische, 1310 Westminster, Westminster Building. 
t ihicago. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
PRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Kates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.25. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months, $3.26. 



No, the Pioneer Mothers' statue will not look like a 

squaw. 

Louisiana is getting so dry that they want to prohibit the 

sale of the insidious near beer. 

It is an expensive result of the non-partisan election 

law that every candidate must form his own organization. 

Elections under local option in two Supervisorial dis- 
tricts of Santa Clara the other day went "wet" by considerable 
majorities. 

The Patti Social Club of Sacramento is instituted 

among other objects, "to relieve the temporary and financial 
embarrassment of any of its members." 

Mt. Lassen chickens are coming home to roost in the 

shape of scareheads in the Eastern papers describing volcanic 
horrors. It should be understood that ours is a trained vol- 
cano. 

The hayfield is the place to find statesmen. "I'd like 

to get out there with the men and help to get in the hay," said 
the Colonel. That is where the Young Republicans found their 
captain. 

"Men aspiring for political honors," says Mrs. Cami- 

netti, "used to kiss the babies; now they kiss the mothers." 
This is a picturesque figure of speech inspired by woman 
suffrage. 

The increase of insanity in Chicago is attributed by 

county court Judge Owens to the moving picture craze and 
baseball. Both amusements, he said, too severely stimulate 
the emotions. Fudge! 

Secretary Lane recently designated under the enlarged 

homestead act nearly 300,000 acres in California. This action 
was requested by thirty-five residents of the localities affected. 
The lands designated are quite widely distributed over the 
more arid portions of the State. 

A Berkeley dancing master has declared war on the 

University of California because, being a mere man, he is not 
admitted to be present at Mile. La Gai's dancing classes. "The 
women in the classes," he says, "must be so oddly dressed 
that they are ashamed of themselves." 



"How old is 5-year-old whisky?" ask the San Fran- 
cisco supervisors, and the customs house answers "four years." 
"The Chinese," says Marius Kast, purchasing agent for the 
city, "have a custom of calling their children one year old at 
birth, and evidently the same rule can be applied to whisky." 

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company has supplied 

and the Oakland city council has adopted a service unique 
among the cities of the country. It is the use of a pulmotor 
and an expert operator at any time of the day or night, for the 
victims of electric shocks, partial drowning, gas or any other 
suffocation. 

Benjamin Ide Wheeler has written this inscription for 

the statue of the Pioneer Mother : "Over rude paths beset with 
hunger and risk she pressed on toward the vision of a better 
country; to an assemblage of men busied with the perishable 
rewards of the day she brought the threefold leaven of endur- 
ing society : faith, gentleness and home with the nurture of 
children." 

Like the grape growers of California, the hop growers 

of Washington are organizing against State prohibition. "It 
is a remarkable fact," said the president of their association 
in a speech last week, "that all leading European nations in 
commerce and culture have never even considered prohibition, 
whereas Turkey, the most barbarous nation of Continental 
Europe, has always been prohibition." 

Oakland has a sort of organized E. P. E. Troy in the 

shape of a Public Utilities League, which in a rambling and 
ungrammatical appeal, with an indignant sputter demands the 
wholesale recall of the municipal administration, lock, stock 
and barrel. It is true, the officials have not long to serve, and 
recall elections are costly as well as annoying and vindictive, 
but, to be sure, the new politics are nothing if not uneasy. 

-Congressman Lafferty, a Republican from Oregon, who 

seems to have made more noise than anything else in Wash- 
ington, has been defeated for renomination, and in announcing 
his independent candidacy makes this modest statement: "It 
is my candid belief that my defeat would postpone for at 
least ten years a realization of national laws giving to the gen- 
eral public the prosperity and share of wealth produced which 
it deserves." 

Joseph S. Auerbach, author of "Essays and Miscella- 
nies," tells an anecdote of a young Irish boy who was taken 
by his teacher into a park to look at Halley's comet. "Though 
this was not to be seen, this youngster, in his enthusiasm, 
thought he had identified it when he saw the brilliant Rigel or 
Betelgeuse. He was rebuked by being told that he was point- 
ing to Orion. His surprise was evidenced by his comment: 
■Orion, is it? Well! Well! But I t'ought all the stars was 
Greeks.' " 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




E/DITORJAL, COMMENT 




A great deal of money has been 
Money for spent first and last on the Univer- 

University Buildings. sity of California. Most of this has 
come from the public purse, but 
private benefactors have been many and liberal. We believe 
the common verdict is that the funds have been wisely in- 
vested. The upkeep of the institution has mostly been main- 
tained by taxation, but it is the fact that private donors have 
supplied most of the money for the University buildings. Now 
the Alumni Association has decided that, through initiative 
proceedings the people of California should be asked to vote 
approval for a bind issue of $1,800,000 for permanent build- 
ings, and petitions to that end are in circulation. 

The permanent buildings the Alumni have decided to ask 
the State to provide for the University are a new agricultural 
building, to accommodate some of the 500 students in that rap- 
idly growing college, and to house the work of the agricultural 
experts who are yearly adding to the annual production of Cali- 
fornia farms many times the amount of this whole proposed 
bond issue ; a chemistry building — the present chemical labora- 
tories, built to accommodate three hundred students, are now 
used to teach more than two thousand; an addition to complete 
the new University library — first occupied two years ago, the 
library's storage capacity of 300,000 volumes is already over- 
taxed, and there is not room enough to hold the readers; and 
a large new class room building to replace the decrepit old fire- 
trap, North Hall. Since the students are increasing by one- 
sixth per annum, this classroom building is a most urgent need. 
Long ago the classroom facilities were exhausted, and now 
classes are meeting in cellars, attics and out-of-doors, for lack 
of proper rooms. 

According to a recent University bulletin, it is related that 
through private generosity a beginning was made some years 
ago in the erection of permanent buildings. The five build- 
ings thus far built in accordance with the Hearst plan are fire- 
proof, of the highest type in plan and construction, and unex- 
celled among university buildings anywhere in beauty, use- 
fulness and perfect suitability for their purposes. These per- 
manent buildings are the Hearst Memorial Mining Building, 
given by Mrs. Phoebe Apperson Hearst, at a cost, including 
equipment, of $700,000; the new University Library, built at 
a cost of $683,000, from money bequeathed by Charles Frank- 
lin Doe; Boalt Hall of Law, for which Mrs. Boalt gave $100,- 
000, and the lawyers of California $50,000 more; and two 
buildings built by the State: California Hall, a classroom build- 
ing which cost $271,000, and the first unit of the agricultural 
group, which cost $212,000. 

Of the total that has been spent on the campus in the past 
forty years for buildings, private generosity has given two- 
thirds; the people of California, through State support, only 
one-third. Mrs. Hearst personally has spent twice as much for 
permanent buildings for the University as has the State itself. 



The Universal 
Eight Hour Law. 



The farmers of California are or- 
ganizing broadly to fight the univer- 
sal eight hour law, which will be 
submitted as a proposition on ref- 
erendum at the coming State election. The Farmers' Protec- 
tive League, with a large membership throughout the State, has 
established headquarters at Sacramento to conduct a vigorous 



Mining at the 
World's Fair. 



campaign. Committees of one hundred — fifty men and fifty 
women — are organizing in each county to aid the league in its 
task of convincing the voters of California that the adoption 
of the proposed law, which would punish by fine and imprison- 
ment an employer who permits a person to work more than 
eight hours a day, or forty-eight hours a week, seriously would 
affect the agricultural interests of this State. 

The directors of the league are Frank B. McKevitt, presi- 
dent, and George H. Cutter, Sacramento; G. H. Hecke, Wood- 
land; O. O. Teague, Santa Paula; G. C. Pierce, Davis; L. F. 
Graham, San Jose; Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. Messrs Mc- 
Kevitt, Cutter and Hecke comprise the executive committee. 
Arthur Dunn is secretary and manager. 

The League has declared that its membership is not opposed 
either to organized or unorganized labor, but rather is in sym- 
pathy with the worker, and bases its opposition to the proposed 
law on the premise that it is an economic impossibility to 
operate farms on a basis of six days of eight hours each. The 
League emphasizes the fact that the Universal Eight Hour law 
to which it is opposed is not now on the statute books, and the 
present campaign has nothing whatever to do with any existing 
statute, such as the law regulating the hours of employment of 
women. 

3BT 
A mine in full operation, or rather 
many different kinds of mines in 
operation, will be shown at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition. The United 
States Bureau of mines has undertaken to construct in co- 
operation with the mining industry and the manufacturers of 
mining machinery, a mine beneath the floor of the Palace of 
Mines and Metallurgy. 

The success of the mine is assured through exhibits prom- 
ised, whereby typical metal and coal mining operations will be 
reproduced by full size working places in which mining 
machinery will be installed and operated. The walls of the 
mine will be covered with either ore or coal typical of the 
mine illustrated. 

The entrance to the mine will be through the Bureau of 
Mines space, and visitors will be attracted to it by given port- 
able mine lamps, and by being lowered in a very slowly mov- 
ing cage, while a panoramic effect of the strata lining a mine 
shaft will pass by them so rapidly as to produce the illusion 
of descending to a considerable depth. In case of crowds, 
these may enter by a slope. Exit will be by a slope into the 
radium booths of the Bureau of Mines, where actual radium 
emanations will be shown. 

There will be a motion picture room which visitors will pass 
in going from mine to mine. In it will be shown such great 
open workings as are not illustrated by the underground mines, 
soch as those of the Utah Copper Company and those of the 
Nevada Consolidated Company at Ely, the iron diggings at 
Hibbing, Minn., hydraulic gold mining, and the quarrying of 
building stone. 

Twice each day there will be an imaginary explosion or fire 
in some portion of the mine, announced by telephone to the 
superintendent's office in the Bureau of Mines space on the 
surface, and rescue men wearing breathing apparatus will en- 
ter the mine and bring out supposed victims, who will be given 
first aid treatment in the surface emergency hospital. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



The National forest service has 
Annual Const. mi riON compiled statistics to show how the 
Of Wood. lumber produced in this country is 

utilized. About 45 billion feet of 
lumber of all kinds is the annual production in the United 
States; of this, nearly 25 billion feet, board measure, are 
further manufactured, the other portion remaining for rough 
construction lumber and for similar purposes. This is exclu- 
sive of material which reaches its final use in the form of 
fuel, railroad ties, posts, poles, pulpwood, cooperage, wood 
distillates and the barks and extracts demanded by the tanning 
industry. 

Nearly, or quite 100 different woods, are used in this country 
under their own names, while an unknown number find their 
way to shops and factories without being identified or sepa- 
rately listed, except under general names. In quantity the 
soft woods, the needle-leaf or coniferous trees, are most im- 
portant, but there are a great number of species among the 
hardwoods, or broadleaf trees. Yellow pine comes first, with 
more than 8 billion feet, followed by white pine with 3 billion, 
and Douglas fir with a little more than 2 billion. It should be 
understood, however, that the term "yellow pine" includes 
several species, the three most important of which are long- 
leaf, shortleaf and loblolly. Oak, including all species, has 
nearly 2 billion feet, and is the most important hardwood. 
Maple comes next. 

More than one-half of the total consumption consists of 
planing mill products, the largest items of which are flooring, 
siding, ceiling and finishing. The next industry, in point of 
quantity of wood used, is the manufacture of boxes and crates. 
Nearly four times as much wood is demanded by makers of 
boxes and crates as by the builders of steam and electric cars, 
which come next, and five-fold the amount that goes into fur- 
niture, which in turn leads vehicle manufacture. Vehicles 
demand surprisingly large supplies of wood, and much of it 
must be of a high class in order to meet requirements for 
frames, gears and bodies. 

Chairs, listed separately from furniture, come after novel- 
ties and supplies for dairymen, poultry keepers and apiarists, 
and just before handles and musical instruments. About mid- 
way down the list come pumps and wood pipes. Among the 
products important enough to list separately are canes and 
umbrella sticks, brooms, firearms, artificial limbs and tobacco 
pipes. 



Growth of the 
Cement Industry 



California ranks third among the 
States as a producer of cement, and 
the industry has grown rapidly ever 
since William J. Dingee, some 25 
years ago installed the Standard Mill, which was the first suc- 
cessful plant of the kind in this State. Last year was a record 
breaker in this industry, according to Ernest F. Burchard, of 
the United State Geological Survey. The total quantity of 
Portland, natural and puzzolan cement produced in the United 
States last year was the greatest in the history of the cement 
industry, amounting to 92,949,102 barrels, valued at $93,001,- 
169, compared with 83,351,191 barrels, valued at $67,461,513, 
in 1912. 

The total production of Portland cement in 1913 as reported 
to the Geological Survey, was 92,097,131 barrels, valued at 
$92,557,617; the production for 1912 was 82,438,096 barrels, 
valued at $67,016,928. The quantity of Portland cement pro- 
duced, 92,097,131 barrels, is equivalent to 15,623,620 long tons. 
Compared with the production of pig iron for 1913, which was 
30,966,301 long tons, the Portland cement production is nearly 
50.5 per cent of the quantity of pig iron. 



Of the 113 producing plants in the United States in 1913, 
twenty-three were in the State of Pennsylvania, whose output 
was 28,701,845 barrels of Portland cement, the largest quantity 
produced by any one State. The second greatest production 
came from Indiana, with 10,872,574 barrels, and California was 
third, with 6,159,182 barrels. 

The natural cement produced in the United States in 1913 
amounted to 744,658 barrels of 265 pounds each, valued at 
$345,889, compared with an output of 821,231 barrels, valued at 
$367,222, in 1912, a decrease in 1913 of 76,573 barrels and of 
$21,333 in value. Puzzolan cement was manufactured in 1913 
at three plants in the United States, in Alabama, Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. The output of puzzolan and Collos cements in 
1913 was 107,313 barrels, valued at $97,663, compared with 
91,864 barrels, valued ta $77,363 in 1912, an increase in quan- 
tity of 15,449 barrels and in value of $20,300. The United 
States has a comparatively small export trade in cement. In 
1913 the total quantity exported was only 2,964,358 barrels, 
most of which was Portland cement, valued at $4,270,666, 
compared with 4,215,232 barrels, valued at $6,160,341, in 1912. 

W 

A dozen years ago there was no 
Diversified Uses of market in .California for electric 

Electricity in California, current outside of the cities. 

Nowadays, one learns from the 
annual report of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company, that 
current is being supplied to no less than 115 types of industries 
in the fields of agriculture, mining, manufacturing and trans- 
portation. Eleven electric railway systems, operating 594 
miles of road, derive their power from the company's plants. 
The connected load on the entire system increased by 56,108 
horsepower in 1913, and the already high load factor rose from 
58.6 per cent to 59 per cent. 

The development of the vast agricultural areas of the State 
is being effectively aided by the use of electric power for ir- 
rigation, reclamation, the operation of farm machinery, etc. 
The company's gross earnings from this source have, within a 
few years, risen from practically nothing to $419,092 in 1913, 
an increase within the year of $223,209, or 114 per cent. 

With the object of unifying the work of the inspectors 

and the laboratories under the food and drugs act, the United 
States has been divided into three inspection districts, the 
western district, the central district and the eastern district, 
each of which will be in charge of a chief of the district, who 
will have immediate supervision of the work of both the inspec- 
tors and laboratories in his district. Heretofore the inspectors 
and the laboratories worked independently of each other, the 
inspectors reporting directly to the chief inspector at Wash- 
ington and the laboratories reporting to the chief chemist. In 
this way the headquarters at Washington was the only co-oper- 
ating link between the inspection service and the food and 
drugs investigating laboratories. The western district includes 
the laboratories at San Francisco, Seattle, Denver and Hono- 
lulu. 

3B- 

■ One learns with amusement that Professor John W. Gil- 
more, of the Department of Agronomy at the University, is 
conducting a unique experiment of protecting the barley fields 
of the University from marauding birds with electric bells. 
Professor Gilmore, who originated the scheme, has pronounced 
the first trial a success, and sees no reason why the grain fields 
of the future should not grow undisturbed, to the accompani- 
ment of peals, clangs and buzzes. The ingenious professor will 
shortly find the birds roosting on his clockwork scarecrow. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

The Laws Delay — Playing a Game — The Spring Valley Water Litigation —The Jones 

County Calf and the Stockton Mule — Penny in the Slot Technicalities— O'Melveny's Ready 

Solution —How Lawyers Dominate Our Politics — A Form of Disguised Bribery 



BY EDWARD 

Speaking from his experience on the San Francisco bench, 
Judge Dunne the other day characterized the administration of 
justice in this State as a game. "The attorney for the defense," 
said the court, "and the district attorney are the players, de- 
fendant, the pawn and the judge the umpire. If a conviction 
be secured and an appeal taken, it is decided not upon the 
guilt or innocence of the prisoner, but upon whether or not 
some rule of the game has been violated. In other words, we 
are becoming lost in a maze of technicality." 

These things have been said before, although not from the 
bench. In politics and in law the lawyers ride the common- 
wealth like a night hag. Consider for an instant the signifi- 
cance in present status of the proceedings to condemn the 
Spring Valley Water plant for the city. All parties interested, 
lawyers and laymen on both sides, are so much appalled by 
the portentous complications involved and prospective in a 
lawsuit of this magnitude and general character that they are 
seeking some common sense alternative compromise. They 
realize that by the time the condemnation suit shall come to 
judgment the present generation will have joined the majority. 
In fine, litigation has been so cluttered with technicalities that 
no man in his senses will go to law if it can possibly be 
avoided. 

"8 "S Br 

Wanted to be Excused. 

Take the apparently simple matter of selecting a jury, and 
consider how the courts have permitted lawyers to complicate 
the proceedings. The late Dan Baker, editor of the Santa 
Ana Standard, once wrote an amusing satire explaining the 
numerous grounds on which he should be excused from jury 
service, and it ran: 

"We have been notified that we are selected as a jury- 
man in this county, and summoned to appear before the 
Superior Court to fill the bill. Oh, yes, we'll appear. We 
never sat upon but one jury in our life, and that was in 
Montana, twenty-seven years ago. We hung the fellow 
next morning at 10 o'clock. We have retired from the jury 
business ever since. We are incompetent in every respect. 
We are a Democrat, an infidel and a free thinker. We are 
an intelligent man, and don't believe in religion or an oath, 
only when we swear at a blundering printer. We are a 
chronic invalid, and have been insane since we were born. 
Our moral character is such that we can't do justice to a 
scoundrel, and believe that most men are built that way. 
We are prejudiced against every man who goes to law, 
and have expressed our opinion upon every case and ques- 
tion pending before the court, or liable to come before it 
for the next ten years. We are not competent, from age, 
politics, religion, or faith in human veracity. The best 
thing the court can do is to excuse us." 
& S ~8 

The Truth in Jest. 

The recital is funny until we begin to reflect that every sev- 
eral one of these grounds have been accepted or alleged by 
lawyers to excuse men from jury service. Whether they were 
allowed or disallowed, lawyers have been given by the courts 
the fullest liberty to waste time in making such frivolous pleas. 
The trouble is, that the bench is dominated by the bar. 

Consider the celebrated Jones County calf case, of which 
this is the record: Begun in 1874; Robert Johnson, plaintiff; 
Potter, et al., defendants. Number of calves involved, four; 
estimated value, $15; years pending, sixteen; times before 
Supreme Court, four; number of jurors tried before, 114. 
About twenty different lawyers were employed on each side at 



F. CAHILL 

different times. Final verdict for plaintiff for $1,000 and 
costs (probably amounting to $6,000 or $7,000.) Aggregate 
costs, $30,000. Condition of litigants at beginning of suit, 
prosperous; condition of lawyers at beginning of suit, poor. 
Present condition of litigants, bankrupt; present condition of 
lawyers, rich. Present condition of calves, dead from old age. 
One lawyer, C. E. Wheeler, Mechanicsville, stayed with the 
case for the plaintiff from start to finish. 

V 8 V 
The Stockton Mule. 

The Jones County calf was easily outdone by the San Joa- 
quin County mule, back in the days when Tom Cunningham 
was sheriff. The keeper of this illustrious beast of heavy 
burdens dropped into the sheriff's office in Stockton to report : 
"Hello, Bob, how's the mule?" 
"First rate." 

"Still alive and eating against the writ?" 
"Yes, the mule's all right, and as lively as when I first took 
charge of him." 

"Well, I guess I had better take another receipt from you, 
Bob, to keep the sheriff's records straight," said Under Sheriff 
Long in an official talk with R. T. Scott, who chanced to drop 
into the sheriff's office recently to report that he was alive, and 
that he still recognizes the red tape which is attached to an old 
mule. Mr. Scott signed the following paper. 

"I, R. T. Scott, do hereby certify that of the two mules that 
were left in my charge by Thomas Cunningham, Sheriff of 
San Joaquin County, in 1872, and which mules I was informed 
belonged to the estate of M. Capurro, insolvent, one died in 
the year 1878. The other is still at this date alive and doing 
well, considering age and the infirmities incident thereto, the 
said mule being now, to my certain knowledge, about 30 years 
old; nevertheless, I am still holding the said mule subject to 
the orders of Thomas Cunningham, Sheriff. 
Stockton, November 14, 1890. R. T. Scott. 

The story of the mules is interesting to show how property 
can be tied up in litigation. Somewhere about 1864 M. Cap- 
urro was a well to do business man of this city, owning a fine 
team, which was engaged in hauling freight to the mountains, 
and a horse and dray, which the owner used about the city. 
Hard luck came upon the pioneer, however, and along in 1866, 
when C. C. Rynerson was sheriff, an attachment was issued 
against M. Capurro's property, and the mule team and horse 
and dray were taken in charge by the officer. 

The owner claimed a pair of mules as exempt property un- 
der a law exempting a pair of animals for a teamster, and also 
set up a claim to his horse and dray, which were the means of 
his livelihood. Then commenced a legal fight, and in a little 
while the Stockton man was forced into insolvency under the 
United States laws. He finally won in his fight for the horse 
and dray, but the pair of mules claimed as exempt for a team- 
ster were tied up in litigation, which has never been settled. 

The sheriff then in office held the animals under a writ of at- 
tachment, and when he went out of office in 1867 the mules 
were delivered to his successor, Freeman Mills. Two years 
later, Sheriff Mills gave the animals to the next sheriff, Geo. 
C. Castle, and in 1872, when Sheriff Cunningham went into 
office, the mules were given over with the books and records 
and property under attachment. 

Sheriff Cunningham placed the mules in the charge of R. T. 
Scott, as the sheriff's, and he kept the animals together until 



July 4. 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



one died in 1878. The other animal is fat and healthy, and 
promises to live to the end of the century, but not to the close 
of the litigation. 

Allowing the sheriff's keeper $3 per day, which is the limit 
fixed by law for the pay of keepers, the surviving mule is 
charged with $26,280 costs. If the mule is charged with ranch 
fees at $2 per month, the bill against the animal struggling to 
outlive the courts is $576. Adding $144 for ranch fees, charge- 
able against the one that grew tired of the law's delay and 
died, would make the bill for ranching to be collected out of 
the only property remaining, the lone mule, $720. 

5 «■ sr 
A Short Way Out. 

The late Judge O'Melveny, of the Los Angeles County 
Court, had a shrewd wit, and once, sitting in chambers, seeing 
from the piles of papers in the lawyers' hands that the first 
case was likely to be hotly contested, asked: "What is the 
amount in question?" "Two dollars," said the plaintiff's coun- 
sel. "I'll pay it," said the judge, handing over the money; 
"call the next case." He had not the patience of Sir William 
Grant, who, after listening for two days to the arguments of 
counsel as to the construction of a certain act, quietly observed 
when they had done : "That act has been repealed." 

"8 ~S S 
Millions of Words. 

In the water rate litigation between San Francisco and the 
Spring Valley Water Company, the testimony filled eighteen 
tall volumes of closely typewritten matter. The suit con- 
sumed nearly ten years before it got to its first judicial stage 
in the trial court. I believe it never got any higher up the 
judicial stepladder, and it is not unreasonable to presume that 
both sides got so weary of paying costs and dragging proceed- 
ings that they agreed to call it a draw. 

If recollection serves, the lawyers for the contending liti- 
gants both claimed to be winners under Judge Farrington's 
decision. Quien sabe. But indeed the police should be called 
in to stop a contest of that sort in the interest of humanity. 
The city and the corporation were aimlessly hammering each 
other to a condition of exhaustion with no gain in sight for 
either party. What result was accomplished by that painful 
litigation? Nothing. The status quo ante continues. 

b- o- 0" 
The Slough of Despond. 

It was told of another similar litigation involving a New 
York public service corporation that the United States Supreme 
Court gave three whole days to the 80 cent gas case, all nine 
Justices sitting from 12 to 4:30 to listen to the arguments of 
the counsel. For the Consolidated Gas Company oral argu- 
ment was made by James M. Beck, formerly Assistant United 
States Attorney-General, Charles F. Mathewson and John A. 
Garver. For the appellants, the State of New York, the City 
of New York and the Public Service Commission, oral argu- 
ment was opened by Edward B. Whitney and closed by Alton 
B. Parker, formerly Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals. 
Attorney-General Jackson in person made the intermediate 
oral argument. Separate printed briefs were submitted by the 
different counsel. The total printed record, including the 
briefs and testimony, is some 5,000 pages. If a Judge were to 
read the records and briefs at the rate of 150 pages a day. it 
would take all his time for a year. If the work of regulating 
the public-service corporations in the United States is to be 
imposed upon the United States Supreme Court, it will be im- 
possible for its Judges to hear the oral arguments and read all 
the briefs even, let alone the testimony and official records — 
allowing no time for the other business of the court, which is 
now many years behind. 



Explaining a Deadlock. 

These facts may serve to explain the deadlock that attends 
the present condemnation suit to acquire the Spring Valley 
Water plant. I believe that both sides are anxious to expedite 
the settlement of this ancient controversy, but they are equally 
afraid of the litigious monster which the perverse ingenuity of 
lawyers has created. The big lawsuits and the petty differences 
that trouble the courts are all afflicted in their degree by the 
same disease. A Los Angeles judge has been struggling with 
a "drop a nickel in the slot" problem. An ingenious and im- 
pecunious lover of tobacco read an invitation on one of the 
machines to drop a nickel in the slot and draw out a cigar. He 
accepted the invitation, but used a nickel which had a string 
attached to it. He pulled up the nickel after he had obtained 
a cigar and dropped it in again and again withdrew it. By this 
device he secured a pocketful of cigars, but was soon arrested. 
The judge, however, could not make up his mind as to any 
provision of the law to meet this case. The man had not 
committed burglary and apparently not larceny. He had sim- 
ply acted according to instructions and had met no resistance 
from the machine or its owner in the attempt to buy cigars at a 
very low rate. 

» 5 o- 
As Old as Hamlet. 

Nothing new in all this, you will say. True enough, and that 
is the devil of it. California, and indeed the whole United 
States, is seventy-five years behind the rest of the civilized 
world in their jurisprudence and administration of law by the 
courts. Have you ever read Samuel Warren's "Ten Thousand 
a Year?" That entertaining novel, written three-quarters of a 
century ago, gives a vivid and accurate account of an old fash- 
ioned lawsuit of the period when trivial technicalities were 
still permitted to afflict and govern British justice. Charles 
Dickens and Samuel Warren, by their novels, so aroused pub- 
lic sentiment in these matters that the lawyers themselves took 
up the matter of reform, and so it must be done in this country. 
The Santa Cruz News, commenting on Judge Dunne's re- 
marks above quoted, said : 

"Then what are these bar associations for? Who can 
better reform the practice of the law than the lawyers? 
The district attorneys of the State meet in convention 
every year. Who should more intelligently discern the 
faults of methods practiced by them than the district at- 
torneys themselves; and who could better suggest reme- 
dies? And the judges; if their own methods are wrong, 
why don't they change them? Why doesn't Judge Dunne 
start in by changing the methods in his own court, if they 
are wrong methods? Can't these reforms be effected 
from within just as well as from without?" 
(Continued to page 19.) 



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and California Advertiser 



July 4, 1914. 




Asiatic hordes gaze with a hungry eye on the pleasant 

pastures of America. Japan re-opens the diplomatic wrangle 
over the California alien land law, and the Hindus are knock- 
ing loudly at the door of Canada, claiming to be brother 
Britishers. A Calcutta despatch says that "in view of the fact 
that the Canadian government has extended the duration of 
the special order in council totally excluding all artisan immi- 
grants until next September, the voyage of the steamer Koma- 
gata Maru, from Hongkong to Vancouver, with six hundred 
Hindus on board, is viewed in India with the gravest apprehen- 
sion. It was the intention of those emigrants to test the valid- 
ity of the British Columbian immigration regulation existing 
prior to the trouble last December. This regulation, which in- 
sisted on a direct voyage as essential to the entry of Hindus 
into British Columbia, and was specially designed to secure 
their exclusion, was decreed to be 'ultra vires' by the Dominion 
high court. The Dominion government then issued a special 
order in council, which expired normally last March." 

Wallace Irwin's letters of a Japanese schoolboy might 

and a model in an epistle written by a Japanese husband seek- 
ing a divorce in San Jose. He wrote : "My wife has become 
to a mental deform which she could not be wiped out for her 
whole life, and subjected to such an insult as that she cannot 
face to the world again. According to my own belief, I became 
to compel, to appeal to a divorce suit to a court of California. 
It is known by many thoughtful persons that he, the great im- 
moral one, Umegichi Furuya, in his past has committed this 
kind of social crime which is not necessary to refer to each of 
them. I hereby will start for eternity to restrain him socially 
forever; and it is not only for my benefit but also for the sake 
of humanity. So I dare say these things to the public bearing 
one's shame." 

■ F. L. Baker, of San Jose, takes a somewhat unusual 

view of the uses of game birds or animals, and writes that 
"the game bird or animal killed by the market hunter is so 
much loss to the State. It is so much meat to be sold for the 
killer's profit, and for his alone. The State has been deprived 
of the attractiveness of its presence and of its value. A' State 
property has been destroyed to the sole profit of a game dealer, 
a market-hunter and a hotel keeper. A delight to the eye, an 
invitation to the open hills, an incentive to health-giving, stim- 
ulating, virile recreation to every man and woman in the State 
has been snuffed out of existence that a given few may make 
an unearned profit from his exploitation of the State's prop- 
erty." 

The administration of the State Highway Commission 

is held responsible for the automobile accident that resulted in 
the death of A. A. Moore, Jr. No warning lights were put up 
to indicate danger, and Stanley Moore, brother of the de- 
ceased, said "the road was unfinished where the accident oc- 
curred, and only a single scantling protected the burnt bridge. 
The auto, of course, crashed through. The finding of the 
Coroner's jury at Madera showed the condition. Sentiment 
down there is strong, and the people are aroused over the mis- 
hap. A grilling editorial, taking to task the State Highway 
Commission for the accident, was printed in one of the local 
papers. 



The sacred game of golf is attacked in its very citadel 

by a Britisher who calls it "the incarnation of slow-footed ego- 
tism, demanding a style of stroke which cramps and spoils 
the style demanded for real games." He concluded: "Lawn 
tennis is bad enough, but golf is entirely — there is no other 
word for it — damnable." These vials of wrath were supple- 
mented by another enemy of the royal game who wrote : 
"Chiefly by reason of the growth of national slackness, golf, 
with its indecent posturings among young women and heavy 
wagering among men, has crept upon the country like a de- 
stroying fungus." 

A San Bernardino despatch says that a number of big 

pearls, apparently all or part of a string torn from the neck of 
one of the women passengers in the Santa Fe Limited wreck 
at Bagdad over a week ago, were recovered by workmen from 
the debris of the smashed cars. Since the cars were brought 
to the railroad shops the wreckage has been guarded constantly 
to prevent the theft of the jewels. It is reported that the total 
value of the gems lost is $20,000. The woman who wears $20,- 
000 worh of jewelry on a railroad journey deserves to lose 
them. 

The Federal Department of Justice is reported to be 

more or less actively in pursuit of the cantelope trust, which 
handles the Imperial Valley product. We had supposed that 
the farmer at least was immune, in view of the unhampered 
activities of the bean trust, the raisin trust, the walnut trust, 
the citrus fruit trust, and other such organizations. The de- 
partment has a skillful cook for making fish of one trust and 
flesh of another. The concoction of immunity sauce is a 
specialty. 

The parcel post does a big business in Yosemite, greatly 

to the disgust of the contractor who carries the mails. So much 
parcel post matter is received there that it has been found 
necessary for the railroad company to run freight cars, because 
of lack of room in regular mail cars. Camp Curry, which uses 
110 dozen eggs each morning, now is shipping the eggs in by 
parcel post. A ton of potatoes were recently received there 
through the mails, and one hundred tents were among the 
items recently seen passing through the mails. 

Attention to a new feature of the election laws is drawn 

by the Angellotti campaign committee, which says: "Please 
note that according to the provisions of the direct primary law 
(statutes of 1913, page 1404, section 23), Judge Angellotti 
will, in effect, stand elected if he shall succeed in getting 'a 
majority of the total number of votes cast for all the candi- 
dates' for the office of Chief Justice at the primary election to 
be held on August 25, 1914." Of course the same rule applies 
to all other candidates for judicial office. 

Judge Welch, of the Santa Clara Superior Court, had a 

sitting the other day for the naturalization of aliens, and some 
of the applicants had strange notions of the American govern- 
ment. One man stated solemnly that Police Judge T. R. 
Dougherty made all the laws of the city of San Jose; another 
that the White House was one of the houses of Congress; an- 
other that Thomas Jefferson was the first Congress ever held 
in this country ; and still another that Washington was the 
thing that runs the United States. 

Chester Rowell resents the Bulletin's support of Heney 

for the Progressive nomination for United States Senator, 
and he delivers this nasty little sidewinder: "It ill befits the 
Bulletin, as the ostensible apostle of the people's rule, to ad- 
vocate programming a nomination on the most popular of par- 
ties, by a combination of candidates, as against the known sen- 
timent of the voters." 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PIvE>ASUR,D'S WAND 



'We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

PAUL GERSON. 



rrrr 




The Orpheum. 

The program this week is unusually good, and an 
evening spent this week at this fine house has the 
faculty of sending one away in a well satisfied mood 
— conscious that you have received your money's 
worth. Lancton, Lucier and company have the first 
assignment, and this trio contribute a lot of good, 
' clean fun. The lady is undoubtedly capable, and 
one of the men has a knockabout style which the 
audience like very much. The act "gets over" and 
registers a hit. Laddie Cliff, the English boy come- 
dian, is growing very fast, and will soon be out of 
the boy class. This much, however, is evident — 
that he is developing more cleverness as he grows 
older. His character songs are exceedingly well 
done, and his dancing is wonderful. Altogether, he 
is a splendid attraction, and always finds favor with 
his audiences. "Dainty Marie" proves to be more 
buxom than dainty. She makes a decided novelty 
of her act. Appearing first before the front drop, 
she sings a song very nicely, and then follows with 
a dance done very neatly, and then exits, only to re- 
appear on a full stage clad in fleshlings, naturally 
showing the before mentioned buxom figure to full 
advantage. We are then treated to a very remark- 
able exhibition of trapeze work, during which the 
talented lady keeps up a running fire of small talk 
and snatches of song. It is a great act, and de- 
servedly so. Do not miss it. Doris Wilson, aided 
by her two sisters and Jack Tague, present a clever 
diversion, in which the remarkable resemblance 
of the three sisters is placed to good advantage. 
The act has a certain amount of novelty and origi- 
nality about it, and is very entertaining, besides 
amusing. The Gardiner trio consists of two pretty 
girls, who are fine dancers, and a gentleman who 
can also dance well; in fact, the society dances 
which the gentleman executes with his assistants 
ar.e as good as we have ever witnessed here. The 
gentleman in particular is the personification of 
grace, in this connection easily rivaling his many 
predecessors. The dances are all decidedly pretty, 
many of the steps being new. A dainty act, done in 
a dainty manner and very enjoyable and duly ap- 
Dreciated. Everitt Shin presents his second bur- 
lesque on drama, this time his efforts being con- 
fined to a great extent to the efforts of the rural 
stage manager who runs the entire "Opry House" 
himself. The thing is excruciatingly funny, and 
creates the laughs. This is all we ask. Charles Withers, as 
the manager, does a notable piece of work. He is careful not 
to overdo his character, and his assumption of quiet dignity 
makes his role all the funnier. Henry Lewis, a German come- 
dian, introduces himself to our local audiences, and brings with 
him a style and method which are somewhat refreshing. He 
does not go about his entertaining in the conventional and 
stereotyped manner of the other German comedians. Lewis 
can do a little of almost everything, and he does it all so well 
that you want more and more of him. He is a big success. 

An educated chimpanzee winds up the performance. The 
animal in question does things which strongly savor of a 
real human mind; at least that is the impression one gains on 
seeing the many wonderful stunts which this little homely chap 
performs. If there is any missing link, surely this little ani- 
mal should supply it. He does things which more nearly ap- 
proximate human intelligence than any animal I have ever 
seen. 




Yvette, "The Whirlwind Violinist." at the Orpheum next week. 



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10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 






Elissa, in "Cabria," coming to the Gaiety. 

"His Excellency, the Governor" at the Columbia. 

This delightful and gentle satire of English Colonial life is 
being given a very adequate presentation by the splendid group 
of players brought here by Wallace Munro. This delicious 
comedy brings out even better than Oscar Wilde's play of the 
week before the latent comedy ability of the various members. 
"His Excellency, the Governor" has been seen here before 
some years ago, but never have we seen such excellent actors 
in the cast. It must be a matter of about fourteen years ago 
when I witnessed Ethel Barrymore make her official New 
York debut in this play, and I have had the pleasure of becom- 
ing acquainted with the play on other occasions, but I have 
never seen such an all-round good performance as is being 
presented by the company at the Columbia now. Captain 
Marshall, the author, understood his subject thoroughly, es- 
pecially the military feature of it. in which connection he pokes 
lots of gentle satire thrusts. We rarely nowadays see better 
or cleaner comedy. There is a smile or a laugh in almost every 
line. Charles Richman, as the Governor, gives new evidence of 
his ability as well as his versatility. He takes on the years 
and dominant authority of his character with becoming dignity, 
and his performance is altogether noteworthy. Frank King- 
don has a better opportunity this week, and shows to marked 
advantage. He is an actor of refinement and keen judgment. 

George Christie does Captain Carew, and plays him well, with 
the necessary youth and manly spirit. Charles Cherry, as 
Baverstock, the private secretary, is simply fine. The role 
fits him as if written for him, and he is to the life the stolid 
Englishman, the kind the author intended to depict. Gladys 
Hanson gives a very capable performance of Stella. Miss Han- 
son certainly improves with acquaintance. Carroll McComas is 
charming as Ethel, and is a pretty picture. Rose Coghlan is 
the English grande dame, as if to the manner born. She is a 
perfect picture every moment she is on the stage. The staging 
of the play is beautiful. The audiences are growing larger 



daily, and our people are gradually realizing what a fine or- 
ganization they have an opportunity of seeing. Next week we 
are to have a new play by a San Francisco young man who has 
already won his spurs in the East, Frank Mandel, of whom 
a great deal has been written. We shall look forward with 
expectancy to the premiere of the play. 

* * * 

Vivian Grant Presents "Tannhauser." 

Vivian Grant presented "Tannhauser" in music and pictures 
recently in Berkeley, this being the sixth of her series of musi- 
cal paintings of the Wagnerian music-dramas. A most attrac- 
tive program was arranged from the score by the young musi- 
cian. A special feature was a violin solo on the "G" string, 
and a piano solo for the left hand alone, both arranged by 
her. Orchestral coloring was obtained in several numbers dur- 
ing which the violin, organ and piano were used. The idea 
of bringing the operas before the public in this way, telling 
the story in music and pictures, is original with Miss Grant. 
She will continue the musico-pictorial recitals next season in ' 
response to numerous requests. Mrs. E. G. Grant presided at 
the organ. Mrs. Mabel Hill Redfield was accompanist. 

* * * 

Pantages. 

There is a strong bill at Pantages this week, composed of 
drama, dance and song. Some people would say that the best 
thing of the evening is done by Bob Albright, who calls himself 
the "Male Melba." His astonishing versatility of voice cap- 
tured the house, and the audience wanted a great deal more 
of him. "A Night in the Slums of Paris" is a delirious whirl 
of dance and pantomime, telling in dumb show a story which 
is thus synopsized : The story deals with the life of the notori- 
ous female Apache who, on account of her glorious golden hair, 
was known to the denizens of the Paris underworld as Casque 
d'Or (Golden Helmet.) The Baron de Vaux, a rich bachelor, 
having seen a picture of Casque d'Or in the daily papers, de- 
termines to obtain possession of the famous beauty, and makes 
a wager at his club to that effect. His efforts to obtain an 
introduction to the golden haired siren lead him into many ad- 
ventures, which include an attempt to rob him, which is frus- 
trated by Casque d'Or herself, who seals from her criminal 
lover the knife, without which the assassin of Paris is lost. 
Many interesting situations are shown in which some unique 
dances are given, including the famous "Danse du Couteau" 
(The Dance of the Dagger.) 

Another charming sketch is that of "The Village Priest," 
which is an amusing satire on the suffragette movement. Chas. 
King, as Father Donovan, illustrates some good comedy, with 
his musical brogue. George Wilson, in black face, does an 
entertaining monologue, and Romano and Carpe deliver the 
goods as street singer and harpist. A lively sketch, "Fun 
in a Music Store," is presented by Kumry, Boesch & Robinson. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Gaiety Theatre.- — The extent of the encroachments of the 
"movies" on the "legitimate" theatres is having a notable illus- 
tration in Chicago and New York, and will soon duplicate in 
San Francisco the impression created in the East and Middle 
West, when D'Annunzio's remarkable vision of the third cen- 
tury, "Cabria," is given at the Gaiety Theatre, July 11th. For 
its proper presentation, a symphonic orchestra is required, and 
a great chorus of skilled singers, whose vocalism, behind the 
screen, adds to the impressiveness of the picture. It is said 
that at the Knickerbocker, where the picture is now being dis- 
closed as well as in Chicago, it is impossible to secure seats, 
and that the spectators who were wise enough to obtain a stock 
are selling reservations, originally costing a dollar, at 100 per 
cent profit. 

* * * 

Columbia. — San Francisco is to be the scene of one of the 
earliest dramatic premiere of the season, for on Monday night, 
July 6th, at the Columbia Theatre, for the first time on any 
stage, will be seen the new and original play entitled "Trifling 
with To-Morrow." The all-star players will make their ap- 
pearance in this piece, which is from the pen of a young San 
Franciscan, Frank _Mandel, who has come to the fore during 
the past two seasons as one of the most brilliant playwrights 
of America. The play is in three acts, and there are in all 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



seven principal characters. The story deals in the main with 
a quartette of strongly drawn characters, two men and two 
women, whose lives are devoted to a cause which brings them 
into sympathetic touch with humanity and their own stories of 
love, making a profound impression, as told by the author. 
Matinees Wednesdays and Saturdays. 



Orpheum.— The Orpheum offers a particularly fascinating 
bill for next week. William A. Brady, who has joined the 
ranks of vaudeville producers, will present "Beauty is Only 
hr"kin Deep," a one-act play by Elizabeth Jordan. 

Yvette, "The Whirlwind Violinist," and a very attractive 
girl, will give a unique offering. This is the presentation of 
herself in what she calls "In a Futurist Setting." 

Dave Kramer 'and George Morton, two black-faced come- 
dians, have padded out the peculiarities of the darkey into 
a laughable fifteen minute skit. 

"The Stranger," a comedy sketch by Herbert Bashford, will 
be presented by Charles Yule, Ferd Munier & Company. 

Next week will be the last of Henry Lewis ; Doris Wilson & 
Company; The Gardiner Trio, and Everett Shinn's new "Meller 
Drammer," "Wronged from the Start." 



THE SCARED FRENCHMAN. 

Thomas Martindale, big game hunter in British Columbia 
and the Upper Yukon, whose new book, "Hunting in the Up- 
per Yukon," will be published this fall by George W. Jacobs 
& Co., was out moose calling one night. There was a lake 
three and one-half miles long and a dead water two miles in 
length above. A companion hunter was "calling" at the foot 
of the lake — north side. Martindale was "calling" on the dead 
water some four and one-half miles away from him. Each man 
succeeded in getting a bull moose down to the alder bushes, 
but could not get them to show themselves. In the meantime, 
another bull, having heard the calls from a great distance, had 
worked his way along the south side of the lake at about the 
same time that both hunters had decided that it would be best 
to go back to camp and try it again early in the morning — say 
three o'clock. This Martindale did, leaving the camp at that 
time, and after "calling," shot his moose just at daylight. His 
companion slept until breakfast and failed to get his moose at 
all, and so he went home "skunked." Now the hunters reached 
the camp that night at the self-same minute, and found their 
French Canadian cook in the highest state of excitement. 

The camp was on the south shore along which the third bull 
had been coming, following a well defined path. This trail 
led right through the camp which consisted of five tents. Al- 
fonse — the cook — was at the open fire, cooking something for 
the e'arly morning breakfast, when he heard some terrific 
grunting and the loud crashing of big antlers. As he turned 
around, there was the bull — and as he related the story of the 
first sight that he had of the angry animal, he was all in a 
tremble. Said he : "I quick look 'round, I see ze biga-biga 
moose, come right up to me, he shake his head and roar. I 
quick run to ze water. I say to him: 'You damn fool, you go 
way, I not make ze call. I not make it, you hear. Martindale 
he make him ze call,' but he come all ze time to me. I jump 
the canoe, I quick paddle out. Ze moose he still come, I get 
in deep water, den he stop, shake his head, and roar at me, 
and I tell him: 'You damn fool, you go way and scare Martin- 
dale, he make ze call, not me.' Den he hear you men come, 
and he get out quick. Excuse me, I am verra much excite." 

Alfonse after that positively refused to be left alone at night, 
and one of the hunters had to take him in his canoe every night 
afterwards. 



The Railroad Commission of California has formally ap- 
proved the Pacific Gas and Electric Company's plan of finan- 
cing, as outlined in a recent letter to stockholders. The Com- 
mission's order is dated July 1st. 



"Where is the fire hottest?" inquired the beautiful lady. 

"On the next floor," said the gallant fireman. "Then maybe 
you would run up and heat these curling tongs for me. I can't 
be carried out with my hair in wisps, you know." — Seattle 
Post-Intelligencer. 



CARNATIONS. 

Carnations and my first love ! And he was seventeen 
And I was only twelve years — a stately gulf between! 
I bought them on the morning the school-dance was to be. 
To pin among my ribbons in hopes that he might see; 
And all the girls stood breathless to watch as he went thro' 
With curly crest and grand air that swept the heart from 

you! 
And why he paused at my side is more than I can know — 
The shyest of the small girls that all adored him so . . 
I said it with my prayer-times — I walked with head held 

high— 
"Carnations are your flower!" he said as he strode by. 

Carnations and my first love! The years are gone a score, 
And I recall his first name, and scarce an eyelash more; 
And those were all the love-words that either of us said — 
Perhaps he may be married — perhaps he may be dead. 
And yet ... to smell carnations, their spicy, heavy sweet 
Perfuming all some sick-room, or passing on the street . . . 
Then still the school-lights flicker and still the lancers play, 
And still the girls hold breathless the while he goes his way; 
And still my child-heart quivers in that first ecstasy — 
"Carnations are your flower!" my first love said to me! 

— Margaret Widdemer. 



MUIR WOODS EXTENSION ROAD. 

An extension of the Tamalpais railroad runs from the former 
terminus of the branch at the site of the burned Muir Woods 
Inn to a point within three minutes' walk of the floor of the val- 
ley, eliminating the former long walk. The terminus is within 
500 feet of the boundary of the National Park. The railroad 
company has a gang of carpenters and artisans at work upon 
the Muir Terminal, which is being built along the rustic lines. 




cured through me. VHEE:- 12-page 
*" ,J?°. ok - Successful Patents;" "Stepping Stones" (containing 
over 200 inventions wanted, prizes, etc.); and "Patent Promotion." 
Bendiortnem. Free manufacturing facilities. Personal Services. 
I get patent or no fee. Advice free. 

RICHARD B. OWEN. 99 Owen Bide-. Washington. D. C 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Mason and Geary Street 
Phone Franklin 150 

The Leading Playhouse 
Last Time ALL STAB PLAYERS in "His 



SUNDAY NRJHT. fULY 5th 

Excellency, the Governor." 

BEGINNING MONDAY. JULY 6th 
First Time on Any Stage 

ALL STAR PLAYE RS 
In a New Modern Play, entitled 

"TRIFLING WITH TOMORROW" 
By Frank Mandel 

"POP" PRICES AT WED. MAT SAT. MAT. SUNDAY NIGHT. 25c tO $1 
All Other Evening Performances, prices 26c to fl.50. 
Next Play "FINE FEATHERS." 



Orpheum 



O'Fairell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 
g THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON MATINEE EVERY DAY 
A WONDERFUL NEW SHOW 
WILLI \M A BRADY presents Elizabeth Ionian's one act play " BEAUTY 

IS ONLY SKIN DEEP": YVETTE "The Whirlwind Violinist": KRAMER 4 
MORTON TWO Black Dotal 'HAS. YULE, FERD MTNIER & CO. in Her- 
bert Bashford's Comed; Sketch "The Stronger "; HENRY LEWIS; DORIS 
Wll.sos .v. CO.: GARDINER TRIO; WORLD'S NEWS IN MOTION VIEWS. 
ek— Everett Shinn's New " Meller Drammer " "WRONGED from 

THE -TART." 

Evening prices. 10c. 25c. 50c. 75e. Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 

lexrept Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 50c 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



TTTT re DFSTIITB JNT MONADNOCK BUILDING 
JULiLo MtOlAURniil Opposite S. F. Chronicle 

Fish, Fresh Daily, a Feature. 
Special 50 cent Lunch. Ladies' Dining Room. 

Best $1.00 Dinner That Can Be Procured. 
JHLES WTTTMANN. Proprietor Phtne Kearny 812 



12 







rancisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



^f: 



The wedding of Miss Agnes Tillman and Baron Jan Carel 
van Pantheleon van Eck of The Hague, Tuesday night, at the 
home of the bride's parents in Washington street, was one of 
those events which gayly festoons the whole season for those 
who were fortunate enough to be there. Never has there been 
a June more loaded down with lovely flowers — every blossom 
that grows has lifted its head this year and turned all its proud 
or winsome beauty to the admiring gaze of the world that can- 
not pass by without a wondering glance at the marvel and 
beauty of it all. And samples of every flower that blooms in 
perfection were culled for that wedding. Never has there been 
a marriage ceremony against a more flowery background. Roses 
— the wondruus yellow cloth of gold variety — and American 
Beauties; gladiolas, gelly stock, Shasta daisies, Japanese lilies, 
lovely Bougainvilleas, and a dozen other blossoming hand- 
maidens of June were brought into the house and shown their 
place by the clever decorators who coordinated the beauty of 
the flowers to a general decorative scheme and gave to each 
room the flower that followed the scheme of decoration and the 
plan of the house. Such quantities and varieties of flowers 
were used that under unskillful hands the scene might have 
looked like a floral rampage, instead of the vista of beauty that 
it was. 

The bride and her attendants made a lovely picture, and one 
that crowds similar groups for first place. Certainly never has 
there been a lovelier ensemble. The wedding gown was made 
with a very long train, the approved court train for presenta- 
tion to Queen Wilhelmina, for the wedding journey will lead 
to the shining, scrubbed, tulip lined shores of Holland, where 
the groom's family watch the ancestral windmills go round 
when they have nothing more important to do. The van Ecks 
belong to the Dutch nobility, and enjoy an intimacy at court 
that many other families of similar position cannot claim, so 
the visit there will be filled with more formal functions than 
most American girls enjoy, and the trousseau has been planned 
for these events. Mrs. Duval Moore, the matron of honor, wore 
her wedding robes, and the maid of honor, Miss Marian Zeile, 
was likewise gowned in pure white, these three making a lovely 
ethereal foreground for the bridesmaids, who came floating 
after in their pale pink and blue frocks that were snatched 
from rainbows of pink and blue tulle, and made it impossible 
to describe the procession to the improvised altar as a "walk." 

One of the guests, a fellow Hollander, predicts that the 
bride, who is a very fair blonde, will surprise her new relatives 
in only one regard — and that is in her coloring, which is as 
fair as ever maiden who dried her locks under the brisk Hol- 
land sun could claim. In spite of the elimination of distances 
by travel and the consequent acquaintance of the nations with 
each other, it is marvelous and interesting how many of the 
fantastic myths still find credence among intelligent people. 
For example, here is a story that was told at the wedding sup- 
per: An Austrian nobleman married a California girl, and as 
she was of different religious faith, he did not immediately 
break the news to his aged mother. When he did write, he 
painstakingly pictured her docility, her affection, her forebear- 
ance and her desire to come to Austria and get acquainted with 
her Austrian relatives. This was the description which he 
thought would most reconcile the mother to his marriage — this, 
and the fact that the girl was an heiress to a vast land estate. 
When they arrived in Vienna, the proud Austrian mother met 
them, and at sight of the blonde American wife literally 
swooned. She had been expecting an American Indian, and 
had looked up photographs in the museum. It sounds uncon- 
vincing, but the story is absolutely authentic. The mother, 
when she found that the girl not only did not look like the pic- 
tures of the Indians in the book, but had some German ances- 
try as well as Spanish and American, felt that a mere differ- 
ence in religious belief did not matter, for she had braced her- 
self to introduce a copper-colored squaw as her daughter-in- 
law. 



The van Ecks leave in a few days for Europe, and the wed- 
ding party, including the matron of honor, the maid of honor, 
the bridesmaids, Miss Gertrude Tower of Boston, the Misses 
Ernestine McNear, Elva de Pue, Janet Coleman, Beatrice 
Nickel, Gertrude O'Brien, and the ushers, Fred Tillman, Jr., 
Duval Moore, Herbert Gallagher, Oscar Heuter, George Ly- 
man, John Young, Robert Henderson and Henry van Coenen 
Torchiana, are planning to give them a final send-off when they 
return from their brief trip for a few days hereabouts, the ex- 
act destination of which is a secret. 
© © © 

Tuesday was likewise chosen by Miss Cora Smedberg and 
Charles Norton Felton for their wedding, which was a family 
affair, and took place in St. Matthews' Church in San Mateo. 
Both the bride and groom have so many friends that the wed- 
ding had to be either a very large affair or confined strictly to 
the members of the immediate family, and they chose the lat- 
ter course, not twenty people in all witnessing the ceremony 
and sitting down to the wedding breakfast. The Felton El- 
kins came up from Santa Barbara for the ceremony, and with 
the Christian de Guignes, the William Neilsons, John Piggotts 
and Charles N. Felton, Sr., represented the groom's side of 
the family. The bride was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. 
Wm. R. Smedberg, and Miss Helen Ashton on her side of the 
family. The fact that when she obtained her marriage license 
she asked about the registration laws had been published 
broadcast, and has led some to believe that she was balancing 
up the feminist movement with matrimony, even at the license 
clerk's office. As a matter of fact, she is one of the young wo- 
men in the Burlingame set who does believe in "Votes for Wo- 
men," but she has never dynamited that belief into any more 
violent action than casting a vote at election time. It crossed 
her mind that changing her name might necessitate re-register- 
ing in order to vote, and she thought that while she was in the 
City Hall she might as well get all that sort of thing over 
with, if it was necessary to make the change. That simple lit- 
tle forethought has been despatched broadcast in headlines im- 
plying that "Society Girl Hesitates Between Marriage and 
Losing a Vote," or "Society Maiden Refuses Marriage License 
When She Learns that it is Necessary to change her Registra- 
tion as a Voter." 

S © 9 

Of course, all this is very funny to her friends, who know 
that aside from a normal, intelligent interest in public affairs 
she is in nowise affiliated with the feminist movement. There 
are a number of the socety women here who, since the suffrage 
was granted, keep themselves informed on public affairs. The 
group that includes Mrs. George Newhall, Mrs. Norris Davis, 
Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mrs. Osgood Hooker and several others who 
come up from Burlingame for the luncheon discussions of the 
San Francisco Center, likewise numbered Miss Smedberg on 
the list, and will doubtless go on including her, now that she is 
Mrs. Felton, but this excessive interest in affairs of State which 
is fastened on her by the press despatches is entirely un- 
founded. 

© © © 

Tuesday was likewise the wedding day of Miss Grace Brom- 
field and Mr. Samuel Caldwell Haver, the ceremony taking 
place at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daven- 
port Bromfield. A happy gathering of close friends and rela- 
tives toasted the health of the young people, who will make 
their home in Los Angeles, much to the regret of the bride's 
friends here. Her sister, Mrs. Arthur Judd Ryan, of New York, 
who came on to officiate as matron of honor at the ceremony, 
will remain here several weeks, and will be the motif of much 
entertaining by her friends, who are clamoring to make her 
visit a round of entertaining. 

© © © 

Alameda and Berkeley each responded to the merry sound 
of wedding bells on Tuesday, and both weddings claimed an 
interest in San Francisco, where the principals in the affairs 
are almost equally well known. Miss Alice Preston became 
the bride of Allan McGinnis at the home of her father, Wm. 
Preston, in Alameda, friends from all sides of the bay going 
over to the ceremony. In Berkeley, Miss Nora Thomas was 
married to Professor William Bray at the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Thomas, and while this wedding 
was particularly interesting to the college set, both the bride 
and groom have a circle of friends outside of the campus life. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 




SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



Mrs. Kate Waters. 



OBITUARY. 



In the passing away of Mrs. Kate Waters, California loses 
one of her foremost writers and educators. Her modesty 
alone prevented her being better known. Her career as a 
teacher covers a period of forty years, during which time she 
was always a newspaper correspondent. A tew years ago she 
severed her connection with the public schools, and devoted 
her time entirely to newspaper and literary work. Her youth- 
ful and intimate association with Edwin Booth, Dave Ander- 
son and Thomas Hann, manager of the old Metropolitan Thea- 
tre, made her a keen critic. Her whole life, outside of the 
scholastic, was in the drama, and in later years her opinions 
were quoted everywhere. The News Letter had for years the 
advantage of her unerring judgment of players. Quoting 
from the San Francisco Chronicle, the day after her death, her 
criticism in the News Letter of Henry Irving, according to 
Brams Stoker, was the only analytical resume of his work 
while here. Again to quote an authority in his line, Ambrose 
Bierce said that she was the one woman who never erred in 
knowledge of her mother tongue. A synonym was unknown to 
her. She had but one word befitting to express her meaning. 
In her private life it has been often said that her hand was ex- 
tended to any street sweeper with the same graciousness given 
a silk hatted attorney who had once been her pupil. A broad, 
kindly nature, who made no distinctions of caste. Her obse- 
quies, on Saturday last, attested to the widespread love which 
she inspired in all. Her pall bearers, representing the school 
department, were Alfred Roncovieri. Superintendent of Public 
Instruction. Of the dramatic, J. J. Gottlob, of the Columbia 
Theatre. The press, Fred Marriott, Jr., of the News Letter. 
The remaining old time friends who served were John J. Deane, 
brother-in-law of the widow of the late William A. Deane. 
daughter of the deceased; George Jost, Noah Brandt. Nelson 
Doolittle. 



JAMES KEANE ACADEMY 

of Motion Picture Acting 

at the UNITED KEANOGRAPH FILM MANU- 
FACTURING CO., Studios— Fairfax, Marin County. 



1 hour from 
San Francisco, 
Telephone San 
Rafael 8 7 0- 
The finest mo- 
tion picture 
studio in the 
west where re- 
fined students 
will be given 
practical stage 
and acting ex- 
perience before 
the ca mera. 
Write for a 
booklet. 




H 



ITCHCOCK 
MILITARY 

ACADEM 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

Summer Camp Now Open 

For Information Write to Principals, 



Y 



REX W. SHERER and 
S. J. HALLEY 



The Beringer Conservatory of Music 

926 Pierce Street near McAllister Street 
PHONE WEST 7893 SAN FRANCISCO 

Directors: Joseph Beringer (Concert Pianist) 
Mme. Jos. Beringer (Concert Contralto) 

Thorough education in Pianoforte Playing and Singing. 
Special departments for beginners, amateurs and 
professionals. Pupils prepared for the operatic and 
concert stage. Opportunities given to advanced piano 
and vocal students to join the well known Beringer 
Musical Club for public appearances. 



MiSS Harker'S School California 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits 
to Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith 
and Mills. Intermediate and primary departments. 
Great attention given to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home 
Economics. Special nurse for younger children. 
Ninth year. Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 CALIFORNIA STREET 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 

Sketching 
Painting 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO. CALIFORNIA 

Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men for entrance 
to the universities. The location, adjacent to Stanford Univer- 
sity and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes 
possible a school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 
The next semester begins August 25, 1914-. For catalogue 
and specific information, address 

W. A. SHEDD. Head Master 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




■ ■ — 



SOCHIr PERSOMHL ITEMS 




ENGAGEMENTS. 
DOBLE-WELDGN.— Air. and Mrs. Robert McFarland Doble of Denver 
are announcing the 1 engagement of their daughter. Miss Margaret 
Doble. and Charles Harold Weldon of this city. Miss Doble is a 
Charming girl, who passed a great part of last winter here as the 
house guest of her uncle and aunt. Mr. and Mrs. William A. Doble. 
who came here not long ago from Denver and built a beautiful home 
on Sea Cliff. Her fiance is one of the enterprising young business 
men of this oily. No definite date lias as yet been set for the wed- 
ding. 

WEDDINGS. 
BROMFIELD-HAVER.— Miss Grace Bromfield became the wife of Mr. 
Samuel Caldwell Haver Tuesday at the home of the bride's parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Davenport Bromfield. The Rev. William A. Brewer offi- 
ciated. Mrs. Arthur Judd Ryan, sister of the bride, came from New 
York to be matron of honor. Mr. Haver is the son of Mr and Mis. 
Samuel C. Haver, of Redlands. He is a Stanford graduate, and is in 
business in Los Angeles, where the yuny cnipli' will reside. 
BRYANT-PRATES. — A pretty wedding iast week was that of Miss 
Lucille Bryant and George Harrison Frates on Wednesday evening at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Bryant, in 
Ninth avenue. The Rev. Sidney Wilcox officiated. The bride was at- 
tended by Mrs. Erie Bryant, a sister-in-law. while Elwood Frates. 
brother of the bridegroom, acted as best man. The bride was given 
away by her father. The ceremony was followed by a wedding sup- 
per, to which a few close friends and relatives were invited. They 
left immediately for a honeymoon in the southern part of the State. 
and will make their home in this city. Mr. Frates is a graduate 
of the University of California School of Pharmacy and is manager 
uf the Sutter-street store of Goericke & Runyon. He is a brother of 
Dr. Frank Frates, well known local physician. Albert W. Bryant, 
father of the bride, is a wealthy contractor. 
KLLERY-RUXYiiX.- Miss Ethel May Ellery and Mr. Stanley Tilden 
Runyon were married at Grace Pro-Cathedral last AYednesday. The 
bride is the daughter of Mr. W. G. Ellery, and is known well on both 
sides of the bay. Mr. Runyon is a son of Albert J. Runyon, one of 
the wealthy ranchers of Sacramento County. Miss Ruth Curtaz 
and Miss Evelyn Feader were the bride's attendants, and F. T. Mar- 
tin and Frederick Moller stood up with Mr. Runyon. 
GTEALAIER-BOXXEFIELD.— Miss Anna Sophia Guemmer and Mr. 
Frank Alva Bonnefield. chief engineer of the IT. S. S. Alert, were 
married at Mare Island on last Wednesday evening, the Rev. W. S. 
Mathews, of the Episcopal Church, officiating, the ceremony taking 
place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Hilaire. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bonnefield will live at Honolulu after the first of September. 
KNICKERBOCKER-NELSON.— Miss Alice Thain Knickerbocker, daughter 
of Air. and Mrs. Calvin Knickerbocker, and Mr. George R. Nelson 
were married Tuesday night at the home of the bride, the Rev. 
Dr. Sibley, of Calvary Presbyterian Church, officiating. Mrs. F. C. 
Drew and Mis. Alervin Wessenberg. at whose weddings Aliss Knicker- 
bocker was bridesmaid, attended her during the ceremony. Mr. Nel- 
son is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Fernando Nelson. The Nelson and the 
Knickerbocker families are old residents of San Francisco, for de- 
cades identified with affairs here. 
KIXGSTON-MONOGHAN.— St. Brigid's Church. A'an Ness avenue and 
Broadway, was the scene of a pretty wedding on last Wednesday 
evening, when Miss Mae Loretta Kingston became the bride of Geo. 
I >. Monoghan, a young business man of this city. The bride, an ac- 
complished musician, is the charming daughter of Mrs. Mary King- 
ston and a prominent member of-the Entre Nous and other cotillions. 
Miss Anna Kingston attended her sister as maid of honor. The other 
attendants were the Misses Helen and Marguerite Kingston and Jea- 
nette Turner, cousins of the bride. 
LEVIN- SILVERMAN. — A pretty wedding was celebrated last week at 
California Club Hall, when Miss Ruth Levin, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Julius Levin, became the bride of Harry Silverman. Jr. 
LENNON-McKEON. — At a quiet wedding in St. Dominic's Church last 
week. Miss Sue Lennon became the bride of Terry McKeon. Miss 
Anna Cunningham was bridesmaid, while the groom was attended by 
Frank Kenny. Immediately after the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Mc- 
Keon went South for a brief wedding trip. On their return they will 
make their home in Alameda. 
PRESTON-MAGINIS.— Aliss Alice Grace Preston became the bride of Alan 
W. Maginis on the evening of Tuesday. June 30th. the marriage 
ceremony taking place at the residence of the bride's father, Wm. 
Preston, in Alameda, and was performed by Rev. Father T. L. O'Neill 
of Newman Hall, Berkeley. The bride-elect is well known both in 
Alameda and Southern California, where the Prestons have divided 
their time for many years. 
SMEDBERG-FELTON.— Miss Cora Smedberg became the bride of Chas. 
N. Felton. Jr.. Tuesday at 5 o'clock at the home of Airs. William R. 
Smedberg in Pacific avenue. After a honeymoon in Southern Cali- 
fornia; Mr. and Mrs. Felton will live in Menlo Park, where the former 
has a beautiful country home. Miss Smedberg is the daughter of the 
late Colonel William R. Smedberg, and is one of the cleverest ba< he- 
lor girls in the smart set. 



TILLMANN-VAN ECK.— At one of the most beautifully appointed func- 
tions of the year. Miss Agnes Lilly Tillmann. the only daughter of 
Air. and Mrs. Frederick Tillmann, Jr.. Tuesday evening at 9 o'clock 
became the wife of Baron Jan Carel van Pantheleon van Eck. at the 
Tillmann home in Washington street. Right Reverend Wm. Ford 
Nichols officiated. As Miss Tillmann. Baroness van Eck has been 
one of the most popular girls in the ultra-smart set. She was a mem- 
ber of the Gaiety, and also of a number of exclusive bridge and lunch- 
eon clubs. Baron van Eck comes of an old Holland family, and has 
been out here for the last two years as manager of one of the large 
oil corporations backed by Dutch capital. He is a member of the 
Pacific-Union Club, where he has made his home. Baron and 
Bareness van l<>k left Wednesday for Europe, to he gone a«jout three 
months. 
WAGXER-DE OJEDA. — At a pretty home wedding at the residence of 
the groom's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Francisco de Ojeda, on Fifth ave- 
nue. Miss Marion Wagner Wednesday evening became the wife of 
Luis A. de Ojeda. The ceremony took place at 7 o'clock, and was 
performed by Father Rosetti of St, Ignatius Church, a classmate of 
the groom at college. The bride, a charming Eastern girl, came here 
with her father, C. Fred Wagner. After the ceremony the health or 
the young couple was invoked, and they departed for a. noneymoon In 
the southern part of the State. The groom is the granason of a 
Spanish Marquis and a cousin of Marquis Emilio ae Ojeda. The 
bride is a graduate of Bryn Mawr. where she won many honors 
as a student. After the honeymoon the young couple will reside 
in this city. 
WOOLSEY-DODGE.— A wedding of interest to the local smart set took 
place In Santa Rosa on Wednesday, when Miss Louise Woolsey be- 
came the wife of Harold Carew Dodge. It was an elaborate church 
ceremony, with a reception at the Woolsey home afterwards. The 
bride is a sister of Mrs. Ernest Finley, Misses Ruth and Helen Wool- 
sey. and Alfred Woolsey, and is a relative of Judge and Mrs. Chas. 
Slack. The groom is a prominent New York business man, and will 
take his bride to the East to live. 
TEAS. 
SMYTH. — Mrs. Mary Smyth was hostess at one of the prettily appointed 
teas last week. Her guest of honor was Mrs. Robert Chester Foute, 
who, with Miss Augusta Foute and Miss Helen Wright, have left 
for an extended tour of the foreign world. 
LUNCHEONS. 
CHAPPELEAR.— Airs. Louise Chappelear entertained at an elaborate 
luncheon at her home at the Presidio Wednesday, making Mrs. Rich- 
mond Pearson Davis, wife of Colonel Davis, the reason for the event. 
COOPER. — One of the prettily appointed affairs of the week was the 
bridge luncheon given by Miss Dorothy Cooper at her home in Taj-lor 
street this week. The affair was in compliment to Miss Florence Orr. 
PLUMMER. — Mrs, William Plummer was hostess at an informal luncheon 
at her home in Devisadero street Tuesday, when she entertained in 
compliment to her house guest, Miss Lillian Van Dyke of Los An- 
geles, and Miss Doris Wilshire. whose engagement to Harold Plum- 
mer was recently announced. 

DINNERS. 
1 'AVIS. — Colonel and Mrs. Richmond Pearson Davis, who are being en- 
tertained a great deal prior to their departure for Washington. D. C. 
were the guests of honor at a jolly dinner this week giv»-n by their 
service friends at Fort Scott. Afterwards there was dancing at the 
Officers' Club. 
MONGELAS-KKY.— Count Albert Montgelas and Zia Bey were hosts at 
a delightful dinner party at the Palace Hotel on Saturday evening, 
when they entertained ten of their friends in compliment to Miss Con- 
stance Wilkinson. 
MURRAY. — Lieutenant and Mrs. Maxwell Murray gave a dinner at 
their quarters at Fort Scott Friday evening in compliment to Lieu- 
tenant and Mrs. C. P. Harris, who have lately come to Fort Scott 
from the arsenal at Renicia. 

DANCES. 

HOOKER. — The attractive home of the Robert Hookers in San Mateo was 

the scene of an enjoyable dancing party this week, when Mr. and 

Mrs. Hooker entertained about forty of the younger members of the 

Peninsula set in honor of the latter*s niece, Miss Elizabeth Shreve. 

. whose birthday it was. 

PICNICS. 
TILLMAN. — Mr. Frederick Tillman entertained friends at a picnic last 
Sunday which he gave near Menlo Park. The affair was in honor 
of his sister. Miss Agnes Tillman and Baron von Eck, who will be 
married Tuesday evening. 

ARRIVALS. 
CROCKER. — Mrs. Henry T. Crocker and Miss Marion Crocker have re- 
turned from Europe, where they have been traveling during the past 
six months. 
CLARK. — Captain and Mrs. Peyton E. Clark will arrive from the Philip- 
pines this week, and will be the guests of Mrs. L. G. Coldwell at the 
Cecil. 
I d'X'OAN. — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Duncan, who have been away from 

home more than a month, returned to town on Tuesday. 
EPPINGER. — Miss Ruth E. Eppinger has just returned from "an ex- 
tended trip through the northern counties. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



HALL. — Mrs. James Lowe Hall and her little daughter have arrived 

Portland, Ore., and are visiting Mr. and Mrs, A. Stuarl Baldwin In 
Presidio Tei 

HOYT. — While her husband is In Paris studying languages, Mrs. Charles 
Sherman Hoyt will come to Alameda to be with hot mother, Mrs. 
Samuel Poorman. There will be considerable entertaining In honor 
of the young matron, who was a promln et] girl here. 

JOHNSON.— Mrs. Frank s. Johnson, who has been abroad tor the last 
six months, ami her son. George Johnson, ui... is a student at Har- 
vard, returned home on Thursday, and are domiciled at the Fairmont. 

JUDA. — Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Juda and family, who have lived in New York 
ce the fire, have returned again t>i make their home in San Fran- 
cisco, and arc n..w i! ill, Hotel Normandte, Sutter and cough streets. 

VAN WINKLE. — Miss Anna Van Winkle has returned from Boston, where 
she has I I, talking post-graduate work I'm the past rear. 

DEPARTURES. 

! ARRACM. — Mr, and Mis Marshall li.nraeh have left for a motor toui 
'■I Southern California. They will stop en route at Del Monte, and 
at the Hotel Potter, Santa Barbara, returning the middle of July. 

I K OJEDA. — Mr. and Mis. Francisco de ojeda and the Misses Nadine and 
Yvonne de Ojeda left Thursday for the South, where they will travel 
leisurely for the next six weeks. 

I IE LA MONTANYA. — Mrs. Jacques de la Montanya leaves this week to 
visit Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Stoddard at their ranch at Oakdale. 

FENNIMORE. — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Fennimore left Friday for the Rus- 
sian River Country, wdiere they will be members of the house party 
to be given by Mr. and Mrs. Egbert Stone and Misses Marion and 
Dorothy Stone over the Fourth. 

FORD. — Mr. and Mrs. Alfred B. Ford and their sons, the Messrs. Geoffrey 
and Norman Ford, have gone to Brookdale to spend the summer. 

FOTJTE. — Mrs. Robert Chester Foute, Miss Augusta Foute and Miss 
Helen Wright left last week for New York en route to Europe, where 
they will spend the next six months enjoying life in -foreign lands. 

FLOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. James Flood. Miss Mary Emma Flood, Miss 
Mary and Barbara Donohoe motored down to Santa Barbara last 
Tuesday, and joined Miss Jennie Flood, who has been there for a 
week or two. 

MEIERE. — Mrs. Ernest Meiere and Misses Lloyd and Hildreth Meiere left 
Thursday for the Yosemite, where they will he for at least two 
weeks. 

MCALLISTER. — Mrs. Hall McAllister. Miss Ethel McAllister, Miss Marian 
McAllister and Otis McAllister will leave next Saturday for Alaska. 

TOBY. — Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Toby, of San Francisco, have gone to Santa 
Barbara. Mrs. Toby went by train, but Mr. Toby motored down. 

TREAT. — Mrs. Walter Treat left Thursday with Mr. and Mrs. Henry 
Morton for Del Monte, to be gone for several days. 

WHITE. — Miss Marion White left during the week for London to attend 
the congress and normal school of the Imperial Society of Dancing 
Teachers there. 

INTIMATIONS. 

COOL. — Dr. LuElla Cool, accompanied by Misses Daisy White. Beatrice 
Wing and Carrie Freeman, will spend a few days and the Fourth of 
July at her bungalow. "Casa Esperanza." at Camp Meeker. 

CROCKER. — The Peninsula set are awaiting with joy the arrival of 
the Templeton Crockers, wdio crossed mi the [mperator lust week, 
and who are on their way home. 

DRISCOLL. — Mr. and Mrs. Jere .1. DrtSCOll are passing ten days in the 

Yosemite, and will go from there to the Big Ti a before Leaving for 

home. 

PUKE OF WESTMINSTER. — It is rumored that the Duke of Westmin- 
ster is to take a house down the Peninsula when he comes to Call- 
fornla next year, lie is looking for a place that has suitable stables 
' for his polo ponies, and plans to spend several months here early in 
1915. The Duke is the richest peer in England, and has 1 u sepa- 
rated from ids wife tor several years. Mr. and Mrs. Cheev. i Cowdln 
will be among the first to entertain for the Duke, ami it was Mr. 
Cowdln who persuaded ..im to come t" San Franolsco for the polo 
tournaments. 

ELKINS. — Mr. and Mis Felton B. ESlklns came up from Santa Barbara 
Tuesday to attend ii"' wedding ol Miss Cora Smedberg and Ml 
N. Felton. 

HOOPER.— Mr. and Mis Arthur Hooper motored '" Woodslde on Friday, 
where they will be the guests ovei the Fourth of the torn 
John Hooper, at his country home there. 

HOWARD,— Mr. ami Mrs, Qeorge Howard, Sr., and their sons, Georg* 
and Henry Howard, of San Mai..., expect to go to Santa Barbara 
early this month for an indefinite st:,\ 

POPE.— Mr. and Mis Oeorge Pope, Miss Emllj Pope and the tv 

plan to motor up t" Lake Tahoe s. ...n aftei in. Fourth, remaining 
there until the 1st of August. 

SCHNEIDER.— Miss Louise Schneider, of i"-i Taylor street, Alameda, is 
spending tie- n k with her mother at Ferndale 

TOBIN.— Mr and Mrs Jos Sadoc Toblri and Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Tai- 
lor spent the week-end in Sonoma County, where they were 

of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckl 
I PHAM- Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin 1' rphiiin me at Del Monti 

diei him i.. .Mini n i le Fourth ol July festivities. 
WOODRUFF.— General C. A. Woodruff. U. S. A . retired, and M. 

ruff hue.- been spending the week in town at the Cecil. 



Visitor to the Salon — How many pictures are there? 

Attendant — More than six thousand, sir. Visitor— How fatigu- 
ing, and I have only half an hour to spend. Why don't they 
hang them end to end all along the subway track? — {.'Illus- 
tration* 



THE MEXICAN "ROYAL FAMILY." 

E. V. Stoddard, war correspondent of the New York Sun, 
writes of Mexico and the land barons who oppress the people. 
Most typical of the methods of these men is the story of the 
"Royal Family' - in Chihuahua. This family is no hereditary 
affair running back to an ancient chieftain and its founder, 
Luis Ferragas, is still alive. 

He began life as a small shopkeeper on the market place of 
Chihuahua. After a not very successful career he went into 
politics, becoming in time director of the Chihuahua mint. 
There are unpleasant stories told of his management of this 
institution, and in 1867 he was the wealthiest man in the city, 
the most powerful and the most popular. It was he who or- 
ganized the troops of Chihuahua against the adherents of 
Maximillian and defeated them. He had under him as actual 
leaders of the soldiery many men who have since become fam- 
ous, Felix Diaz among others. This victory of Terrazas en- 
abled Juarez to return from practical exile on the border and 
set up his government within Mexican territory. Terrazas was 
rewarded by immense popularity and by grants of land. In- 
deed, from the time a kinsman defeated the Apaches so se- 
verely as to put an end to their raiding until the present revo- 
lutions, Terrazas had been getting possession of land. His 
methods were various; he controlled the courts and held the 
only accurate surveys of the State, made for him by German 
engineers, with the result that his methods were usually legiti- 
mate. However this may be, they were such as to cause an 
armed revolt in one district by those he had dispossessed, a re- 
volt that needed the service of the rurales before the inhabi- 
tants could be made to give up the farms their fathers had 
held. As well as I could, in the disturbed conditions, I inves- 
ticated some of the cases in which the Mexican peon had been 
dispossessed of his land, and the usual procedure was some- 
thing like this: Terrazas would get possession of land contigu- 
ous to the piece he wanted, and would lay claim to it under 
some deed. The possessor could show as a rule no deed, or 
exceedingly indefinite one which would not stand before the 
carefully drawn documents and accurate surveys of his ad- 
versary. All he would be able to prove was possession, which 
counts for little or nothing in Mexican law. 

In many cases, threats were used to make the peon abandon 
his land. 

Terrazas was not alone in his system of spoliation. All the 
men who could by reason of their power or position, did the 
same thing, and the gang with their dependents, the supporters 
of the Diaz government, came to be called "Cientificos," be- 
cause of their scientific methods of obtaining wealth. The 
party and the word which stands for it has become so univer- 
sally hated that the suspicion of being in sympathy with the 
Cientificos, a suspicion founded only on the fact that govern- 
ment employees were among the members and that some of 
the "Royal Family" contributed to its support, threatens to 
ruin the Chihuahua Y. M. C. A. 

Hate is the strongest motive or emotion of the Mexican. 

The other branch of the "Royal Family" is personified in 
Enrique C. Creel, son of Reuben Creel, a sometime American 
concul who married Paz Quilty, sister of Terrazas' wife. Creel 
became enormously wealthy, and by adding the element of 
making business and banking part of the scientific scheme, 
added greatly to the wealth of the other members of the party 
as well as to his own. He has been minister to the United 
States, and was by many looked on as Diaz' successor. By 
controlling the banks — but there is no need of going into de- 
tails of what control of the money supply means. 

What the efforts of Terrazas have accomplished is shown by 
his land holdings. At the time of the outbreak of the Madero 
revolution, "Old Don Luis," as he is called, owned in his own 
right some ten million acres of the best land in Chihuahua. 

"I suppose John is still taking life easy?" said the wo- 
man in the tram. "Yes," answered the woman who was carry- 
ing a bundle of clothes; "John has only got two regrets in life. 
One is that he has to wake up and eat, and the other is that 
he has to give up eating to sleep." — Pearson's Weekly. 

Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



BANK OF 
NEW SOUTH WALES 



{ESTABLISHED IS17) 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 

Actrreente Assets 30ih 
September, 1913 




- $17,500,000 

11,750,000 

- 17,500,000 
. $46,750,000 

$236,841,080.26 



J. RUSSELL FRENCH, General Manager 



380 BRANCHES and AfiENCIES in the Australia States. New Zealand. 
Fiji Papua I Now Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every 
description of Australian Banking Business. Wool and Produce Credits 
Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THRE\DN1 ERLE STREET. E. C. 



^V 



ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 




I Paid-Up Capital 
V Surplus and U»d 

*• TmHiI Hi - 



SAN FRANCISCO 

84.000.000 

Ml Profits 31,600,000 

MO, ,000 



office; 
hkrbkrt pi.eishhacl 

I L SIO GrtEENERAUM CI. 
I WASHINGTON DODGE 



FRIH-LANDER 
I F HUNT 
R ALTSCHI.'l. 
C R PARKER 
WH. H, BIOS 
H CHOYNSKI 
G. R KURDICK 
A. 1. LANUER.MaN 



OFFICERS: 

ACKER Pr.-»iilcri. 

airman of Die Board 

Vice-President 

Yico- President 

Vice-Prnldant 

Cashfw 

A--ist;iut t'niliicr 

AjbIbUIIi C»»hier 

AsHistunt Cashier 
Assistant Cfialiier 



'I'tfll 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

HIAD OFFICE. TORONTO ESTABLISHED 18*7 

SIR EDMUND WALKER O.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L. Paid-up Capital $15,000,01)0 

ALEXANDER LAIRD Cener.^n.^ *™™ ^ JSSSSH 

JOHN A1RD Assistant General Manager Aggregate Resource 260,000,000 

TRAVELLERS" CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way In which to carry money when traveling. They are Is- 
sued in denominations of 



$10 



$20 



$50 



AND 



$100 



and the exact amount payable In Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while In other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Hembar of the Associtted Saviofs Banks •( San Francisco 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEP0SI rS ONLY: 

MISSION BRANCH S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH S. W. Cor. Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH S. W. Cor. Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1914 

Assets $ 58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

OFFICE HOURS: 10 o'clock A.M. to 3 o'clock P. M.. except Saturdaya to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 
For the 6 months ending June 30th, 1914, a 
dividend to depositors of 4% per annum was declared. 



Telephone Kearny 1461 Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connectiona With All Railroads 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




lINtSVMCEi 




The term "dividend" in life insurance has a very different 
meaning than as used in other lines of business. The dividend 
of a bank or railroad is the share of profit resulting from the 
transaction of the business. It is something over and above 
the capital invested. As used in life insurance, a dividend is 
not in any sense a profit, but simply the return of the unused 
portion of the original investment. It is the return to the 
policyholder of an overpayment, the amount of which depends 
almost entirely upon the care and economy shown in the man- 
agement of the business. This business consists of the collec- 
tion of funds, the selection and insurance of risks, and the 
investment of the sinking fund or reserve for the payment of 

losses. 

* « » 

The fifth annual convention of the International Claim As- 
sociation will be held at the Hotel Chamberlin, Old Point Com- 
fort, Va., September 16th, 17th and 18th, 1914. The Inter- 
national Claim Association, composed of the claim managers 
of the health and accident companies, is now one of the largest 
of the national insurance organizations, comprising in its mem- 
bership over seventy companies. Its meetings in the past have 
been largely attended, and effective results have been accom- 
plished. An interesting program for the 1914 convention is 
now being prepared, which will include papers and discussions 
on many of the questions and troublesome problems with which 

the health and accident companies have to deal. 

* * • 

City Engineer O'Shaughnessy reports that the quantity of 
water in Lake Pilarcitos, Chrystal Springs and San Andreas, 
amounts to 19,000,000,000 gallons, or 3,000,000,000 gallons 
more in the three reservoirs than at this time last year. 
At the present rate of progress, it will require four and a half 
years to complete the Calaveras dam. He adds that there is 
pressing need for larger pipe to carry water to San Francisco 
from the Spring Valley's Alameda County sources of supply. 
The installation of this pipe should begin at once, as it will 
require eighteen months or more, and without it a larger sup- 
ply from across the bay cannot be had. 

* * * 

Manager Sam B. Stoy, of the London and Lancashire Guar- 
antee and Accident's Pacific department, has appointed S. F. 
Norwood, who has been in charge of the claims department, to 
the position of local secretary, in recognition of his wide ex- 
perience and long connection with the office. Mr. Norwood 
began with the Maryland Casualty, at the Baltimore office. He 
succeeds J. Collins Lee, who goes to Hartford to connect him- 
self with the surety department of the Hartford Accident and 

Indemnity Company. 

* * • 

V. P. Sessions, who has represented the companies in the C. 
H. Ward general agency during the past two years, resigned 
on July 1st, and will make another connection. Special Agent 
Roy H. Davis, who has been doing field work for the agency in 
Southern California, will, after July, cover the entire State. 
Albert Schneider, in charge of the loss department at the San 
Francisco office, will resign on July 1st, to accept a position 

with the German Savings and Loan Society. 

* * * 

On June 25th, the body of George E. Simonton, manager of 
the Rocky Mountain Fire Association, was discovered at Den- 
ver, dead by poisoning. Poor health and mental trouble led 
to the suicide. He was well known and generally liked, and 

his death was a severe shock to the underwriting fraternity. 

* • • 

Sidney E. DeLong has been appointed special agent for the 
Northwestern National, covering Western Washington. He was 
formerly special agent for the North Coast Fire of Seattle, and 
more recently covered the Pacific field for the Pacific States 
Fire. Mr. DeLong succeeds R. C. Allen. His headquarters 
will be at Spokane. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



A delegation of members of the Colorado Pond of the Blue 
Goose will go to Salt Lake on July 25th to install a pond at that 
place. Delegates from other ponds in the Northwest are also 
expected to be present. The work will be followed by a ban- 
quet. Thomas S. Heath is chairman of arrangements. 

* * * 

Suit has been filed by the Pacific Mutual Life in the United 
States District Court of Los Angeles, for the recovery from 
the Federal government of fifteen hundred dollars paid as ex- 
cess taxes on dividends to the company's policyholders during 
the years 1910 to 1913 inclusive. The company gave its third 

million dollar dinner this week at Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Farm rates throughout California have been advanced to the 
figures prevailing three years ago, when they were reduced to 
meet non-board competition. Experience during that time ex- 
hibits a loss ratio of eighty per cent. 

* * » 

A. L. Merritt, who until recently covered Lower California 
for the Westchester, has engaged to do special work in the same 
territory for the Rhode Island. 

* * • 

Edgar S. Wilson, manager of the Fireman's Fund's south- 
eastern department, died suddenly at Macon, Georgia, Tuesday 
afternoon. 

* * * 

J. A. Bergen has been appointed metropolitan manager at 

San Francisco of the American of Newark, succeeding William 

Hackmaier. 

» » * 

Special Agent Morrison, of the Hoadley general agency, has 
patented a system of insurance maps originated on the card 
system, which promises to revolutionize the present, or San- 
born system. 



A most successful informal dansant took place at Te- 

chau Tavern last Wednesday. On this occasion there was no 
dancing contest, but the management presented three of the 
lady guests with costly gifts from the collection recently pur- 
chased by the management from the well known art dealers, 
S. & G. Gump Co. These informal dansants, several of which 
have been held at the Tavern in the last few weeks, have 
proved most delightful, and are looked forward to with pleas- 
ant anticipation. Judge Shortall pleased everybody with his 
fair decisions at the recent Su"pper Dance held at the Tavern, 
when he officiated in the distribution of prizes for the dancing, 
contest. He was very ably assisted by Supervisor Hilmer and 
Mr. Rutherford Cohn. Mr. Cohn is a very finished dancer 
himself, and received the second award at a previous dancing 
contest held at the Tavern. 



The "Emporium" handles "Old Forester" whisky. Sold 

in glass only. Direct from distillery to you. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 17 H 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 
W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S-, Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul 
tatlon hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street 
Telephone West 1039. 

ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-l>aw, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel, Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street . 
removes coins entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
growing nails cured bv a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg., 830 Market St. Tel Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aroniohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St, above Rurh. San Fran 
"Isco. Cal. Phone Douglas 801. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hlbernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Member of the ' 

the r* \- nnutn on ,l : 

July l. l!'l l in Irawn wilt I 

• i 
1914 R M 

Office— Corner Markel \ 



1863 19 14 . 

FIFTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 



Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams. Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels, Automobile, Burglary. Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance. Fidelity and Suroty Bonds. 

T. L. Miller. President; L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident an 
Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco 



The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 



OF HARTFORD 

CHARTERED 1850 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

The Insurance Exchange, San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager Guy Francis, Asst. Manager 

Geo. E. Billings Roy C. Ward Geo. B. Dinsmore J. C. Meussdorffer Jomes W. De«n 

GEO. E. BILLINGS CO. 

INSURANCE BROKERS AND AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Dou.'ilas 2283 



The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Bank of Italy. 

Me r ..I tin- Associated Savings Banks of Sim Francisco. 

u ending 30, 191 I, 8 dividend has n dei lared 

••it the rate o( four in per ce annum on all savings deposits Day- 
able mi and after Wednesday, July 1, 1914 Dividends nol called (oi an 

idd ind b' ar the sa rate of Intel «l as the principal from Juh I 

oslted on or 1 i"ih will earn Interest from 

July 1. 1914. 

I.. SCATENA, President. A. PKDRINI, Cashier 
corner Montgomery and Clay Sts., Markel si 
Branch -Junction Market, Turk and Mason Btrei 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 

Meml Issoi lated E inks of San 

For I end 

tl".' rat nt per ai 

on and 

lo and ntercat as the principal from July I 1914 

II. C. KXEVESAH1 
Office — 783 Market street, near Fourth. San I 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

ks of San I 
For the half year endli 11(14, a dividend has bi 

at tin- 7iiiiii)i on all deposits, ps 

after Wednes 1914. Dividends nol called (■ i to the 

i .iii.i earn dividends I 1914, 

OEORGE TOTJRNY, Manager 

and 7th \v.- 
Haig 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. " 

Italian-American Bank. 
Men 

_ 
• >n and after W.-.li 

lulv 1 
li»14. M 

Ufn\ 



18 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




Bret Harte's Early Work. 

Charles Meeker Kozlay has collected in one volume ( Hough- 
ton, Mifflin & Co.) stories and poems and other writings of 
Bret Harte's earlier period. The lasting quality of Harte's 
humor is illustrated by some of these fugitive pieces. Many 
of the skits would be as timely to-day as when they were writ- 
ten. In 1868, as in 1906. San Francisco suffered a considerable 
earthquake shock. Anxious for the "fair fame" of their city, 
a committee of leading citizens was formed to muzzle the press, 
so that no alarming reports of the instability of California's 
crust should reach the anticipative Eastern emigrant. Bret 
Harte wrote ar. editorial upon their efforts in The Overland 
Monthly, whose satire is still keen : 

"Much has been written about the lesson of this earthquake. 
Judging from the daily journals, it seems to have been com- 
plimentary to San Francisco. In fact, it has been suggested 
that, with a little more care and preparation on our part the 
earthquake would have been very badly damaged in the en- 
counter. It is well, perhaps, that Nature should know the limi- 
tation of her strength on this coast, and it is equally well that 
we should put a cheerful face upon our troubles. But the truth 
is sometimes even more politic." 

It is related in the Merwin biography, incidentally, that when 
not long afterward it was proposed to offer Bret Harte the 
chair of recent literature in the University of California, the 
appointment was seriously opposed, and actually delayed be- 
because of his unpatriotic conduct in this matter. 

In "An American Haroun Al-Raschid," the "selzer adminis- 
tration of Rutherford B. Hayes is treated with a flippancy 
which strongly reminds one of certain comments heard — or 
dreamed — upon a more recent era of abstinence, while "The 
Great Patent Office Fire" is a satire upon the red tape of 
officialdom, whose acid is still active. While the fire rages, 
the Secretary of the Treasury telegraphs to the Secretary of 
the Interior: 

"In a public emergency like this, it is always safe to dismiss 
a dozen clerks, and reduce the salaries of the remainder. . . . 
An additional guard has been placed around the building out- 
side to prevent the lowering of ropes, by which, under the thin 
disguise of saving life, iron safes containing valuables might 
be concealed on the persons of the so-called escaping victims. 
Any fire occurring in the Treasury after this date will be at- 
tributed to the newspapers." 

In "The Improved Aesop for Intelligent Modern Children," 
the Fable of the Wolf and the Lamb is still so pertinent as to 
deserve quotation in full: 

"A wolf one day, drinking from a running stream, observed 
a lamb also drinking from the same stream at some distance 
from him. T have yet to learn,' said the wolf, addressing the 
lamb with dignified severity, 'what right you have to muddy 
the stream from which I am drinking.' 'Your premises are in- 
correct,' replied the lamb, with bland politeness, 'for if you 
will take the trouble to examine the current critically, you will 
observe that it flows from you to me, and that any disturbance 
of sediment here would be, so far as you were concerned, en- 
tirely local.' 'Possibly you are right,' returned the wolf, 'but 
if I am not mistaken you are the person who, two years ago, 
used some influence against me at the primaries.' 'Impos- 
sible," replied the lamb; 'two years ago I was not born.' 'Ah, 
well,' replied the wolf composedly, T am wrong again. But it 
must convince every intelligent person who has listened to this 
conversation that I am altogether insane, and consequently not 
responsible for my actions.' With this remark, he at once dis- 
patched the lamb, and was triumphantly acquitted. Moral — 
This fable teaches us how erroneous may be the popular im- 
pression in regard to the distribution of alluvium and the for- 
mation of river deltas." 




Illustration for "Through the Bret Harte Country," by Thos. 
Dykes Beasley, published by Paul Elder & Company. 

Modern Dancing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Castle, the noted exponents of the new 
dances, treat of their art in "Modern Dancing" (Harper's), a 
handsome little volume of timely interest. 

Mr. Castle has some interesting things to say about the evo- 
lution of dance steps, even in the short time since the present 
dancing craze manifested itself, and about the direction which 
it is taking: 

"Real dancing means graceful measures tripped to the lilting 
rhythm of fine music. To such dancing is our present tango 
craze leading us. It began in the orgy that the world indulged 
in during the vogue of the turkey trot, the grizzly bear and the 
bunny hug. They marked the dividing line that turned the tide 
from romping toward the minuet. I don't for a minute believe 
that we shall ever dance the real minuet again. But I feel — in 
fact, I know — that the tendency of the moment is strongly in 
the direction of the slow and graceful measures of the dances 
of which the minuet was the first. ... I think the shifting sea- 
son will find us dancing variations not only of the slow waltz, 
the Berlin, the Oxford minuet, but that the dances of to-morrow 
will be a modified form of the Sir Roger de Coverley and the 
minuet itself." 



Penalties in the Other World. 

William Dean Howells in his just-published Shakespearean 
fantasy, "The Seen and Unseen at Stratford-on-Avon," pokes 
fun at his own book, "Familiar Spanish Travels," which was 
published last autumn. Shakespeare informs Howells that the 
spirits in the other world who have wasted time on earth are 
punished by a sense of too much eternity. They often turn, 
says the Bard, to popular literature to fill up this space of time; 
but he acknowledges that he did not consider the reading of 
"Familiar Spanish Travels" as a penalty, though he was unable 
to agree with what Howells wrote about the mosque at Cor- 
dova. 



Good Measure in Salutes. 

The proper count for naval salutes — a subject which has 
lately proved of international interest- — is often, says Admiral 
A. T. Mahan, in his autobiography, "From Sail to Steam," a 
serious matter. "Gun for gun is diplomatically as important 
as an eye for an eye." He tells an anecdote how once, when he 
was a young officer about to fire a national salute to a port, his 
captain provided himself with a number of beans which he put 
in his pocket, shifting a bean to the other pocket with each 
gun in order to keep count. "When I han finished, he called to 
me : 'You have only fired twenty guns.' 'No, sire,' I replied, 
'twenty-one.' 'No,' he repeated, 'twenty; for I have a bean 
left.' 'Alright,' I returned, and I banged an appendix; after 
which, upon counting, it was found that the captain had twenty- 
two beans and the French twenty-two guns — a 'tiger' which 
I hope they appreciated, but am sure they did not 'return.' " 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

{Continued from page 7.) 

Lawyers Run the Legislature. 

The judges are too weak and the lawyers dominate our 
politics. H. G. Weeks, in a recent book, shows how the lawyers 
do the politics and make the laws of the United Kingdom, and 
he explains: "Law is the basis of civilization, but the lawyer 
is the law's consequence, and with us at least the legal pro- 
fession is the political profession. It delights in false issues 
and merely technical politics. Steadily with the ascendancy 
of the House of Commons, the barristers have ousted other 
types of men from political power. The decline of the House 
of Lords has been the last triumph of the house of lawyers, 
and we are governed now to a large extent, not so much by the 
people as by the barristers for the barristers. They set the 
tone of political life. And since they are the most specialized 
and the most specifically trained of all the professions, since 
their training is absolutely antagonistic to the creative im- 
pulses of the constructive artist and the controlled experiments 
of the scientific man, since their business is with evidence and 
advantages and the skillful use of evidence and advantages, 
and not with understanding, they are the least statesmanlike 
of all educated men, and they give our public life a tone as 
hopelessly discordant with our very great and urgent social 
needs as one could well imagine. They do not want to deal 
at all with the great and urgent social needs. They play a 
game, a long and interesting game with parties as sides, a game' 
that rewards the industrious player with prominence, place, 
power and great rewards." 

Z ~S ■» 

More True of California. 

All this might have been written of California with greater 
emphasis and more complete accuracy. The legislature of this 
State is absolutely dominated by a bunch of lawyers. These 
men make our laws. In fact, they are the legislature, and the 
system is inherently vicious to the last degree. Why? Because 
it is legal to bribe a lawyer without incurring penalty for that 
crime. The Governor has in his gift a score or more of com- 
fortable appointments, most of them sinecures, for which only 
lawyers are eligible. If you take the trouble to look over the 
State blue book, you will find that all these fat jobs are filled 
by members of the legislature. Such is the process by which 
the Governor's program is jammed through the legislature, and 
so the State administration's machine is built up by this dis- 
guised form of bribery. 

Returning to the subject of the law's delay, its persistence 
in the face of popular and universal criticism arises largely 
from the fact that measures of reform in this regard are side- 
tracked in the legislature by this bunch of shyster lawyers, who 
see their profit in the perpetuation of present vicious condi- 
tions. Honest lawyers, and it should be emphasized that there 
are plenty of such, are eager to see the practice of law re- 
formed, but these men are too busy to bother with a shyster's 
job in the legislature, and so it has happened that when meas- 
ures of reform were propounded by the San Francisco Bar 
Association and the Commonwealth Club of this city, they were 
killed by the pettifoggers in the legislature. 



<>\'F.RLAND FOR JULY. 

The place of honor in the July Overland Monthly is given to 
"Chasing Chinese Pirates," by Lewis P. Freeman, in which the 
author tells of some daring exploits of the pirates from the 
West river who swoop down on small villages near Hongkong 
and loot everything in sight. The article is illustrated from 
photographs of piratical junks and government police boats. 
Other illustrated articles are the second chapter of "The Log 
of a '49'er," by Theodore Messerve; "Indian Bread Makers of 
Yosemite," by Frank T. Lea; "The Last of the Sheep Trailers," 
by David W. Tulloch; "Famous Southern California Ranchos," 
by Mary L. McKinley, and "The Country Home of Frank J. 
Sullivan," by Josephine C. McCrackin. Short stories and 
poems make up a good number. — San Francisco Chronicle. 



It is regarded as reason for judicious pride that the 

University of California has twice as many undergraduates as 
Harvard University, as shown by the latest figures. Harvard 
had this year 2,359 undergraduate students, as compared with 
4,682 undergraduates at Berkeley. Summer session students 
are not included in either tabulation. Moreover, California 
keeps a volcano on tap. 



SHORTRIDGE FOR SENATOR. 

The Colusa Sun says : "Hon. Samuel M. Shortridge, as a 
Republican condidate for the high office of United States Sena- 
tor. Mr. Shortridge is one of the brightest men of California, 
and is well known from Del Norte to Imperial, either person- 
ally or by reputation, and no opposing Republican candidate can 
have anything on "Sam" Shortridge when it comes to a good, 
clean reputation. In Mr. Shortridge the Republicans surely 
have a candidate of whom they need not be ashamed. 

STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF THE 1^ 

I BANK OF ITALY I 

\ SAVINGS MEMBER COMMERCIAL « 

§* Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. : '% 

The San Francisco Clearing House Association *3 

S JUNE 30, 1914 N 

5j ASSETS S 

5 First mortgage loans on Real Estate % 6,359,715.16 S 

# Real Estate, Bank Buildings. Furniture, Fixtures ami K 

U Sate Deposit Vaults 815,977.95 S 

jj Time Loans (Collateral and Petsonal) 6ii2.6im.14 n 

/ Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 201.451.98 * 

(J Other Assets 19.196.82 

S United States, State, Municipal and Other 

Bomls $2,766,033.68 

3 Demand Loans (Collateral and Personal).. 3,975.226.87 

S CASH 2,430.318.34 9,171,673.89 

C $17,170,524.93 

§ =:=5 

S LIABILITIES 8 

5 Capital Paid Up $1,250,000.00 Eg 

S Surplus and Undivided Profits 340,221.33 B 

5 Dividends I'npald 37,646.00 9 

B Letters .a Credil 201,451.98 j2 

6 DEPOSITS 15.341.205.62 6, 

H $17,170,524.93 S 

V =:= fl 

d ST \ti; i IF CALIFORNIA. W 

j CITY AND COUNTY "I" SAX FRANCISCO g 

<- .i ii Skh and a. pedrini rately, duly sworn, £ 

J ''.i'ii for himself, says that said J. 1 1 skim - President 2 

g .'■■ tii i •< Irini i- Cashiei of the Bank "i" Italy, the cor- £ 

a poration nbovi men d, and that everj statemenl contained £ 

therein ts Im wn knowledge and belief. S 

- J. H. SKINNER, m 

r d A. PEDRINI, 5j 

l| Subscribed and sworn to before me this 80th day <>f June, 1914. ^ 

n THOMAS s BURNBS, Notary Public. £ 

v The Story of Our Growth $ 

^ As shown by a Comparative- Statement of our Assets 

ft" UBtt 1 " t ..... - f 

S DECEMBER II. IMS JI.UI.W* M w* 
IiEl'FMBKl; II. 19UG ■ tl.MR.M1 ..- # 

5 DECEMBI K 'I. I«KI7 SMIIjejS «J 

8 DECE.MBHR 31, 1008 ------ *2, 574, 004 90 p 

£ DECEMBER 31. 1909 $8,817,217 70 £ 

£ DECEMBER 31, 1910 - - - gn, 539,861. 47 « 

£ DECEMBER 31. 1911 - - - $8,379,347.02 g 
I DECEMBER 31. 1912 - - #11.228.814.56 g 
! DECEMBER 81, 1913 - - $15,882,911.61 
\ JUNE 30, 1914 - $17,170,524.93. 

5 * 

J NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS 47,000 5 

5 

^ Savings Deposits Made on or Before July 10th 

\ Will Earn Interest From July 1st. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

California Leads 

According to road statistics announced recently by the Cali- 
fornia Highway Commission, California laid almost three times 
as much concrete for highways and streets in 1913 as any other 
State in the Union. The State now stands second in total 
amount of concrete roads and streets in this country. 

There were 1,776,000 square yards of concrete highways or 
streets laid in California this year, out of a total of 8,093,360 
square yards for the entire United States. Ohio stands next 
to California, with 655,650 square yards. 

The total amount of concrete roads and streets in the United 
States to January 1, 1914, was 18,436,016 square yards, of 
which California is credited with 1,979,000. New York leads 
with an aggregate of 2,402,785 square yards. It is believed 
by the completion of the $18,- 
000,000 State Highway sys- 
tem, California will. take first 
place. The California High- 
way Commission now has un- 
der way three times as much 
road construction work as in 
any single public project in 
this country. 

Last Link jf Road 

In a short time work will be 
started on the twenty mile 
stretch of State Highway con- 
necting Knights Ferry and 
Sonora, and connecting up the 
last link on the road from the 
bay cities and Stockton into 
the Yosemite Valley. 

W. H. Newell, of Oakda'e, 
has been appointed a super- 
visor of the work by the State 
Highway Commission, and 
will construct the road by day 
labor. The State Board has 
allcted $130,000 for the con- 
struction of the new road, of 
which it is estimated by 
Newell that $110,000 will be 
required for wages. The re- 
maining $20,000 will be used 
in purchase of the necessary 
implements and for cement. 
Practically all of the material 
required in the construction of 
the highway is to be found 
adjacent to the road, so that 
its cost will be nominal, or 
what is required for handling. 




M. "Joe" Tansey smiling at 
Tires. 



San Mateo Roads 

The motorists who visit 
San Mateo County during the 
Fair year will be rewarded 
with highways smooth as 
glass, running through a ter- 
ritory rich in scenic splendors. 
Co-operating with the Tour- 
ist Association of the bay 
counties, the Supervisors of 
San Mateo County have gone 



OUR SUNSHINE CLUB 

The face is a sure index of the thoughts that are in 
the mind. 

Hence, always smile. 

The continuous smile at times may be considered a lie, 
but it is a pleasant lie, and one that the public forgives. 

Some faces show a very dilapidated condition of the 
mind. A mind badly in need of the repair shop. 

The face that carries the smile shows the small cost of 
upkeep and big mileage of thought. 

M. "Joe" Tansey. 



heartily into the efforts of the organization to make the bay 
district the Mecca of travelers who will flock to the West in 
1915, and they believe that the most essential thing to accom- 
plish this end is to provide good roads. They have not gone 
into the matter half heartedly, but with a spirit that insures 
success. San Francisco city and county is co-operating with 

San Mateo County to the extent of $135,000. 

* * * 

Mew La Honda Road 

The Board of Supervisors of San Mateo County have just 
awarded the contract for grading the La Honda section of the 
tew boulevard from Redwood City to the coast under the 
county $1,250,000 bond issue for good roads. The price is $46,- 
983.19, the engineer's estimate for the work being $60,919. The 
new route abolishes the noted La Honda grade, which has been 
the scene of many accidents. 

* * * 

Mountain Boulevard* 

With the backing of a number of Sacramento and Northern 
California business men, a project for the construction of a 
system of individual mountain boulevard units, extending at 
intervals from Reno, Nevada, to Sacramento, to connect with 
the Sacramento-San Francisco State Highway, was launched 
recently at Sacramento. 

As outlined, the mountain boulevards, which are to be inde- 
pendent of the State Highway system, will be routed from 
Reno to Quincy in Plumas County, from Quincy to Oroville, 

and also from Redding to Al- 
turas in Modoc County, via 
Montgomery Creek and Fall 
City. It is the idea to route 
a mountain boulevard system 
to accommodate tourists to 
the 1915 Exposition at San 
Francisco and to build up 
Sacramento as a trade center. 
A definite plan of financing 
the project has not yet been 
considered. 



Big Baaln Road O. K'd 

The successful ending of 
the long campaign for a State 
highway into the Big Basin 
Park will be celebrated by a 
festival on the summit of the 
Santa Cruz Mountains. The 
plan was outlined at a meet- 
ing of the Sempervirens Club 
at San Jose held recently. 
The State appropriation of 
$70,000 for a road into the 
reservation from the Saratoga 
summit, contingent upon the 
donation of a right of way, 
has just been authorized, 
largely through the subscrip- 
tion of San Francisco million- 
aires to a right of way fund. 
Work on the thoroughfare, 
which will make the big trees 
easily accessible to the people 
of Central California, is to be 
commenced shortly. 
* * » 

Auto Digs Up Gold 

A unique discovery of gold 
was made by H. W. Kelly, an 
officer of the Indian service 
just across the international 
line, near Sasabe, Arizona, 
when his automobile became 
stuck in a sandy wash. In 
getting the machine out, gold 
nuggets were discovered to the 
sum of $24, and he will return 
later to follow up the discov- 
ery. The location is secret. 



the big mileage of Pennsylvania 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



Relocate Old Roads 

The average life of horses and automobiles may be increased 
and the cost of hauling reduced, according to the Office of 
Roads, Department of Agriculture, by relocating many old 
roads and the more scientific laying out of new ones. The 
natural tendency in road building is to build a straight road, 
whether it goes over steep grades or hills or not, and pulling 
over these grades naturally adds to the wear and tear on horses 
and vehicles. The doctrine of the Office of Roads is that the 
longest way around may often be the shortest and most eco- 
nomical way home, and that frequently by holding a highway 
around a hill or grade, but little appreciable distance is added, 
and this is more than offset by the reduced strain of hauling. 

The chief drawback from the farm owner's point of view is 
that the laying out of roads on this principle of avoiding grades 
necessitates, in some cases, running the road through good farm 
land or orchards or pastures, instead of going around the farm 
line and building the road through old, worn out fields and over 
rocky knolls. This, of course, must raise a question in the 
mind of the individual land owner as to whether the cutting up 
of his property by a road yields him individual advantages and 
so benefits his community as to offset the use of such land for 
a road, or to overcome the inconvenienec of having his land 
divided. In this connection the Office of Roads points out that 
the running of a road through a good farm, where there are 
good sheep, cattle, horses, grain, fruit or vegetables, has a cer- 
tain advertising value, and in many instances makes the land 
more valuable. In other cases, the importance of such a level 
road to the community is so great that it might well repay 
those using the road to give the farmer the equivalent in land 
equally good in place of what he has sacrificed to the common 
welfare. 



emergency brake lever in the center. The next instant the car 
performed extraordinary gyrations, which resulted in the death 

of the driver when he was pitched through the windshield. 

* * * 

New Loop the Loop 

Earl Stough, a farmer near York, Pa., has learned that it is 
not necessary to go to the country fair in order to loop the 
loop. He can do it right on his farm, and in his own autombile. 
The discovery was made when Stough started to use his 
machine to furnish power for a cornsheller. He drove the 
machine up a slope into the barn, where it refused to stop. 
Keeping on going, it made foi the open door at the other end, 
opening into the meadow 30 feet below. As the car went over, 
it struck a piece of scantling, which turned it completely over, 
so that it landed right side up, with Stough still safely in the 

seat. No damage was done. 

* * * 

Canned Records 

"Canned voices" are nothing new, but an idea of how im- 
portant and valuable certain Western garages consider them- 
selves may be gathered from the following incident, duly re- 
ported with a wealth of detail in the Watertown (Wis.) Ga- 
zette: "The corner stone of the new garage was laid this week, 
and in it were placed phonographic records of the voices of the 
the president of the company, the secretary, the sales mana- 
ger, superintendent, and the members of the office force and 
factory foremen." 

* sfs He 

Want Name for Road 

About $1,000,000 has been used by the people of San Ber- 
nardino County to build the greatest mountain drive in the 
West, and now they seek a name for it. And because they 



ft 



T i 




-«►; <*£ 



-%*4tf 



Sales force of Pacific Kissel-Kar Branch, at one of their weekly sales meetings. 

Photo by Arthur Spaulding Co. 



Foreign Tour 

One of the largest touring parties ever gathered for a long 
trip left Naples recently for a tour of Tripoli in Northern 
Africa. The cars were shipped on board an Italian steamer 
and the plans call for a thorough "exploration tour" of all that 
section of Tripoli which has been wrested from the native 
tribes and which is safe enough to travel in without getting 
shot. 

* » » 

Brakes on Front Wheel 

Brakes for the front wheels of automobiles are viewed as 
among the construction features which sooner or later may 
perhaps become generally adopted, taking the place of the 
brake on the transmission, where this is still used, and of one 
of the sets of brakes on the rear wheels, especially or the ex- 
terior set, where only wheel brakes are employed. 



Leave the Driver Alone 

Considerable interest attaches to the report from Kearny, 
N. J., describing an automobile accident. It seems that 
senger sitting in the front seat, and fearing a collision * 
car ahead, took matters into his own hands and pulled the 



want a name that will play a fitting part in the fame which they 
expect the great scenic highway to win, the County Board of 
Supervisors has launched a contest, and on July 29th will select 
the name. Within a week or two after the selection of the name 
a christening celebration will be held at Pinecrest, a mile high, 
and the people of Southern California will be invited to come 
and see the wonders of the region. 

The crest drive, which forms a loop and winds eighty-five 
miles through the heart of the range, is now nearing comple- 
tion. Workmen are now taking out the rough spots, and when 
they are through, some time next month, the trip will be easy 

for any kind of an automobile. 

• * * 

Pboenlx Race 

Word was received that $2,000 already has been raised at 
Phoenix for the next desert road race. According to informa- 
tion, the Arizona boosters are expecting a larger entry list this 
year than ever before. An early plan for the race was to have 
the start at San Diego, with the route up the coast to Los An- 
geles, and then by Mecca to Brawley. Both the Colorado and 
Gila Rivers will be bridged this year, and it may be that the 
race will be run through to Phoenix without the usual Yuma 
night control. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




Sociability run, Chicago-Detroit cycle cars to Indianapolis, attending International Automobile races, May 30, 1914. Frcm 
right to left — Woods Mobilette, official pace maker, Chicago. Scripps-Booth, Detroit. Mercury, Detroit. Dudley-Bug, 
Menominee, Mich. Vixen, Milwaukee, Wis. Photo taken at the Circle {Soldiers' Monument), Indianapolis. 



Woods Mobilette Pacemaker 

The International Automobile Races, recently held at In- 
dianapolis, were so much in the public eye, and deservedly so, 
that little publicity was given to the interesting migration of 
cyclecars, quite a number of which were driven to the Hoosier 
City that their pilots might be spectators of the contests in 
which the large vehicles exclusively participated. Three 
months ago such a demonstration by the little cars would not 
have been possible, as at that time too few makers could spare 
even a demonstration car. It was arranged that a Sociability 
Run from Chicago and Detroit should 
be made. One group left Chicago at 7 
a. m. on May 28th, arriving in Indian- 
apolis on the afternoon of the 29th; the 
other group left Detroit about the same 
time, meeting the Chicago contingent at 
Rochester, Ind., from which point they 
traveled together to Indianapolis. 

The run from Chicago to Indianapolis 
is about the same distance as from De- 
troit, a little short of two hundred and 
forty miles. Of the Chicago cars that 
rolled into Indianapolis on schedule time 
was the pacemaker, Woods Mobilette, 
the Dudley-Bug and the Vixen. Two 
Imp cyclecars joined the procession at 
Rochester, Ind., which was the first con- 
trol, and where also, the Detroit group 
was added to the procession. Among 
the Detroit cars was a Scripps-Booth and 
a Mercury. 

The official pacemaker, Woods Mobil- 
ette, made the return trip over a differ- 
ent route, which lengthened the distance 
traveled some fifty miles. This car made 
the trip down at an average speed of bet- 
ter than twenty miles per hour, and the 
return trip at an average of twenty-four 
miles per hour. 

Just out of Indianapolis, the cyclecars 
were met by a large local assembly of 
cyclecars and a big motor truck richly 
decorated with American flags and carry- 
ing a brass band. The procession lined 
up and paraded to the Monument, where 
a great crowd of many thousands of peo- 



ple cheered and admired these productions of the new motor 
industry. 

Cameras were kept clicking that the event, which will be re- 
corded in motor vehicle history as the dawn of a new epoch in 
American industrialism, may be amply illustrated. 

This Sociability Run was the first long distance official 
demonstration of American made cyclecars. The varying road 
conditions and the distance traveled, gave plenty of opportunity 
for demonstrating the road efficiency of these little vehicles. 
Both the 28th and 29th were intensely hot days, the ther- 



Self-Cooled in Hot Weather 

Augmented as it is in Summer by hot road surfaces, the 
friction heat of tire-travel becomes a tire killer. Racing men 
have discovered the remarkable heat shedding powers of 

PE NN S VLVAN I A 

vacuum 1 cupnri RES 

Instead of becoming stored up in the tire the heat radiates 
completely from the Vacuum Cups and is thrown off as it 
generates, the tire being never in danger of weakening. 

Vacuum Cup Tires are— 

GUARANTEED not to skid on wet or greasy pavements, else 
returnable at full purchase price after reasonable trial. 

GUARANTEED to be immune to the rubber destroying effects 
of oil In any form. 

GUARANTEED to give a minimum of 4,500 miles actual ser- 
vice—their average service being nearer twice this figure. 

Give yourself the benefit of V. C. Safety and Service. 



TANSEY-CROWE AUTO CO. 
1233 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



MARTLAND CO. 
19th and Broadway, Oakland 



Pennsylvania Rubber Co. 

OF CALIFORNIA 

160 SECOND ST. San Francisco, Cal. 




July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



mometer registering in the nineties. These days were pre- 
ceded by a day of heavy storms, but neither the hot weather, 
deep sand nor clay mud holes seriously affected the cyclecars 
or their pilots. 

Adverse road conditions were easily obviated by reason of 
the narrow 36 in. tread of the cars. Automobile drivers who 
were frequently passed on the rough stretches of road com- 
mented upon the ease and facility with which these little cars 
negotiated the bad places, hills, etc. The citizens of one In- 
diana town were plentifully surprised when the Chicago con- 
tirgent took the sidewalk in preference to a particularly muddy 
roadway. It is probably the first time in the motor vehicle 
history of this country that a procession of self-propelled ve- 
hicles was seen monopolizing the sidewalks. 

* • » 

Regal In Oakland 

A change has been made by the Regal people in Oakland. A 
branch from the San Francisco house of the Frank 0. Ren- 
strom Company, Regal distributers, has been established at 
2840 Broadway. It is the intention of the Renstrom concern to 
maintain permanent headquarters in Oakland at this address, 
and to establish a service station and look after the welfare of 

the Regal cars. 

* • • 

Go Through Bouquet Canyon 

Motorists touring to the north are advised by the touring in- 
formation bureau of the Automobile Club of Southern Califor- 
nia to use Bouquet Canyon on the inland route to Bakersfield. 

* * * 

Value of Good Tires 

The value of tires, which give a perfect traction, is nowhere 
better demonstrated than on the coast. This country, where 
mountains, valleys and deserts vie with each other to monopo- 
lize the landscape. Cars, to successfully traverse the mountain 
passes and desert trails, must have a tire equipment which will 
insure them steerage on the worst of roads. 

"Motz high efficiency cushion tires have been found ideal 
for this difficult service," says Henry D. McCoy, of Chanslor 
& Lyon Company. "One of their many users is Thompson 
& Smith, who operate a transfer service between Bakersfield 
and the various mountain resorts and oil fields in Central 
California. They experimented with practically every make 
of tire, until they found the Motz; then their tire troubles 
were over. In spite of adverse road conditions, Motz tires on 
their trucks gave them fifteen to twenty-five thousand miles of 
service." 

* » * 

Annual Outing 

The Emmons Draying and Safe Moving Company gave its 
fifth annual outing at Coyote Park near San Mateo. More than 
three hundred employees and their friends enjoyed the hospi- 
tality of the company. It was a sort of motor outing, as every- 
one that went to the park did so in one of the thirty-five Fed- 
eral motor trucks loaned for the occasion by W. L. Hughson, 
president of the Pacific Kissel Kar branch. Among those 
present were police judges, supervisors, traffic officers, dray- 
men, and many in most walks of life. There were games, 

speeches, and a big feast. 

* * * 

Using the Brakes 

Motorists, recently touring England tell an amusing story : 
Mounting an exceptionally steep hill, they overtook an old 
man painfully pedaling an antiquated tricycle. 

Noticing that he had his brakes on hard, they called his 
attention to the circumstance. 

"I knows," said he. "I be afeared o' going backwards to the 

bottom of the hill." 

* * * 

Didn't Convince Her 

A man was very much surprised one day to see an old friend 
riding around in a motor car, for he had said he would never 
buy one, as his wife was afraid of them. 

"How did you manage to convince your wife that automobil- 
ing wasn't dangerous?" he asked. 

"I didn't convince her," replied his friend; "but she gave 
in at lbst when I proved to her by statistics that it wasn't half 
as dahgerous as dodging them." 




kid-preventive devices if your 



What good are all these 
brakes don't hold ? 

And how can you depend on your brakes unless they are 

lined with Raybestos, the only brake lining o( absolutely 

dependable safety ? 

Made of long-fibre asbestos. Insist on Raybestos. Look for 

the name on every foot, and the silver edges. 

The Royal Equipment Company, 1362 Bostwick Avenue, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 




BEQ.Mg US. PAT. OFF 



SOLVE YOUR 
LUBRICATING PROBLEMS 

WITH 

HARMS 

TRADE MARK REG. U.S. PAT. OFF. 

OILS 

GREASES 

Because they are the best lubricants. No soot- 
-: deposits, flagrant smoking or other troubles caused 
I by poor oils are found on a motor lubricated by 
; HARRIS OILS because they are manufactured from 
i the best grade of Pennsylvania Crude which is ac- 
knowledged to be the best in the world. 

A Little Goe» a Long Way 
And Every Drop Counts 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 

Branch Chicago, III. PROVIDENCE, R. I 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 



LOS ANGELES 
FRESNO 



YOU MAY 

BEAT THE 

PRICE 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PORTLAND 




SEATTLE 
OAKLAND 



BUT YOU 

CAN'T BEAT 

THE QUALITY 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



Batavta Tires Win 

Richard G. Badger, in speaking of the Batavia tires on his 
car when he broke the New York to Boston record, says in a 
communication which has just been received by Stott-Strug- 
nell Company: 

"I know you will be interested to learn that my brother and 
I have just made the fastest time on record between New York 
and Boston. The elapsed tire was 6 hours and 15 minutes, the 
actual running time being less than 5 hours and 45 minutes. 

"My National roadster, in which we made the run, was 
equipped with Batavia tires, and I feel confident that this 
was an important factor in our success. We had absolutely no 
tire trouble on the run. This, in itself, is a tire record to be 
proud of, and is made even more remarkable by the fact that 
all four tires had been given over 2,500 miles of the hardest 
kind of driving .previous to this trip. Only those who have 
been over the route and know the road conditions can appre- 
ciate what a tremendous strain was put on the tires. I would 
not have believed it possible to make this run in this time with- 
out a puncture or a blow-out unless I had actually seen it 
done." 



New Claim 

The Kissel-Kar branch refuted 
the claim often made that just be- 
cause a car is light, it is necessar- 
ily easy on tires. To prove this 
point they quoted a statement sent 
out by the Kissel factory: 

"The fact that the relation of 
weight to up-keep and maintenance 
is sometimes distorted in the pub- 
lic mind is clearly evidenced in the 
list of prize winners announced by 
the Ajax-Grieb Rubber Company, 
which distributed $5,000 to motor 
drivers showing the highest mile- 
age, starting April, 1912, and end- 
ing last month, on Ajax tires. Fif- 
teen prizes were awarded, and the 
first three who pulled down the big 
money are all drivers of cars which 
are not placed in the light weight 
class. The winner, a large 6-cylin- 
der car, rolled up a high score of 
16,782 miles,; it was owned in 
Marlboro, Mass. A Detroit, Mich., 
owned car of 60 h. p. was second 
with 13,900 miles, and the lightest 
car of the first three at Victoria, B. 
C, weighing 4,000 pounds, was 
third with 13,761. 

"Light cars were entered and oc- 
casionally appear in the list of win- 
ners, but not up at the top. The 
result of the contest, therefore, 
seems to show that the question, 
'How much should a car weigh?' 
does not bear the same relation al- 
ways to maintenance and up-keep 
as is popularly supposed. Six 
thousand miles is generally consid- 
ered a pretty good record for a tire, 
but yet we have a great number of 
Kissel Kar owners who are getting 
from 7,000 up as high as 14,000 
miles, all of which indicates that 
economy of operation is not as 
closely dependent on lightness of 
construction as is frequently as- 
serted." 



and trim lines of this type of tire for ordinary service. The 
raised corrugations on the tread act as a safeguard against 
puncture, prevent side-slip, and by reason of the extra thick- 
ness of rubber at the point of greatest wear, add very materi- 
ally to the life of the tire. The Federal Corrugated Tread 
Tire is a thoroughly good tire, and fully up to the general 
standard of Federal quality. 

* * * 

Paste In Your Hat 

The following from the house organ of the B. F. Goodrich 
Company, makers of Goodrich tires, is worth remembering: 
"Cut out these rules and paste them into your Rules of the Road 
Bood; they are a valuable addition to that already valuable 
handbook : 

"Never attempt to cross a railroad track without first know- 
ing that no engine or train is approaching. 

"It is easier to stop an automobile than a train. 

"Too frequently drivers of autos are engrossed in talking 
with their friends and paying no attention to surroundings 
when accident occur. 

"An engineer is not to blame if he cannot stop his train after 
he sees you drive deliberately onto the track ahead." 



Corrugated Type 

The corrugated type was the 
first motorcycle tire to come into 
general use, and is still preferred 
by many riders who favor the neat 



Announcement 
Of Importance to the Trade 

International Cycle-Car and Accessories Company announces 
its organization as general distributors of cycle-cars, cycle-car 
parts, assemblies and accessories. 

It announces the entering into an arrange- The policy of International Cycle-Car and 
ment with Woods Mobilette Company for the Accessories Company will be strictly one of 
general distribution of Woods Mobilettes— dependable service. It will deal direct with each 
America's First Cycle-Car— and for the general ,.„i„ », ... i„^ ..!„„ . ... , t 
distribution of such other cycle-car parts as dealer thuS lnsurlng t0 the manufacturers re- 
Woods Mobilette Company will manufacture presented on the one hand and to the dealer and 
for the trade. consumer on the other, a service that is at once 

It will also handle cvcle-car accessories, and economic, speedy, ef- 

correspondence from manufacturers of same, fective, direct, efficient 

is invited. and satisfactory. 



Price $380, f. o. b., Harvey, 111. 

Shield and Top, $15 Extra 




WOODS MOBILETTE 



"America's First Cycle-Car" 



Whet i Basi i"-' Inches, trvad m inches 
Motor: Four Cylinder— 12 h. p.. water cooled. 
Transmission: Sliding gear type. Two speeds forward 
ami one revel - 



Axles: Prop forged— IPSO lbs., capacity; rear axle 

full lloaling type. 

Bverj mechanical detail is of superior 
and proven worth. 



THIS CAR IS AN AUTOMATIC SELLER. The guarantee of integrity is valid. 

Dealer's Applications Being Acted Upon in the Order Received 

INTERNATIONAL CYCLE-CAR AND ACCESSORIES COMPANY 

Genera! Distributors 

SALESROOMS: 1509 Michigan Blvd. EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 1-1109 Security Bldg. Chicago, III., U. S. J. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



Mexican General Buys Mitchell 

"Warfare in Mexico, conducted mostly in regions where the 
horse is the most dependable medium of transportation, has 
developed a big factor in the economic transactions in neigh- 
borhood United States territory, according to Captain Alfonso 
Yberri, confidential agent to General Villa, who recently made 
a trip to Los Angeles to inspect the offerings on the automobile 
row of the city of Angels," says 0. 0. McFarland, of Osen- 
McFarland Auto Company, agents for the Mitchell car. 

"Villa's gigantic operations against Torreon, although some- 
what successfully veiled from the view of correspondents, have 
been pushed to a climax by the aid of motor squads and high- 
powered, dependable automobiles capable of standing up over 
the rough usage given by dashes over plateau country without 
roads, have been in such great demand that the rebel chieftain 
had to send h'is agent to the nearest big source of supply in the 
United States to get this motor car equipment. Captain Yberri 
took several demonstrations in Mitchell cars. 

"Possessing considerable technical information about motor 
cars, the Mexican selected the Mitchell. On every demon- 
stration demanded, the most strenuous test that could be given 
in that portion of California, requiring the Mitchell to go 
through rough and sandy ground and up hills that were scarcely 
marked by trails." 



Advertising Proves Worth 

"The automobile buyer who hesitates to purchase a car that 
is extensively advertised for fear that such advertising is an 
added expense which he has to pay, displays poor judgment to 
say the least," says Norman de Vaux, the head of the Reo- 
Pacific Company, distributers for the Reo car. 

"Show me a car that has been extensively advertised each 
season, and I will show you a car that is popular, and one that 
gives satisfaction to the owner. Judicious and comprehensive 
advertising means nothing more than the employment of one of 
the highest grade salesmen that can be secured. 

"Take for instance the systematic advertising that has been 
done by the Reo factory. Follow one ad. after another and you 
will see that they contain nothing but direct statements which 
must be true or false. 

"Money spent in extensive and judicious advertising is the 
best investment in the world to-day for every one concerned; 
for the manufacturer, the dealer and the purchaser of a motor 
car. The product that is not advertised will not sell readily, 
no matter how attractive are quality and price. The grocer 
or other dealer who has on his shelves goods that are not ad- 
vertised will bear witness to the truth of this statement. Whole- 
salers and manufacturers who do not use truthfulness by the 
cost system figures for their sales department. Any salesman 
in the world will tell you that advertised goods can be, and are, 
sold at much less cost than those unknown, except to a com- 
paratively small coterie of users. 

"Successful advertising is a sure indication of equality, for 
without value of the product, no advertising could succeed. The 
manufacturer and every one connected with the distribution 
would lose reputation and money, for the public will not long 
continue to be gulled. Advertising is no more an extrava- 
gance than is the use of good seed or good machinery by the 
farmer. Extensive advertising is just as economical as quan- 
tity production in the motor car industry, for it brings larger 
and quicker returns on the investment, allowing for reinvest- 
ment in materials and consequent large production." 

• • » 
Cargo of Flsk Tires 

A cargo of Fisk tires that would fill ten freight cars, or a 
solid trainload, will make up the shipload that will be on one 
of the first vessels that passes through the Panama Canal, 
consigned to the coast. This word was received from the fac- 
tory by B. H. Pratt. Pacific Coast manager of the Fisk Rubber 
Company. The ship has been chartered, and the stock is beint: 
sent to the Eastern seaport for loading on the big vessel. Just 
as soon as permitted, the boat will proceed to Panama. 

California is the biggest user of tires in the United States. 
With a registration of automobiles that places it in the second 
place, the natural demand for tires is enormous. The Fisk tire 
people have seen these possibilities, and have established dis- 
tributing depots all over the coast to care for their interests. 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH — 301 California Street 

Telephone Sutter 3010 



San Francisco 



Tips to Auto mobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 

houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



MARIN COUNTY. 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL.— AUTO LIVERY GARAGE., 435 Fourth street 

Tel. S. R. 2GS3. Crane & Langford, Props. Bolinas auto stage leaves 

Union Depot daily 9:41 a. m., connecting with S:45 a. m. boat from S. F. 

Leaves Bolinas 2:30 p. m. same day. A scenic and delightful auto ride. 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
SANTA ROSA.— GRAND GARAGE. Under new management. Third 
and Main street, opposite the court house. Phone 166. Finest equipped 
and convenient garage of any in Sonoma County. GEORGE A. ROSS, 
Proprietor. 



PETALUMA.- PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
& Murphy, Props. Cor. Third and C Sts.; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
general machine work and gear- cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 



SONOMA, CAL.— MISSION GARAGE (Fireproof). Phone Main 741. E. 
"VV. Gottenberg, Prop. Full line of supplies, vulcanizing, machine shop. 
etc. Expert workmanship only. Service car and auto livery at all 
hours. 



NAPA COUNTY. 
ST. HELENA, CAL.— NAPA VALLEY GARAGE. R. A. Blum, Prop. 
Day phone 1501; night phone 853. Supplies, oils, general repairing. Auto 
livery. Service car at all hours. Expert workmanship only. Agency 
for Mitchell and Ford cars. 



ST. HELENA, CAL.— HOTEL ST. HELENA. Entirely renovated and 
under new management. Headquarters for automobilists. Finest cuisine 
in Napa Valley. Music in dining room ; highest quality beverages; roof 
garden, etc. Wm. Wagner, Manager. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

SUPPLIES. Electric welding. Complete machine 
Telephone. 



MILPITAS.— AUTO 
shop. Expert mechanics. Spangler Brothers 



PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on th>- Wishbone Rout.- devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of Un iversity avenue and The Circle. 

SAN JOSE. — LAMOLLE GRILL. 36-38 North First street. The be! I 
French dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties 
given particulai attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St.. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at al! hours. Tin? and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

BEACH HILL INN.— Location boat in Santa Cruz, on crest of Beach 
Hill, l block from beach - blocks from Casino; view of se:i nnd moun- 
tain; appointments unique; garage near by. Address MISS A. PORTER. 



Lathe Work, United States <>r Metric Screw Cut 

Atttomoblle Wort n Specialty, American or Foreign oars 

\ Full Ciine of Parts and Accessories. Also Hand-Made Oil-Tempered 

Springs Always on Hand 

AUTO MACHINE WORKS 



MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 



Phone Frank Hn 



350 Golden Gate Avenu e 

i [] de and i. fir: I 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9.000 square feet of 
floor space, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially Invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging. 
Kodak, etc. You will be Interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO.. 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco. Cal. 
Phon«i— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



Overland Six 

That the Overland factory will place a six-cylinder, seven- 
passenger motor car on the market for 1915 is the interesting 
announcement that A. D. Plughoff, general manager of J. W. 
Leavitt & Company, and A. R. Theisen, treasurer of the same 
company, bring back with them from their trip to the Overland 
factory. 

Plughoff and Theisen made the trip east as the guests of the 
Overland factory to attend the annual convention at which was 
discussed the future of the Willys-Overland Company. 

"Of the many things made public at that time, the fact that 
the Overland factory was to build a six cylinder car was by far 
the most important," says Plughoff. 

In speaking of this new car he says : "For some time we, 
as Coast distributers, have realized that the buying public 
to a certain extent wanted six cylinder cars, and many of those 
who have owned Overlands turned to us asking if the factory 
ever expected to build them, as the four cylinder car had 
proved so satisfactory. They were desirous of having a six- 
cylinder of the same make. This same desire has been ex- 
pressed all ovei the United States, and to meet this demand the 
Overland factory has at last entered the six-cylinder field." 

"The 6-cylinder addition to the Overland line will be of the 
popular price model, at which figure it has all the appearance 
of a record-breaking value that is unattainable to any but an 
old and well-equipped, quality producing manufacturer like 
J. N. Willys. 

"In appearance the Overland Six is stylish and impressive, 
and, according to the manufacturers, a revelation in service. 
The wheelbase is 125 inches. The long stroke motor is rated 
at 45-50 horsepower, the handsome streamline body seems to 
indicate fleetness and power. The tires are 35x4y 2 in. on de- 
mountable rims, and every modern automobile convenience, 
such as electric self-starter, electric lights., etc., have been 

incorporated in the liberal specifications." 
* * * 

The Jelfery Quad 

The Jeffery quad, the name given to the new four-wheel 
drive Jeffery truck, will be a revelation to those who use motor 
trucks when it shortly arrives in San Francisco," says J. I. 
McMullen, general manager of the Jeffery Auto Sales Com- 
pany. "This truck has proved its ability and success over 
roads that stopped other trucks in tests made by the United 
States government. These tests were not made by factory 
experts, but were made by the United States government in 



actual service; if there were any shortcomings, they would be 
brought to light. That such was the case was proved by those 
which failed to meet the requirements of the government. 

"Four wheels do their fair share of the work in this Jeffery 
quadruple drive. Front and rear axles divide the labor of 
pushing the truck forward." 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 



FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Commercial Trucks 
A Specialty 



Automobile 
Supplies 



The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



CLASS A GARAGE, Inc. 

Particular Service to Out of Town Motorists 
"CLUB" Service Our Specialty 

735-751 Post Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2280 



REPUBLIC 
STAGGARD TREAD 

Quality Tires for 
Quality People 

REPUBLIC RUBBER CO., of Cal. 



295 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



If you want to prolong the lift 
of your engine. 

If you want to eliminate smok 
and carbon, 
» it r-r~\ i— » t If you want to reduce your oil 

Mo 1 oRoL - pense - 

Uee MoToRoL 
''It suits because It doesn't soot" 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

S30 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 


There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich JS. Tiros 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 


Full factory equipment on .11 Pack- 

1 1 ur^rwfCD »> *rdi, Oldsmoblles, Coles. Thomas and 

ntJdVCK Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 

Full set of four — Sii to $18. Under 

AUXILIARY SPRING & compression by heavy loads, rough 

u " ILmnl orrvmvj ex roadi or bumps. Under .11 conditions 

f-tiy-v^,^ .-. ^ .-v .^ i-. r- rides a s easy as on asphalt. Impos- 

SHOOK ABSORBER slble to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
617 Turk St., San Francisco 


PEART & ELKINGTON 

VULCANIZING «.•». m.™ .,70 

42 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Ctl. 


LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Agents 
637-39-41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 
CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 


FREE FROM CARBON 
PANHARD L. H. * B. I. BILL 

/'"N T T 643 Qolden Gate Ave. 
^-^ "^ San Francisco, Cal. 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



The Comfort Car 

"For comfort in touring, take a medium weight car," says 
William S. Jenks, 8 South Dearborn street, Chicago. And 
Jenks really ought to know, for he took a Buick with him to 
Naples a year ago last February, and after clambering around 
on mountains for four months, came back to America with a 
record of only four punctures and no blowouts. He says : 

"I sailed on the 15th to Naples, with the original five tires 
which came with the car, also taking along four new Goodyear 
tires for use in case of need. Soon after leaving Naples I put 
on two of the new ones, non-skids, and the remaining two new 
ones came home in June untouched. 

"I traveled with my wife and an Italian helper over the 
famous drives around Naples, then on to Rome, Florence, Ge- 
noa, Italian and French Rivieras, up through the Rhone Valley 
in France to Lyons, then to Geneva, Switzerland, and partly 
through that country, as it was too early for mountain passes, 
going into Germany, as far as Berlin, then over to Rotterdam 
and Holland, from there to London and Liverpool, and sailed 
for home on the 12th of June. 

"You will notice that we took the trip in a leisurely manner, 
and covered 3,150 miles, much of which was up and down 
steep grades, although the greatest height was probably not 
over 2,500 feet. The tires were old and the stones sharp in 
many places, but we had only five punctures and no blow-outs, 
a very good record for the tires, as well as showing the advan- 
tage of a medium-weight car for touring purposes. 

"While many of the large cars were required to carry an ex- 
tra supply of gasoline on account of small mileage obtained 
per gallon, we didn't. Our expense for gasoline was $120, and 
the car went through beautifully with a perfect score." 

Jenks, who has had his Buick three years, says all he has 
ever renewed are the magneto points. 

Great Year 

The Republic Staggard Tread is the world's greatest all the 
year round non-skid tire. It is the original non-skid, as the 
patent dates (Sept. 15-22, 1908), so conclusively testify, and 
evidence of its popularity and serviceability is shown by the 
fact that there are so many imitations. Built on scientific lines, 
its six rows of long, tough studs grip the roadway, thus re- 
ducing the dangers of skidding to a minimum. It contains 
the highest grade of rubber and fabric, and its record as a 

mileage tire stands without an equal. 

• * • 

How to Use Chains 

"When tire chains become necessary to give traction, as in 
snow or mud, remember that a single chain is as bad as none," 
says Norman Cowan, of Hughson & Merton, agents for Weed 
chains. "Both rear wheels must be provided with chains if 
any benefit is to be obtained from them. Placing a chain on 
but one wheel produces a condition similar to that when one 
wheel is on a firm surface and the other is on a slippery one. 

"In this case the less traction transmits little or no power 
to the one wheel that is able to drive the car. Use tire chains 

on both wheels." 

* » * 

Strong In Sleep 

Mr. Murphy, branch manager of the Goodrich Rubber Com- 
pany at Atlanta, Georgia, was operated on for appendicitis on 
April 11th at the Kensington Hospital for Women at Phila- 
delphia. At the time he was taken down, he had just been 
made manager of the Atlanta branch, and accordingly was 
burdened not only with the cares of his new position, but at 
the same time trying to move his family from Philadelphia. 
He worried continually about his business, and even repeated 
assurances from both the factory and Mr. Simpson that every- 
thing would be taken care of, and that he need not worry, did 
not seem to relieve his mind. His last words as he went under 
the influence of ether were concerning his business. After the 
operation was over, however, and the effects of the ether were 
leaving him, he was very quiet, unusually so, until all at once 
he sat up straight in bed, threw out his hands, and declared : 
"I am a Goodrich man, I am. I sell Goodrich tries, I do; and 
let me tell you, my friend, that this is certainly a Goodrich 
year." The nurse reported that he concluded with a regular 
first-class selling talk, and when he finished, she was sorry she 
did not own half a dozen cars, so that she could place an 
order. 



MACHINE WORK 
BLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 



J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM, 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



ED. F. HENDRICKS 
Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave. 
At Gough St., San Francisco 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

FRANCIS BROS., Managers 
NEW ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF GARAGE 



PHONE 
PROSPECT 1915 



1120 POST STREET 

Near Van Ness Avenue 




Comfort is the Constant 

Companion of all who 

Motor with the 

Truffault - ffarfford 

SHOCK ABSORBER 

"The Pioneer and The Best" 



Take your boulevard with you ! 

Equip your car with the Truffault- 
Hartford Shock Absorber. 
No bump, no jump, no racking to pieces 
— instead, a gentle wave-like motion 
that makes motoring a new delight. 

The Truffault-Hartford is a silent but constant 
economizer. Stops tires from fighting the 
road— saves engine adjustments— keeps your car 
body out of the repair shop. Tweniy-tive of the 
country's greatest motor car companies testify 
to these facts by making the Truffault-Hartford 
part of their standard equipment. 

Make it part of yours. 
Four models, S16, t3S, JS0, S60. Any car. 
Send for Catalog. Send now — today. 

Insist Upon Truffluil'Harlfords on Your New Car 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION CO. 

EDWARD V. HARTFORD. Prcs. 
Office and Works: 174 Bay St., Jersey City, N. J. 



DISTRIBUTORS 

CHANSL0R & LYON CO. 




28 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



XSk, Vm^of-Yomfa Allans 



T wo Irish Armies. 

The movement to organize the Ulster volunteers to fight 
home rule in Ireland is met by the counter check quarrelsome 
by the enrollment of a much larger army of nationalist sup- 
porters. By June 1st, a force of 130,000 men was claimed, and 
recruits were coming in at the rate of 5,000 a week. The 
majority are not yet armed, but the work of providing arms is 
going on, and a manifesto has been issued by the provisional 
executive which asserts that the right of a free people to carry 
arms in defense of their freedom is an elementary fact of 
political history. The manifesto adds : "Since the action 'of 
the government places in the way of Irishmen favorable to 
national autonomy obstacles which admittedly are inopera- 
tive in the case of those opposed to the policy of Irish self- 
government, we demand the immediate withdrawal of the pro- 
clamation prohibiting the importation of arms.' " 

The immediate cause of the movement is plain enough; it is 
by way of answer to Sir Edward Carson's unionist volunteers. 
T. P. O'Connor says that the incident at the Curragh was 
largely responsible, that it made the Irish see that they must 
defend themselves. 

But what is the program of the volunteers, and who is to 
command them? The question is given fresh importance by 
John Redmond's clash with the provisional committee. A ma- 
jority of its members, he says, are not supporters of the Irish 
party. What then do they support? To judge from some 
speeches they are ardent pacificists. T. P. O'Connor says: 

"It is also one of the curiosities of this movement that it ex- 
cites as much interest and sympathy among English liberals 
as among Irishmen. It is known that several men among the 
liberal leaders have expressed satisfaction at the inception and 
growth of the movement. That is a curiosity of politics, cer- 



tainly; settling a political controversy by force of arms is not 
very good liberal doctrine, and a good home ruler might legiti- 
mately object to copying Carson's methods. But the liberal 
sympathizers in England have apparently persuaded them- 
selves that the new movement is all brotherly love, that it 
means a happy blending of the orange and green." 

The London Daily Chronicle says : "Further evidence of the 
desire on the part of the Nationalist volunteers to join hands 
with the Ulster volunteers in order to solve the Irish problem 
was furnished by an incident to-day at the Kingston urban 
district council." The incident was small enough, being sim- 
ply the passage of a resolution in which the chairman de- 
clared orange and green to have blended. On the other hand, 
at Limerick, Mr. London, member of Parliament, was quoted 
as speaking in a public meeting to this effect: 

"Mr. London added that when the Tory party returned to 
power they might possibly be for giving better terms to Ul- 
ster, but the Irish party could turn to the volunteers and say: 

'You leave the bill on the statute book, or else " They knew 

the "else" themselves. Whether they had to face Carson or 
England armed, they would be ready. They were willing to 
be friends with those opposed to them in the past, but if they 
had to defend their rights they would do so, knowing that they 
had the great democracy of the British Empire and the young 
men and manhood of Ireland with them. 

The London Chronicle says: "Another prominent Nationalist 
said yesterday at Limerick that the National volunteers were 
looking forward to the early day when the National volunteers 
and the Ulster volunteers would join hands in the general 
interest of the country. This is the wish and the hope of the 
great majority of Irish Nationalists." That may have a 
pacific meaning or it may not. The Chronicle's correspondent 
adds: 

"The movement is becoming more important and significant 
every day, and the step taken by the organizers in making an 
order against political demonstrations has been received by 
Nationalists with great approval; and, in fact, paradoxical as 
it may seem, the desire of the National volunteers is to join 
hands with the Ulster volunteers in order to solve the Irish 
problem. This is seen from the speeches made at many Irish 



SHASTA REGION 

Hotels in Picturesque Surroundings 
Cottages with Hotel Service Camps with Log Cabins and Tents 

Trout Fishing 

In Upper Sacramento, Pitt and McCloud Rivers 

Resorts : 

Shasta Springs, Lamoine, Sims, Sweet Briar, Cast- 
ella, Castle Rock, Castle Crag, Dunsmuir, Upper 
Soda Springs, Shasta Retreat, Sisson, McCloud, Etc. 



Only a Night's Ride From San Francisco, 
Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 



Reduced Round Trip and Week-End 
Excursion Fares 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Nationalist volunteer meetings to form corps of the volunteers. 
For instance, at a meeting at Loughguile, in Antrim, of Irish 
Nationalist volunteers, L. Walsh declared that Sir Edward 
Carson had struck a most effective blow for Irish freedom 
when he made it possible for Irishmen to arm in defense of 
their country. In effect, he said that Ireland's fate must be 
decided by Irishmen, and not by the way in which English 
people voted at general elections. Mr. Walsh concluded his 
speech by saying that no provisional government would be set 
up in his part of the country." 

• • • 

The Mexican of To-Day. 

Peter MacQueen, in the National Magazine, tells about the 
people of Mexico : 

"The meeting of the Spaniard and the Aztec was the meeting 
of two angry' tides in a maelstrom, for the Spaniard super- 
imposed ferocity upon the cruelty of the Aztec. Thus ferocity 
and cruelty for four hundred years have marked the bloody 
drama of Mexican history. For three hundred years Mexico 
was ruled by the rapacious viceroys of old Spain. Then, un- 
der the guise of 'liberty, equality, justice,' followed the long 
line of dictators, who have led their tortured land into the 
shocking condition we witness to-day. Mexico, though a re- 
public since 1821, with a constitution which reads almost word 
for word like our own, had never had a really free government. 

"The average Mexican to-day is not as intelligent as his 
Aztec forefathers. Out of a population of fifteen millions, 
twelve millions can neither read nor write. This is worse than 
Russia in the days before Peter the Great. The peons of 
Mexico are either Aztec Indians or half-breed Spanish and Az- 
tec. The half-breed Spaniard, whether in Cuba, South Amer- 
ica or the Philippines, never amounted to anything. He is 
worse in Mexico. He is the curse of God on Spanish misrule. 
In the conquest of Mexico and Peru, the Spaniards killed 
millions of the natives in less than fifty years. They slaugh- 
tered the best of the races they wished to subdue — completely 
annihilated a civilization that was more advanced in many 
ways than that of Europe." 

• * * 

British Exhibits at the Fair. 

Mr. Goode, secretary of the British committee of the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition, has sailed for San Francisco to confer 
with the authorities as to the best means of enabling British 
exhibitors to participate in the exhibition. The step was taken, 
Mr. Goode said in an interview with a reporter, as the result of 
the government's final decision not to participate officially. 
The committee's proposals had, he continued, received the most 
cordial consideration by the San Francisco authorities. 



When you have a party at your home you will give your 

friends a better time by treating them to a real old-fashioned 
Kentucky cocktail, made with "Old Forester" whisky. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



NOW READY 
"VACATION 1914" 



The Guide to 



Summer Outing Places 



Tributary to the 



Northwestern Pacific Railroad 

Make your vacation plans beforehand by consulting 
its pages. Profuse illustration and reliable descriptive 
text afford an instructive and reliable guide to this in- 
viting VACATION LAND, lying in Marin, Sonoma, Men- 
docino, Lake and Humboldt counties. It contains a 
complete list of Hotels, Town and Rural Homes and 
Camp Resorts. 

Copies of "VACATION" may be had free at 874 
Market Street (Flood Buildingi. Sausalito Ferry Ticket 
Office, or on application to 

J. J. GEARY, G. P. 4. F. A. 



808 PHELAIM BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 




Off We Go 

for the best time of 

our lives with our 

ordinary row boat 

and a sturdy little 

Caille Portable Boat 

Motor. It takes 

us skimming over 

river and lake at 

the rate of 7 to 9 

miles an hour or slow enough to troll 

The sturdy, dependable little 



'Portable 




Boat Motor 

attaches to any row boat by simply 
turning two thumb screws. Develops 
2 H. P. and weighs but 55 lbs. and 
starts with half a turn of the flywheel. 
It is steered with a rudder ^^ 
like a launch. Embodies fiSf 
more features of real merit *■ 
than any other similar 
motor on the 
market. Let 
us prove it. 




T. W. HOBRON CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS FOR CALIFORNIA 

68 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you In your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 



Importers of and Dealers in 



The Highest Class P/\ PER 

Battery and Jackson Streets 



For Office Stationery 
San Francisco, Cal. 



BRUSHES Sea 3 , 



Sacramento Street, between 
rny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and mad* 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets, Chamois. Metal 

Poller, and Cleaning: Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Ask jour 
Dealer (or 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
I. B. PEASE. Preektaal M*. Ml. SW Market Si. 




The best aaa 

itronf.it 
Garden Has* 

Guaranteed t. 

staad 700 lbs 

Preesare 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

Saa Fn 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

U FIRST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 
Phonea: Kearny 392 J 1518 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WIIH 



White Diamond Water Company, Inc. 

Pure Water for Oakland. Alameda. Berkeley 

utely sanitary water, neither boiled, rllsu 

hut tiart.?riolos;iraIlr purified t.y eleetrirn 

FRB8H KACH WEEK, tl.-'ai per month. sinrle S gii'. 10 centa. 

Phones: Piedmont 1 720 and Home A 86792 
5736 Telegraph Ave., opp. Idora Park Oakland, Cal. 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 



Speculators and Investors 

ATTENTION 

By order of the SUPERIOR COURT I will 
offer at Public Auction Thursday, July 16th, 
at 12 o'clock noon at our salesroom, 41 
Montgomery Street, the choice 

BUSINESS HOLDING 

S. E. Cor. Fourth and Tehama Streets 

Near Howard St. 

SIZE — 80 by 73 

For further particulars apply to 

DAN O'CALLAGHAN 

Sole Referee 41 Montgomery Street 



' 'Uhe Jiristocrat " 


J| PREMIER 




to 15 Year Old Scotch Whisky 




JHI 


WITH 






BETHESDA 




i 


WATER 




A Perfect Blend 




IS* 


THOS. W. COLLINS COMPANY 

AGENTS 
34 Davis Street San Frincisco 




Fast Electric Trains 



TO 



Sacramento 



The Wonder Trip 

Entire line equipped with Automatic Block Signals. 
Observation cars operated. Safe — Quick. 

Oakland Antioch & Eastern Railway 

San Francisco Depot — Key Route Ferry 
Phone Sutter 2339 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



Members <| 


New York Stock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange. San Francisco 


Offices 
MILLS BUILDING 


Branch Offices 


and 
PALACE HOTEL 


Los Angeles San Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland. Ore 
Seattle, Wash. 






UT1NANCIAV 



It is announced that the July cou- 
People's Water Company, pons of the Contra Costa Water 

Company, the Alameda Artesian 
Water Company, the East Shore Water Company, and the Peo- 
ple's Water Company, including interest on the notes of the 
latter, would not be paid. The reasons for withholding the in- 
terest on the underlying bonds are fully set forth in a statement 
issued by the refunding committee of the company, which 
says: 

"In order to bring squarely before the parties in interest the 
imperative necessity of prompt and concerted action to pre- 
serve values now plainly in jeopardy, the refunding committee 
of the People's Water Company has recommended to the board 
of directors that the company default in its interest payments 
due July 1st, on the bonds of the People's Water Company 
and the underlying issues as well. 

"These bonds in their respective amounts are as follows : 
Underlying bonds — Contra Costa Water Co., 1st mortgage 5 
per cent bonds, under trust deed dated November 1, 1894, 
$2,000,000; Oakland Water Co., 1st mortgage 5 per cent bonds, 
under trust deed dated May 1, 1899, $1,500,000; Alameda Ar- 
tesian Water Co., 1st mortgage 5 per cent bonds, under trust 
deed dated February 1, 1900, $600,000; East Shore Water Co., 
1st mortgage 5 per cent bonds, under trust deed dated June 15, 
1900, $500,000; Contra Costa Watetr Co., 2d mortgage 5 per 
cent bonds, under trust deed dated May 5, 1903, $1,000,000; 
total, $5,600,000; General Mortgage bonds, People's Water 
Co., $7,149,000; total outstanding bonds, $12,749,000. 

"Anticipating possible objections, especially from the hold- 
ers of the underlying issues, the committee desires to explain 
fully a condition whereunder it becomes expedient, even abso- 
lutely necessary, for this corporation, whose solvency is un- 
questioned, and whose operations return a satisfactory and in- 
creasing profit, to take such a course. 

"It is because there is a community of interest among the 
persons financially interested which must be realized, and 
which, if once fully understood, the committee believes will 
make possible a complete financial reorganization of the Peo- 
ple's Water Company on a permanently sound basis and ulti- 
mately safeguard the values which are now menaced. 

"The committee desires to explain at the outset that it could 
not discriminate as between the holders of the bonds of the 
People's Water Company and the holders of the underlying 
bonds. To pay the interest on the underlying bonds and not to 
pay on the bonds of the People's Water Company would per- 
mit the holders of the latter securities to commence foreclo- 
sure proceedings, and as no default had occurred in any of the 
underlying issues no similar action could be taken by the hold- 
ers of these securities. Accordingly, the committee has recom- 
mended default of all interest payments, so that in the event 
foreclosure proceedings are instituted under the terms of the 
trust deeds, no body of bondholders will be at a disadvantage. 
Briefly, the situation is as follows : "The underlying bonds in 
the total amount of $5,600,000 will mature on January 1, 1915, 
and no adequate provision has been made or can be made 
within that time for their redemption. 

"There is a floating debt of approximately $3,295,000, the 
greater part of which is represented by short term notes, for 
which treasury bonds of the People's Water Company general 
mortgage issue are pledged on a basis of two and one-half 
to one. 

"There are outstanding general mortgage bonds of the Peo- 
ple's Water Company of approximately $7,149,000, the value 
of which would be seriously impaired if the note-holders exer- 
cised their option and continued to sell the securities pledged 
with them, without consideration for the company's equity. 

"Furthermore, the State Railroad Commission has directed 
the committee to prepare at once a plan of reorganization for 
its approval, with insistence that under no circumstances should 
the financial problems of the company be permitted to affect 
the service provided for its patrons in Alameda County. 

"On the operating side the condition of the company is fun- 






July 4, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



damentally sound, as shown by the following statement: Gross 
income for year 1913, $1,650,045.77; less operating expense, 
$627,245.53— total $1,022,800.24; less interest and fixed charges 
$821,327.14, showing a net income (except depreciation) of 
$201,473.10. 

"For the year beginning July 1, 1914, the estimated earnings 
and expenses of the company are as follows : Gross income, 
$1,700,000; less operating expenses ($450,000), less taxes 
($150,000)— total $1,100,000; less interest and fixed charges, 
$800,000, showing a net income of $300,000. 



To Buy the 
United Railroads. 



It is suggested that the city of San 
Francisco should take over the 
United Railroads, its franchises and 
physical property, and the plan 
proposed has been approved by President Jesse W. Lilienthal 
of the street car corporation. The plan is thus outlined: 

"There will be no bond issue. The city intends to pay for 
the property out of its earnings. 

First of all there will be an appraisal of the physical prop- 
erty. This will be followed by an appraisal of the franchises. 
The principal franchises expire in 1929, although there are 
others that expire at intervals until 1952. 

It will be proposed to pay the company an amount equal to 
the sum of these two appraisals, giving a guarantee of interest 
at a reasonable rate. 

The property is then to be operated by the city, the exten- 
sions made by the city, maintenance to be cared for by the 
city. All of the net profits are to be devoted to extinguishing 
the debt due the United Railroads. 

A charter amendment will be necessary to put this plan into 
execution. 



McCutchen, Olney & Willard, rep- 

Natomas Finance. resenting large holders of Natomas 

first mortgage bonds, have issued a 

statement in opposition to the pending plan of reorganization. 

They say: 

"The principal objection to the plan is that it prefers floating 
debt creditors over first mortgage bondholders. It may be 
taken for granted that bond holders will be glad to join in a 
plan of reorganization which safeguards and protects the 
claims of those having liens upon the property, but a reorgani- 
zation which prefers floating debt creditors over mortgage bond 
holders is novel and, indeed, unheard of. The situation, there- 
fore, as between the floating debt creditor, whose debt is not 
secured by a lien upon the property, and the present first mort- 
gage bondholder, whose debt is supposed to be secured, is that, 
whereas the first mortgage bondholder is asked to scale his 
secured claim to 60 per cent of its present par value, the float- 
ing debt creditor is given ninety day notes for the amount of 
his claim and interest, or five year gold notes equal to 111 per 
cent of such claim, with interest, secured by a first lien. Of 
course, the ninety day notes will be redeemed with proceeds 
of the sale of the five year notes. The answer to this will be 
that the bondholder gets more than 60 per cent — that is to say. 
that he gets 40 per cent in preferred stock." 



The trustees of F. M. Smith's prop- 
Three Million Cash. erties announced this week that 

they had received $3,000,000 from 
the sale of his borax securities, the other $1,000,000 to be paid 
in sixty days. John Drum, speaking for his associates, said it 
would not be possible to complete the distribution of this sum 
in less than thirty to sixty days. In this connection he said: 
"The money cannot be distributed pro rata to the Smith note- 
holders, but must be distributed pro rata to the borax collateral 
securing those notes. Some of the note holders have borax 
collateral exclusively; others have none; while others have 
mixed collateral. For this reason the computations and tabu- 
lations will take considerable time." 



NEW PARISIAN FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. C. La FON 

First Class Work at Reasonable Prices 

Laces and Lace Curtains a Specialty 

Club. Restaurant and Hotel Service 



OLD FORESTER 

"Its all old straight whisky." 
Sold by all dealers, clubs, etc. 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. 

SUTTER AT POWELL 
DISTRIBUTORS 




"MONARCH" p^, 

are never our of order because they 
are made right, of best materials, by 
skilled mechanics. They give high- 
est efficiency. Write for special 
proposition — we can save you money. 

MONARCH FOUNDRY CO. 

STOCKTON, CAL. 

OR 

T. W. HOBRON COMPANY 

Pumps and Gas Engines 
68 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



L. & S. CEMENT PAINT 

FIRE RETARDENT ACID PROOF WATER PROOF 

Adheres to any surface. Secures re- 
duction in insurance rate. An ideal 
protection for wood, black or galvan- 
ized iron, concrete or brick. Made in 
any color. 

Manufactured by 

PAINT PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

LAIRD & SINCLAIR 

DISTRIBUTORS 
Telephone Suiter 1967 Sharon Building. San Francisco 



Blake. Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 2230 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 4, 1914. 




"What are you fishing for, my lad?" "Fish." "What 

kind offish?" "Fresh." — Boston Transcript. 

"I suppose, Miss, you are dreaming of spring?" "Oh, 

yes; because all around me is so green?" — Simplissimus. 

Maud — Oh, doctor, how low the sun is this evening! 

M. D. — Yes, I fear he will not survive the night. — Le Hire. 

Suitor — I want to marry your daughter. Father — Can 

you divorce her in the manner to which she has been accus- 
tomed? — New York Sun. 

First Lady — Too bad ! Mrs. S. always has such abomi- 
nable weather for her afternoon teas. Second Lady — Yes; 
she never pours but it rains. — Tit-Bits. 

"The .-arly bird catches the worm," observed the sage. 

"Yes," replied the fool, "but look how much longer he has to 
wait for dinner time." — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

Old Gentleman — So you're a caricaturist, eh? Well, I 

suppose there's something funny about all our faces if you 
take the trouble to look for it. — London Opinion. 

She — I shan't give you anything because I suspect you 

aren't blind at all. He — That may be, but I can assure you 
there are moments when I wish I were. — Pele Mele. 

Scott — How is it that you never go away during your 

summer vacations ? Mott — I don't need to. Most of the bores 
leave town, and in their absence I have a grand, restful time. 
— Boston Transcript. 

She — Lizzie's bloke calls 'er 'is peach and the happle 

of 'is heye. Why can't you call me things like that? He — 
Yus, that's very well; but 'e's in the vegetable business. Hi'm 
in the fish trade, remember. — Punch. 

Mr. Johnsing — Say, Mr. Dorman, what am de meaning 

of dis here line on de ticket whar it says, "Not transferable?" 
Mr. Dorman — Dat means, Bre'r Johnsing, dat no gen'leman am 
admitted unlesen he comes hisself. — Ex. 

"Tell me about your aunt, old Mrs. Blank. She must 

be rather feeble now." "We buried her last year," said the 
other. "Buried her? Dear me! Is the old lady dead?" "Yes; 
that's why we buried her," was the response. — Tit-Bits. 

"No!" said papa, "don't disturb me. You can's have 

it." "Oh, boo-hoo! boo-hoo!" wailed the small boy. "Stop, 
stop," cried papa, distracted. "Now, then, if I let you play 
your drum, will you be quiet?" — The Normal Instructor. 

She — I don't see why I ever married you. He — Oh, you 

were glad enough to get anybody, I guess. You were no young 
bird when I married you. She — No, but considering what I 
got, I was an early bird. — Boston Transcript. 

"I say, dad, I've just accepted Charlie Brown — he's in 

the drawing room — and if you've a minute, you might pop in 
and see him, and talk it over; but please be quick: we've got 
to rush out and see about the banns." — London Opinion. 

Physician — This man's condition is not due to drink. 

He's been drugged. Policeman (turning pale and speaking 
timidly) — I'm afraid ye're right, sir. I drugged him all the 
way — a matter of a hundred yards or more. — Pearson's. 

Weary Walker — No, mum, I ain't dirty from choice. I 

am bound by honor. Yer see I once wrote a testimonial for 
a soap maker, and promised to use no other. Madam — Well, 
why don't you use that? Weary Walker — Because, mum, the 
firm failed about five years ago. — Boston Transcript. 

"A great deal of what we call pleasure is largely imagi- 
nary," said the ready-made philosopher. "I suppose so," re- 
plied the man who was working on his automobile. "Now, 
wouldn't you like to be able to take a long ride without having 
to worry about speed limits or spark plugs or tires or anything 
like that?" "I should say so." "Well, here's a street car 
ticket." — Washington Star. 







The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone: Franklin 2960 




MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 Ellis Street 47 Glasgow Street 

Phone Douglas 1CM0 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

50c 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR SI. 00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 

Music Every Evening 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkln 
Streets 



Phone Franklin » 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



J. Bergez 



C. Mailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bush St., San Francisco (Above Kearny) Exchange. Douglas 2411 



Phone Sutter 1572 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittman 
C. Lahederne 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, $1.00. Banquet Halls and 
Private Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening, 

362 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




Help Your Eyes 

BY USING 
Mayerle's glasses. They are highly recommended for 
weak eyes, poor sight, strained, tired, itchy, watery, 
inflani'-d. gluey eyes, floating spots, crusty or granu- 
lated eyelids, crossed eyes, astigmatism, headache, 
children's '-ye> and complicated cases. 

Two gold medals and diplomas of honor awarded al California Industry 
Exposition, also al Mechanics' Fair. October, 19X8. to 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician; Established 20 Years. %0 Market Street, 
Opposite Empress Theater, San Francisco. Mayerle's eyewater 50c„by 



'""■M I**** , 



ENGLEBERT TYRES 



"MADE IN BELGIUM" 



For Motorists who seek lowest tyre cost 
per mile, and freedom from tyre troubles. 



CO 

N 
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Oh 

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3 

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> 

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DO 

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PI 

CO 



Now that the great-mileage-giving-tyre of Europs is available, the dis- 
criminating and economical motorist can no longer afford 
to use tyres of ordinary make. 



ENGLEBERT— THE TYRE OF 10,000 MILES 



COSTELLO-LANG COMPANY 



556 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

PHONE PROSPECT 121 SAN FRANCISCO 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiramnirfn~" 




MARMON "41" TOURING CAR 



AN EXTRAORDINARY CAR 

Backed, not merely by what we "claim" for it, but, by actual proof of 
value, comes this new Marmon "Forty-One." 

The Marmon is sold — not merely on what the manufacturer or dealer 
"says" but on the actual proof of the car itself. 

The new Marmon "Forty-One" is now ready to bring you its own proof 
of value. 

WALTER C. MORRIS 



Distributer 



GEARY AT POLK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PRICE 10 CENTS SATURDAY, JULY 11 1914 $4.00 A YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA AWERTOER 




C^QIRASOL 



t 



SANTA B 




M 

iALQWS*% 



A-TYPL-9F-TH£-BE5T-xSrtALL-ENGLISH' 

HOTEL-^XJRR^UNDLD-BY-BUNCiALOWS 

AND -A- PRIVATE. -PARK- F9R 

INFQMATIQN -ADDRESS -0-P-M&ALLASTE.R 
-5ANTA -BARBARA CALIFORNIA 




AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



BANK OF 
NEW SOUTH WALES 



{ESTABLISHED 1S17) 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Reserve Liability -of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets 30th 
September, 1913 




- $17,500,000 

11,750,000 

- 17,500,000 
. $46,750,000 

$236,841,080.26 



J. RUSSELL FRENCH, General Manager 



33G BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australia States. New Zealand, 
Fiji Papua (Now Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every 
description of Australian Banking Business. Wool and Produce Credits 
Arranged. 

Head Olfice: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 



ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 



II 



n * 




SAN FRANCISCO 


Paid-up Capital 




14,000.1 00 


Satplui and Undivided ProBta $1,600,000 


lota! Tlt'sourees 




$40,00(1.000 


OFFICERS: 




BKRBERT FLE1SHHACKER 


President 


SIG. GREENEBAUM Chu 




nn of Hie Board 


WASHINGTON DODGE 




Vlco-Preiident 


JOS. FRIfPLANDER 




Vice-President 


C. F. HUNT 




Vico-Prenident 


R. ALTSCHl'L 




Cashier 


C. R. PARKER 


Ab 


Bittant C'Biliicr 


WM. H, HIGH 


A 


^istunt Cashier 


H. CHOYNSKI 


Assistant ' 


G. R. BURDICK 


A 


si^tnut C'ldliier 


A. L. LANGERMAN 




Secretary 



| M 


" 'Uhe jJristocrat" 


/ m 


PREMIER 




15 Year Old Scotch Whisky 




WITH 


PREMIER 

1 


BETHESDA 

WATER 


FINEST 


A Perfect Blend 


THOS. W. COLLINS COMPANY 


\w$ 


AGENTS 
34 Davis Street San Francisco 1 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HIAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.0..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

•T.EXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

jjHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1867 
Paid-up Capital $15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 13,500,000 

Aggregate Resource 260,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a moat 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are la- 
sued in denominationa of 



$10 



$20 



$50 



AND 



$100 



and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway. Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldeadorff 



L & S. CEMENT PAINT 

FIRE RETARDENT ACID PROOF WATERPROOF 

Adheres to any surface. Secures re- 
duction in insurance rate. An ideal 
protection for wood, black or galvan- 
ized iron, concrete or brick. Made in 
any color. 

Manufactured by 

PAINT PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

LAIRD &, SINCLAIR 

DISTRIBUTORS 
Telephone Sutter 1967 Sharon Building, San Francisco 



The German Savings & Loan Society 



Savings 



Commercial 



(The German Bank) 
Incorporated 1868 
526 CALIFORNIA ST, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of Sao Francisco 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY: 

MISSION BRANCH S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH S. W. Cor. Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH S. W. Cor. Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1914 

Assets $ 58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

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NEW ADAMS BUILDING, 61 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

SAN FRANCISCO LO S ANGELES 

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EtUUlahtd July tO. 1U4 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 11, 1914 



No. 2 



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Have you a wife in parenthesis? 

What is a political "bohunk?" Ask Frank Jordan. 

Were you divorced by directory, or don't you care? 

Mayfield is the only town on the peninsula which will 

not build a decent road. 

The volcano industry thrives. Bill Bush, a Modoc In- 
dian, is doing a smart business selling boiled rocks to tourists 
as hot lava fresh from the crater. 

Where is that $2,000,000 slush fund that Governor John- 
son said the standpat Republicans were about to let loose? 
The State committee of the party has been ejected from its 
home for non-payment of rent. Can it be that Hiram Johnson 
is careless about the truth? 

Mayor Albie, of Portland, Ore., bans the X-ray skirt, 

and orders the wearers arrested on sight. "Really," opined the 
Mayor, "I have been afraid, judging by reports brought to me, 
that there was danger of some of our younger ladies becoming 
sunburned. We must take no such risk." 

Berkeley has a municipal institution known as the "weed 

list," being the police roll of delinquent property owners who 
let weeds grow on their lots. At the head of the list last week 
appeared the City Attorney and the Mayor's wife. The Attor- 
ney explained that his weeds were too green to burn, and the 
Mayor's wife said she had sold hers. 

The perpetual squabble among the Federal departments 

is illustrated by the compromise agreement by which the war 
department retains jurisdiction over inland navigation, while the 
Interior Department controls the construction of dams. It is a 
clumsy and haphazard arrangement which partitions control of 
the rivers in order to satisfy bureaucratic jealousies. 

The envious Telegraph of Portland, Ore., sneers at our 

pet volcano, and says : "Just as everybody expected, Mt. Lassen 
has been made a star scenic attraction by the people of Cali- 
fornia. It needs but a casual scanning of the California papers 
to be convinced of this. They are as proud of that spouting 
mountain down there as if it were the only volcano on earth. 
They are glad that it is not a mere geyser as feared at first, but 
a full-grown, double-barreled eruption, fascinatingly beautiful 
to behold, yet warranted to be perfectly safe." 



The automobile has not altogether superceded the horse, 

and in fact army officials are to-day much concerned over the 
scarcity of horses for the cavalry. The lack of good horses was 
not really discovered until the beginning of the Mexican diffi- 
culties, and since then the government has been making various 
efforts to get more mounts. 

The bread that mother used to make is politely damned 

by Mrs. Mary Schenk Woolman, acting professor of household 
economics at Simmons' College, Boston, and member of the 
summer session faculty, in an address before the State High 
School Teachers' Association in convention at the State Uni- 
versity. "I don't eat home-made bread myself," said Dr. Wool- 
man, "and I don't expect any one else to do so." 

Los Angeles knows how to advertise. Last week the 

budget committee of the 1915 general committee on enter- 
tainment submitted a budget estimate of $632,100 to the general 
committee at its meeting in the Chamber of Commerce. Some 
of the largest items are: Entertainment committee, $200,000; 
beautifying Los Angeles County, $75,000; beautifying Los An- 
geles city, $50,000; floral display, $64,500; music, $50,000; au- 
tomobiles, $47,000. 

The country wife is to study art for art's sake. Mrs. J. 

B. Hughes, chairman of the art section of the northern district, 
California Federation of Women's Clubs, and originator of the 
art section system in country clubs, with systematic study fur- 
nished from her headquarters, is to blame. "Art study," says 
Mrs. Hughes, "has a notable effect on the furniture, the wall 
paper, and even the Easter bonnets of the women in the rural 
communities, and this, it seems to me, is one of the things of 
prime importance in the work of uplift and the advancement of 
art." 

Secretary of State Frank C. Jordan brands those who 

seek nominations from parties other than their own as political 
"bohunks" and interlopers. Jordan has been requested by 
Republican and State leaders to refuse acceptance to nomina- 
tion petitions of Progressive candidates circulated in an effort 
to get their names on the Democratic or Republican primary 
ballots as well as that of their own party. The amiable sec- 
retary appears to have just discovered that politics is not a 
gentleman's game. Can you beat it? 

Believing that woman and girls go astray in Los An- 
geles, and many from the Far East are inveigled into leaving 
their homes in response to exaggerated and luring letters, thirty- 
three prominent residents of Los Angeles, Pasadena, Alham- 
bra and La Canada have filed articles of incorporation with 
Secretary of State Jordan, organized the Travelers' Aid Society, 
which has for its principal purpose providing information, ad- 
vice, guidance and protection, particularly for women and girls, 
visitors to Los Angeles and the Southland. To the chemically 
pure, all things are impure. 



Former State Senator Estudillo, of 
The California Indians. Riverside, in a recent address de- 
livered in that town, told the dis- 
creditable story (in part) of the spoliation of the California 
Indian tribes since the American occupation. When the gold 
rush began, "the white man," said Senator Estudillo, "did not 
stop to inquire whether these Indians were industrious and 
civilized or were settled with farms and orchards and vine- 
yards on the land where they had peaceably maintained them- 
selves for years. When the gold rush began, the State of 
California was overrun by a horde of men, well armed and 
masterful. A large number of them had crossed the plains 
and fought battles with the Indians, and naturally enough 
looked upon the Indians of California in the same light that 
the white mer of those days looked upon all Indians. . . . The 
Indians had no show in the courts, for up to 1872 the evidence 
of an Indian was not admissible in a court of justice. And 
even to a late period in the history of California the Indians 
were punished by whipping." 

As in other States, so in California reservations were set 
aside for the Indians, but according to Mr. Estudillo, some 
were located on barren hills or waste land without water, and 
in addition the Indians did not get the price stipulated for the 
lands the government took in return. "The Osages and Chero- 
kees and other Eastern tribes," he says, "have received mil- 
lions of dollars for the same rights in land not nearly so valu- 
able, and no reason has been advanced why the California In- 
dians should not receive any compensation for their lands." 

Speaking of the reservation system as it has been worked out 
in California, Mr. Estudillo's conclusion is that it has not been 
a system of justice to the people it was supposed to help, be- 
cause it has discouraged self-reliance and taken away the 
incentive to real effort. He deplores the fact, too, that of late 
years these Indians on the reservations have been losing in- 
terest in their native arts because they receive almost no 
encouragement along these lines. 

3ST 

Our British Columbia neighbors on 
Pacific Coast the North, are taking hold of the 

Fur Farms. fur farming industry in an energetic 

way, as we learn from the consular 
reports, and are preparing to raise foxes on a commercial scale. 
Two companies have recently been organized and a third is 
being formed. The companies are being promoted by men ex- 
perienced in the business, and the ranches will be stocked with 
animals taken in the Province. As the foxes will be placed 
in captivity under conditions similar to those in which they 
live in their wild state, it is believed that better results will be 
obtained than have been secured from similar efforts in other 
localities. In Prince Edward Island, which is the home of the 
fur farming industry, many fortunes have been made, the reve- 
nue produced by taxation alone netting the Government of the 
island $37,000 last year. 

The largest profits are made in the breeding of silver tips 
and black and silver varieties. The production of these special 
varieties by crossbreeding is one of the secrets of the business. 
Recent experiments conducted in this Province by represen- 
tativs of the fur farming interests show that a higher percen- 
tage of the rare varieties can be secured in British Columbia 
than in the East. There is also a large number of wild foxes, 
and the more equable climate renders the rearing of the young 
foxes easier. 
The trapping of foxes is forbidden by the Game Act, except 



in the winter months, but the government has consented under 
the circumstances to issue special permits to responsible per- 
sons engaged in the fur farming business in British Columbia 
to enable them to trap foxes during the summer. These foxes 
are to be used only for breeding purposes within the province. 

Together with the news of the establishment of the fur farm- 
ing industry in British Columbia, it is announced that a trap- 
per in Fort George has succeeded in rearing marten in captiv- 
ity. The difficulty with these animals in the past has been 
that in captivity they quarrel and kill one another. As the 
trapper has succeeded in rearing two litters, which play like 
kittens, a study of his methods is expected to enable breeders 
to rear marten for the fur market. 

3BT 
An organized campaign is afoot to 
The Universal Eight defeat the pending proposition to 
Hour Law. make the eight hour day compul- 

sory in all industries, which will be 
submitted on referendum to the popular vote at the coming 
general election. It is announced on behalf of this propaganda 
that farmers all over the State are enrolling as members of 
the Farmers' Protective League, and in nearly a score of coun- 
ties branches of the League are either organized or being 
formed. In many instances the entire membership of farm 
bureaus and kindred organizations affiliate with the League. 

Mrs. Emily Hoppin, of Yolo County, a member of the board 
of directors of the League, has taken personal charge of the 
campaign among women voters to convince them of the dan- 
gers of the universal eight hour law, especially as it affects 
the agricultural interests of California. Mrs. Hoppin is a farmer 
and knows whereof she speaks. Mrs. Hoppin is widely known 
throughout the State, being vice-president of the Women's 
Federation of Clubs. 

"It is most important that women be made acquainted with 
the full meaning of the universal eight hour law," said Mrs. 
Hoppin, "and the women of the country districts must carry 
the message to their sisters in the cities. Women are always 
anxious to inform themselves upon political and economic 
affairs, and they readily accept the logical view on any ques- 
tion. I know that the women of California, once the facts are 
put before them, will realize that this proposed law would de- 
stroy utterly the farming industry of the State. 

"I want to make it especially clear that women workers who 
are now under the law limiting to eight hours their daily em- 
ployment, will not be benefited in the slightest if this proposed 
legislation is adopted. On the contrary, women would be 
harmed, because the cost of foodstuffs naturally would increase 
as production is decreased, which would happen if farmers 
are forced to observe the eight hour schedule." 

Women are not organizing separately, but become members 
of the branch League in their respective counties, and are par- 
ticipating actively in affairs of the organization. 

Too much of a good thing brought Mrs. A. R. Renner, of 

Berkeley to the threshold of the Great Perhaps. The pre- 
scription called for the swallowing of a tablet "every two 
hours." Apparently imbued with the idea that their efficiency 
might be increased by more frequent doses, Mrs. Renner 
swallowed one every fifteen minutes until she had taken fifteen 
and then it was time for the doctors, the police ambulance and 
the hospital, where the sufferer from too much zeal was re- 
lieved. 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



A Rift in the 
Progressive Lute, 



These Progressives, it seems, do 
not love each other to the degree 
that might be expected from a 
happy family fathered on spoils. 
Indeed, it appears that the apportionment among themselves of 
these same spoils is the cause and inspiration of the going un- 
pleasantness. As might have been expected, the battle over 
the United States Senatorial nomination between Heney and 
Rowell is the cause of woe among the divided faithful. 

It seems that Meyer Lissner, the fireless cooker of politics, 
has fallen out with his townsman, E. T. Earl, who publishes 
two daily papers in Los Angeles. Lissner is quoted in an in- 
terview published in the Fresno Republican, Rowell's paper, 
as saying in relation to the senatorial campaign : 

"Everywhere, save in one instance, both candidates seem 
to be getting a fairly square deal from the Progressive Press. 
The exception is in the city of Los Angeles, where the Express 
and Tribune, owned by Edwin T. Earl, the only Los Angeles 
dailies supporting the Progressive party, not alone do not give 
Mr. Rowell a square deal, but in fact do not give him any kind 
of a deal at all. The astounding fact is, that if Mr. Rowell had 
to depend upon Mr. Earl to convey information concerning his 
candidacy to the Los Angeles Progressives, the latter would 
not even know of the Rowell candidacy. The other papers, 
however, while under no obligation to support a Progressive 
candidate, do fulfill their obligation to their subscribers by 
giving Mr. Rowell very fair publicity. So that his candidacy 
is well advertised in Los Angeles, and is attracting large num- 
bers of loyal supporters. 

"The Earl spite against Rowell dates from the Municipal 
Conference, when, because some prominent Progressives, in- 
cluding myself, had to do with a really non-partisan movement 
in municipal politics which Mr. Earl disapproved of, he 
branded us publicly in his papers as traitors to the Progressive 
cause. Rowell, at that time, both to Mr. Earl personally and in 
The Republican, took the position that Earl's attack was ab- 
solutely unjustified; and that my friends and I might have made 
a mistake in judgment and that Mr. Earl might have been jus- 
tified in saying so much and in criticising us accordingly, al- 
though on the direct issue Mr. Rowell did not express a per- 
sonal opinion; but he held that to brand and flay us as Mr. 
Earl did, especially in consideration of our previous relations 
and services to the cause, was reprehensible and that Mr. Earl 
did not apologize for it. Mr. Earl did not apologize. Neither 
did he forgive Mr. Rowell, and the result is that he carries his 
grudge against Rowell into his newspapers, which are in reality 
his personal organs, and brings about the astounding condition 
where a candidate for such a highly important office as United 
States Senator in the Progressive Party is absolutely ignored 
because, forsooth, he has tread upon the toes of the proprietor 
of these papers." 

Lissner refuses to express any public preference for either 
Rowell or Heney, but the foregoing remarks indicate very 
clearly his opinion. The line up appears to be Johnson, Rowell 
and Lissner, as against Kent, Heney and Earl. 

IB- 

Competent authority in the naval 
Are Dreadnaights Jink? field now assures us that the vast 

expenditures of the nations on 
battleships are absolutely wasted or worse. Indeed, if Ad- 
miral Sir Percy Scott, of the British Navy, may be trusted, 
the Dreadnaught is chiefly dangerous to its crew. This is ex- 
pert opinion of the highest authority, because Admiral Scott 
knows Dreadnoughts and super-Dreadnoughts as few navai 
officers do; he has helped signally to improve their fighting- 
efficiency. Afloat and ashore he has had a brilliant career 



H<: was, until his retirement, one of the best scientific minds 
in the navy, and to him the navy owes its system of fire control 
and a vast increase in shooting efficiency. 

Now here is this high authority declaring that the Dread- 
naught is doomed. Indeed, he brings the very serious charge 
against those in authority of wasting the nation's money on 
ships that will be unable to fight. It is for them, he suggests, 
to defend that policy by explaining what part the battleship 
will play in war, how she can be made safe from destruction 
by the submarine at sea or in port, and how her situation is to 
be kept secret from aircraft. Instead of battleships, he would 
have the money voted for their construction spent on building 
more submarines and seaplanes. 

Writing to the London Times, Admiral Scott points out 
among other things that "the introduction of the vessels that 
swim under water has, in my opinion, entirely done away with 
the utility of the ships that swim on the top of the water. Sub- 
marines will make it impossible for warships to attack other 
ships that come to bombard our ports, to blockade us or to 
attack ships convoying a landing party. No man of war will 
dare to come even within sight of a coast adequately pro- 
tected by submarines. As to attacking the enemy's fleet: 
There will be no fleet to attack, as it will not be safe for a fleet 
to put to sea. This has been demonstrated in all recent maneu- 
vers at home and abroad where submarines have been em- 
ployed. If by submarines we close egress from the North Sea 
and Mediterranean, it is difficult to see how our commerce can 
be much interfered with. Submarines and aeroplanes have en- 
tirely revolutionized naval warfare; no fleet can hide itself 
from the aeroplane eye, and the submarine can deliver a deadly 
attack even in broad daylight. Naval officers of the future will 
therefore live either above the sea or under it. It will be a 
navy of youth, for we shall require nothing but boldness and 
daring. Not only is the open sea unsafe : a battleship is not 
immune from attack in even a closed harbor, for the so-called 
protecting boom at the entrance can be easily blown up. With 
a flotilla of submarines commanded by dashing young officers, 
of whom we have plenty, I would undertake to get through any 
boom into any harbor, and sink or materially damage all the 
ships in that harbor." 

In case of war, Admiral Scott thinks that "the country will 
at once lock up their Dreadnaughts in some safe harbor; we 
shall do the same; their aeroplanes and airships will fly over 
our country; they will know exactly where our ships are, and 
their submarines will come over and destroy them. We shall, 
of course, go the same, but an island with many harbors and 
much shipping is at a great disadvantage if the enemy has 
submarines." 

To this ignoble fate have these tremendous engines of war 
come down to be classed as a danger to the country and a 
waste of money. Something of this has before now been sus- 
pected by the intelligent layman. A years ago or more H. G. 
Well, writing of the modern battleship, said: "I would as soon 
go to sea in St. Paul's Cathedral," and he added that the wea- 
pons with which to fight them are submarines and aeroplanes. 
In fact, he closely forecasted Admiral Scott's expert conclu- 
sions. 



3T 



The Tyrant Man, it seems, has put his wife in parenthe- 
sis. This is a new form of bondage and a final survival of the 
subjection of women that cannot be tolerated in this enlight- 
ened age of feminine emancipation. We may expect to hear 
Dr. Anna Howard Shaw sacrificing the directory for classifying 
the San Francisco wife as a parenthetic appendix. And some 
of our husbands have lost their appendix. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Pioneer Mother's Clothes- Evolved from the Sculptor's Artistic Temperament — Habited 
Like Mrs Skinclothes-An Impossible Task— Encouragement for an Aspiring and Rejuven- 
ated Volcano-Back-Biting Mt. Lassen- Dry Nurse for a Mountain-Politics and Journalism 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



The pending controversy — more or less acid — over the fash- 
ion in which the effigy of the Pioneer Mother shall be clothed 
serves to illustrate the insuperable difficulties that hamper the 
sculptor who is compelled by an evil fate to keep his pot boil- 
ing by putting clothes on a statue. Masculine or feminine, it 
matters not, for both are equally hideous when done in stone 
or brass. It is true that the most wonderful statue in the world 
— that of Diana the huntress — wears some clothes, but not 
much. I fear that if the Pioneer Mother were put on her pedes- 
tal in the scanty garb of Diana, some of our nasty nice ladies 
and gentlemen would be loudly and obstreperously shocked. 

At any rate, it appears that the order for the statue was sent 
East, to the grave scandal of the Home Industry League, and 
accordingly the man of artistic temperament proceeded in due 
course to evolve the ideal frontier lady out of his inner con- 
sciousness, even as the justly celebrated philosopher con- 
ceived of his camel 24 feet high. No, no : the frontier lady, as 
imagined in the East, was no such monster of gigantic stature, 
but she was quite as far away from the facts. Indeed, one 
learns that the Pioneer Mother was to be gibbeted in effigy as 
a sort of cross between an Indian squaw and Mrs. Skinclothes. 
It is objected by the indignant subscribers to the fund that the 
idealized lady is to be clothed in skins. Now it is objected by 
the severely practical people who find the money that the 
sculptor's ideal does not correspond with the facts, and accord- 
ingly there is loud crackling of thorns under the artist's pot. 
These excellent critics demand that the statue should tell the 
truth, and they resent the implication that the pioneers of Cali- 
fornia were Indians or half-breed trappers. In fact, the sculptor 
had put his subject in buckskins and moccasins. Now the sub- 
scribers insist that the statue should be shown in the garb and 
fashion of the early Victorian period — probably the most hide- 
ous and grotesque garniture that a perverse feminine ingenuity 
has ever devised. Imagine the Pioneer Mother rigged out in 
flounces, frills and furbelows, surmounting her peeping panta- 
lettes as she bends over the washtub. You can see the absurd 
fashions of the period preserved in Thackeray's drawings. 

?r s S 
Making a Cemetery. 

Of course I concede the right of woman to disfigure our 
public places. The men have been doing the same thing right 
along, and doing it worse. The streets and parks of San Fran- 
cisco are being converted to the uses of a cemetery and the 
death of every "prominent citizen" fills the judicious with a 
sense of alarm that soon we shall see his graven image in his 
habit as he lived taunting us, defying us from the street cor- 
ner in pot metal effigy. From the blundering piety of ancestor 
worship, good Lord deliver us. 

~8 S S 
Our Aspiring Volcano. 

We have with us "in our midst" an aspiring, rejuvenated vol- 
cano, whose efforts should be encouraged. Mt. Lassen needs 
friends, while it is trying to get a reputation, and in that regard 
I am pleased with the enterprise pf the Geological Survey, 
which has specially detailed an ingenious geomancer — name of 
Diller — to diagnose the internal distemper that troubles the 
bowels of the Sierra. Mr. Diller, in his capacity of dry nurse 
for a mountain, is pleased with Lassen's efforts, and the des- 
patches tell us : 



"All doubt that has heretofore existed about the action 
of Mt. Lassen being volcanic was set at rest to-day by the 
official announcement of J. S. Diller, government geologi- 
cal expert, who returned from a visit to the crater shortly 
before noon. Diller declares that there is not only from 
two to four inches of fresh sulphur coating the rocks and 
stones in the vicinity of the crater, but that there is also 
large quantities of fresh lava or molten rock. This plainly 
indicates that the action is not geyser in any manner, but 
that the mountain is actually engaged in a volcanic erup- 
tion that may develop into a second Vesuvius before it 
gets through." 

B 5 5 

Dry Nurse for a Mountain. 

Mr. Diller is a true friend of Lassen, and scouts the theory 
propounded by envy that it is nothing but a mud spring. He 
declares that the recent outbursts are "essentially volcanic," 
and have no political significance. He writes in picturesque 
vein for the Examiner : 

"It is up to Vulcan to prepare a nearby exhibit for the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, and he evidently sees his duty 
and is rejuvenating the energy of Lassen Peak as a kind 

of volcanic moving picture Time alone can tell 

what Lassen is going to do. The volcano may subside to 
its former quiescence. But we must not forget that it was 
only the top of the old Vesuvius that was blown off to 
make Mone Somma and the Vesuvius of to-day. Kraka- 
toa blew up from the very base with tremendous effect. 
There seems no good reason at present to fear a Krakatoan 
outbreak at Lassen peak, but the part of wisdom dictates 
a close watch." 

This is the real scientific dope, but why blame Vulcan? 
These are tremendous and appalling portents, as Dr. Diller 
darkly intimates, but after all, they may mean nothing in par- 
ticular. Not old Polonius himself had so many nods and winks 
and ifs and ans. It is diagnosis with a string to it. If you do 
not believe it, ask Vulcan. 

S S S 
An Unpatriotic Neighbor. 

Contrast the encouraging diagnosis of the official geomancer 
with the unpatriotic policy of the Chico Enterprise, which, in- 
stead of promoting home industry, is backbiting the volcano 
and casting unworthy slurs on its efforts to please. I quote 
from the Enterprise: 

"Maybe it was because he had just returned from "dry" — 
territory — for Tehama County is dry — or maybe it was 
because of the natural characteristics of Sacramentans to 
'see things' that others have never seen; whatever it was 
made George McPherson of the Capital City, who has just 
returned, he says, from Mount Lassen, one of the most 
lucid fiction story tellers of the age. Here is what Mc- 
Pherson says about Mount Lassen, he having arrived yes- 
terday in Sacramento in his automobile, having made the 
trip, so he says, to the crater and back: 

" 'That is the first volcano I ever saw, but no mere gey- 
ser would emit boulders, spit fire and send hot lava flow- 
ing down the mountain. That's what Mount Lassen is do- 
ing. The temperature to windward of the mountain is 
withering hot. The shrubbery has been scorched away 
for a long distance down the side of the mountain, and 
there's a dense smell of sulphur. Also, in the canyons 
which mark the slopes, redhot lava is flowing. At night 
the surroundings are illuminated for miles from the in- 
ternal fires. The eruptions have blown away the entire 
top of the mountain. When the volcano erupts the ground 
trembles as by an earthquake. All that section is of vol- 
canic origin. The old settlers believe other extinct vol- 
canoes will come to life again.' " 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



No Strings on His Diagnosis. 

Mr. McPherson does not mince words like our official geo- 
mancer. He puts no strings on his diagnosis, and Florence 
O'Brien should be in better business than casting doubt on the 
efforts of an ingenious and industrious booster. Boost, don't 
knock, Florence. Frank Jordan should be told about this. 

I hate to think that the policy of the Enterprise is inspired by 
a mean spirit of neighborhood jealousy, but it seems that Red 
Bluff has got ahead of Chico in the volcano products trade. It 
is related that the small boys of Red Bluff are doing a thriving 
business in selling pieces- of rock ballast filched from the 
Southern Pacific right of way to souvenir hunters on the trains. 
I learn from the Colusa Sun : 

"A drummer who makes this city on his regular trips, 
was here to-day and said that Friday while in Red Bluff he 
saw a little boy sell the last of a piece of his 'lava rock' to 
an elderly lady for a dime, and she was so anxious to have 
a souvenir for some friends in Los Angeles that she offered 
to give the boy a quarter if he could get her another one ? 
Did he get it? Well, leave it to him. The kid ran around 
the rear car to a small pile of rocks, and selecting a nice 
cobble, rushed back just as the train started to leave, and 
handed it to the delighted old lady, who smiled as she 
gave up the quarter." 

If the American souvenir hunter ever gets started on this 
lava business, he will pull up Lassen by the roots. 

Now Brother Mappes of the Fresno Mirror, being a long way 
removed from the zone of danger, treats Lassen with respect, 
and offers assurances of his most distinguished consideration 
like this: 

"Of course, Mt. Lassen is a volcano. California needs 
a volcano to complete its list of natural attractions, and we 
won't stand for any knocking. The man who questions 
Mt. Lassen's volcanic character should be required to try 
to put the lid on it." 

b" tf 5 

A Tale of Politics arid Journalism. 

Who owns the Sacramento Union ? I may not profess to 
know, but Sam Clover believes he can tell. At any rate he is 
responsible for an ingenious and interesting tale told in the 
Los Angeles Graphic which relates : 

"The Sacramento Union of Saturday announces that 
'Lynn C. Simpson, who for nearly a year has sat at the 
managing editor's desk of the Sacramento Union, has 
purchased a half interest in the paper.' I pass over the 
delicious inference that Mr. Simpson has wearied of merely 
'sitting at the desk,' and has decided to do something and 
proceed. It is known that the Sacramento Union has been 
'money-bound' for a distressing period. . . . Within the 
last two weeks Mr. Simpson ceased 'sitting at the manag- 
ing editor's desk' long enough to pay a visit to Los An- 
geles, and while relieving his legs from the cramp superin- 
duced by his long 'sit,' approached E. T. Earl with a subtle 
proposition, so I am informed. Be that as it may, Mr. 
Simpson was here, and shortly after his return to the capi- 
tal, his purchase of a half interest in the Union was an- 
nounced. This half could have been obtained only by pay- 
ing off $30,000 of the mortgage and calling the loan on the 
portion of the Union stock represented thereby. But Mr. 
Simpson, until he began 'sitting at the managing editor's 
desk' — oh, exquisite phrasing — was telegraph editor of the 
San Francisco Chronicle (confuse him not with Ernest 
Simpson, formerly of the Call), and around Jellison's and 
the other Press Club in San Francisco they were asking, 
'Gosh! where did Lynn get the money?' " 

"Mark, now, the chain of circumstance. In Sacramento 
there are three newspapers, the Bee, a strong administra- 
tion paper, owned by the McClatchys; the Star, a Scripps 
sheet, and therefore pro-Johnson; and the Union. For the 
last year the latter also has been cultivating the friendship 
of the over-lord. This meant that, without sending special 
correspondents to Sacramento, the newspapers of the State 
could get nothing out of the capital that did not redound to 
the credit of the administration. Johnson had the news 



channels controlled as effectively as if he had established 
an actual ownership. Then came the schism in the Pro- 
gressive ranks. Johnson, with a weather eye on a second 
term and the Presidential nomination, decided on behalf of 
the north that Brother Chet Rowell should be United States 
Senator, Meyer Lissner concurring on behalf of the South. 
Heney demurred on his own behalf in the North, encour- 
aged by E. T. Earl in the South. With this decided split 
in the party, each side began to watch the other, but the 
question with the Heney-Earl faction was how to watch 
the Governor without engaging special policemen. There 
is no police, however, so effective as the reportorial force 
of a daily newspaper. There is hardly ever a political 
revelation which does not have its source in a chance bit of 
information picked up by an alert newspaper man." 
It is well understood in political circles that Earl has broken 
with Johnson and Lissner. Indeed Lissner, who is running the 
California Outlook as the Organ of the Progressive party, 
makes no secret of his feeling toward Earl. 

I may add that Sam Clover's hilarious fling at Lynn Simp- 
son is scarcely justified. He has been making the Union a 
mighty good newspaper since he took to "sitting at the manag- 
ing editor's desk." 



THE NEW ADAMS BUILDING. 

New Home of E. F. Hutton & Co., at 61 Broadway, New York. 

(See picture of building on Page 2 of this issue.) 

The old-established New York stock exchange house of E. 
F. Hutton & Co., of New York, are now located in their new 
quarters in the new Adams Building at 61 Broadway. The 
firm has branches in San Francisco, San Jose, Los Angeles 
and Pasadena, with correspondents at Salt Lake, Butte, Colo- 
rado Springs, Denver, Chicago, Cincinnati and Columbus. The 
firm operate a duplex private wire from coast to coast, and 
connections which cover every important city in the United 
States and Canada, east, west, north and south, aggregating a 
total mileage of 30,000 miles. On or about August 1st, E. F. 
Hutton & Co. will move their present Hotel St. Francis branch 
office from the mezzanine floor to the ground floor of the new 
wing, corner Post and Powell streets 

E. F. Hutton & Co. are the pioneer New York Stock Ex- 
change house on the Pacific Coast. R. E. Mulcahy, the Western 
partner, is the best known broker in the world. It is said "Mul" 
is known in every market center of the world. During his 
career in the brokerage business he has met about all of the 
big people of affairs throughout the world, and counts them 
among his closest friends. 



Mrs. Cronan heard her little granddaughter Margaret 

crying as if in great pain, and hastened to the child. "Why, 
dear, what is the matter?" inquired Mrs. Cronan. "Did you 
meet with an accident?" "N-no, grandma!" sobbed Margaret. 



"It w-wasn't an accident! 
Harper's Magazine. 



M-mother did it on p-purpose! 




MACKIE & CO. 
1SL.AY. SCOTLAND 



Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke &, Co. 

I.i.t. p.ain* Cun 314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. T. 



and California Advertiser 



July 11, 1914. 




Please remark the tenacity with which the old-fashioned 

pollies cling to their moth-eaten superstitions concerning the 
moral effect of owning the "organization." In days of old, be- 
fore the direct primaries and non-partisan ballots were the rule, 
the State and county committees virtually controlled the par- 
ties. Nowadays, nobody cares a whoop what these committees 
may do or whom they endorse. In fact the Republican State 
Committee has not money enough to pay the rent of head- 
quarters, but the old pollies are still faithfully waiting for 
"orders." As a matter of fact, under the new system every 
candidate is ompelled to create his own organization to cover 
the State. It is a costly and wasteful business. The law 
makes it practically impossible for a poor man to aspire for a 
political office in which he is, in order to get before the people 
and fight out the game, compelled to make two campaigns, 
covering the district or the State in which he lives. 

Musical America publishes an article which shows that 

the number of cities in the United States which have espoused 
the cause of municipal music has increased remarkably within 
the past few years. California, according to this article, ex- 
hibits firm belief in municipal music. Oakland high schools 
are offering courses in harmony and composition, the work be- 
ing credited on the same basis with that of other studies. The 
plan to appropriate $10,000 for public school music was, how- 
ever, met with a storm of protest, based on the grounds that it 
is unnecessary to provide musical instruments for school child- 
ren. San Francisco has the People's orchestra, which, under 
the guidance of the Philharmonic section of the Recreation 
League, is endeavoring to familiarize the people of San Fran- 
cisco with the world's best music at a price within the reach 
of all. 

Professor Frank Boas, of the Department of Anthropol- 
ogy of Columbia University, who is lecturing at the University 
of California summer school, is a person of advanced ideas, and 
is convinced that all races are equal. "So I find myself," he 
says, "not particularly in sympathy without your Western feel- 
ing against the intermarriage of Americans with Japanese or 
Hindus or other Oriental races. It is sheer sentimentality and 
without any basis in biology. In Mexico many of the better 
families are the fruit of intermarriage between old Spanish 
stock and Indians. In Europe practically all of the population 
is the product of the most divergent racial intermixture. Europe 
is far more truly a 'melting pot of the nations' than is the 
United States." Would you like your daughter to marry a 
nigger? 

Joe Lanktree, who does business in Oakland and lives 

in Alameda, has a delinquent clock of mysterious habit and 
balky propensities. No matter how often you wind it, the ma- 
chine stops at 11 o'clock. Experts have examined the time- 
piece and protested that its works are all right. "I bought it 
at a second hand store a long time ago," explained Lanktree. 
"I believe that it once belonged to an Elk lodgeroom and got 
its odd habit there. Anyway, some of the antlered herd have, 
threatened to take possession of it, so I intend to keep a close 
watch. The clock is all right with the exception of its propen- 
sity of becoming silent at the hour of eleven." Do the Elks 
stop at 11 o'clock?. 



The senseless agitation that seeks to enact prohibition 

in California, does not find much favor in Massachusetts, and 
the Springfield Republican thus puts the case: "Vine growers 
in California are making ready to present their side of the case 
in the sharp controversy over a prohibition amendment to the 
State Constitution, which is to come in the fall, and in which 
about one thousand ministers will take the prohibition side. 
The people who raise grapes urge that for half a century the 
State has encouraged this industry, and that great numbers of 
persons have had their whole fortune invested in it. The pro- 
posed amendment, they say, would be destructive, because the 
sale of table grapes would not be profitable if the manufacture 
of wine were forbidden. The vineyards of the State, they 
show, are more important than the orchards, and occupy 346,873 
acres, of which half is devoted to wine grapes. These have an 
acreage twice that of prunes, five times the walnuts, nine times 
the lemons, eleven times the almonds. The receipts from the 
export of wine are from $10,000,000 to $15,000,000 annually. 
All this would be destroyed — would there be any moral benefit 
for compensation? It is quite possible that the annihilation of 
California's wine would have just the contrary effect, by in- 
creasing the consumption of stronger drinks." 

Mrs. Allie B. Simmons, of Riverside, has changed her 

mind, alas! She will be married and so will leave a weighty 
political problem up in the air. Mrs. Simmons announced her 
intention of running for office at the primaries. Subsequently 
it became known that she had set her wedding day for a date 
between the primaries and the general election. Frank Jor- 
dan, secretary of State, was appealed to to settle the momen- 
tous question as to whether, having been nominated as "Mrs. 
Simmons," she should go on the ballot under that name, or as 
Mrs. Wheeler. Jordan decided in favor of retaining the lady's 
ante-nuptial name for political purposes. Others contended that 
the name must be changed to keep up with the domestic facts. 
But now the problem is shelved, for Mrs. Simmons-Wheeler 
has put away her personal ambition and will take the stump 
for her new husband, who is the Prohibition candidate for 
United States Senator. It seems a sad waste to lose one of our 
problems. 

It was proposed by R. R. Wilson, of West Sacramento. 

at a recent meeting of the art club, to establish a real estate 
commission which will bear the same relation to lands in Cali- 
fornia as the railway commission does to the public utilities 
of the State. The purpose is to eliminate dishonesty from the 
brokerage field and promote honesty in advertising California 
lands here and abroad. Another commission to keep people 
honest. Shortly we shall have special commissions at good 
salaries to attend to the business morals of the butcher, the 
baker and the candlestick maker. 

Oakland is face to face with a queer problem of applied 

science. It is proposed to move the Chab'ot observatory from 
its present location in the heart of town if a place can be found 
where the electric lights do not put out the stars. It's partly the 
fault of these new Tungsten lights, according to Charles Burck- 
halter, director of the observatory, and the electric signs and 
powerful nitro arc lamps also have their effect on the heavens. 
Planets are fogged when an attempt is made to get a specto- 
graph of a star. The telescope is clouded by light. 

The latest and perhaps queerest ukase promulgated by 

the faculty of the University of California is that the summer 
school girls must not appear on the campus in their gymna- 
sium suits. They must conceal their shapely 1 — mbs in an en- 
vious skirt. Is the sense of humor extinct among university 
dons? 



July 11. 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




D'S WAND 



;*rT 



'We obey no wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

PAUL GERSON. 




"Trifling With To-morrow" at the Columbia. 

It was quite an exciting night at the Columbia on 
Monday evening. The occasion was the premiere of a 
new play by a San Francisco young man, who has al- 
ready one 'success to his credit. Frank Mandel, the 
gentleman in question, is yet very young, and I "under- 
stand that this is his first attempt at doing something 
serious. In this, his new play, he has chosen for 
his three acts a hospital environment, and with one 
exception all his characters are actively connected 
with hospitable life. The head nurse is the leading 
character. She has a husband, who deserted her years 
ago, who is a dope fiend of the worst kind. She is in 
love with a doctor of the visiting staff, a widower with 
a young daughter, the latter a girl in her teens, who is 
learning to become a trained nurse. The degenerate 
husband visits his wife at the hospital, where the head 
nurse has passed as a single woman. She gives him 
lodging there for the night. His presence is discov- 
ered the next morning. Radiating from this there is 
a sub-plot of love interest, and from the before-men- 
tioned incidents, the dramatic situations are evolved 
and brought to a climax. Whatever fault the play 
may possess, it cannot be denied that it lacks interest 
and sustained effect. Within a few minutes after the 
rise of the first curtain, the story manages to hold the audience, 
and this grip is not relaxed until the fall of the final curtain. 
Mandel has without doubt resorted to methods which at times 
almost border on the melo-dramatic, and this is specially true of 
the end of his second act, which while strikingly dramatic and 
convincing is theatric to a degree. At first blush we are apt to 
overlook these things, but on Broadway the reviewers are not 
so charitable. The play as it stands is a splendid vehicle, and 
requires some alterations, aside from the dramatic ejaculations 
and outbursts which occur here and there and which sometimes 
leap the bounds of credulity and reason. Then again Mandel 




Scene from "Cabiria" at the Gaiety Theatre. 

does not stick to the real facts concerning hospital life. Head 
nurses are never put on cases, nor can anybody go on a case 
until they are full fledged graduates. Yet here he has both the 
head nurse and a four months' beginner assigned to a case 
simply because the exigency of the play demands this. I am 
sure it can be accomplished in a more rational manner. These 
are technical details which can easily be righted. Without 
doubt the play will arouse interest in the East. It is bound to 
command attention. The necessary ingredients are all there, 



^ V J 




Lianc Carrera, Anna Hcld's daughter, and her chorus or American beauties at the Orpheum next week. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 




King Syphax "Cabiria" at the Gaiety. 

and with judicious changes, and there is room for a number of 
them, I am inclined to believe that the play will be numbered 
among the season's successes. . Mandel gives utterance to a 
number of clever epigrams, many of which we could not catch 
the opening night on account of some of the characters pro- 
bably being too self-conscious and nervous. What he has shown 
us promises much for his future, and being a man very young 
in years,- there is no reason why he should not take his place 
among the noted dramatists of the day. Much praise is due 
the splendid cast for very effective work, and I single out Miss 
Hanson for special honors, her role being a singularly trying 
one. This capable actress kept her characterization well with- 
in the realm of reason and naturalness and proved a revelation 
in many ways. Her entire performance stamped her an artist 
of no mean calibre. Miss Hanson never resorts to artifice. 
For this reason her work is crammed with genuine merit. She 
is a girl with a big future. Charles Cherry also deserves 
special mention for a great performance of the dope fiend, 
which shows this fine actor to be a man of real versatility. 
It was splendid acting. Charles Richman has a role which 
does not exact much from him, but what he had to do he did 
excellently well. Carroll McComas and Frank Kingdon and 
George Christie and Robert Newcomb each individually con- 
tributed some fine acting to their respective roles. The two 
scenes were staged very complete. It is a noteworthy per- 
formance and reflects credit on all concerned. 
* * * 

Good Vaudeville at the Orpheum 

William A. Brady makes a big hit with his vaudeville of- 
fering entitled "Beauty is only Skin Deep," which is the lead- 
ing feature of the Orpheum bill this week. This well con- 
structed piece is a notable example of good dramatic archi- 
tecture and planning on which the author, Elizabeth Jordan, 
deserves the fullest congratulation. She caught hold of a good 
idea when she laid the scene of her little play in a beauty 
parlor, where' indeed almost anything in the line. of comedy 
might happen. The general scheme of the playlet is like this : 
Mrs. Joel Dixon, wife of a Western Senator, feels that she is 
losing her husband's love. He was poor when they were mar- 



ried and she helped him amass a fortune. She, however, is 
old-fashioned and uncultured, and the husband figures that his 
wife's presence in Washington might prove an obstacle to his 
"career." Meantime, he has formed an attachment for Mrs. 
Herbert Gorden — pretty and unprincipled. 

Mrs. Dixon loves her husband and decides not to give him 
up without a struggle; so she visits a New York beauty parlor, 
intent on having a new face and figure. In the beauty shop she 
meets Dixon's inamorata. Here, of course, we are face to face 
•Aith the eternal dramatic triangle with two women contending 
for one man, and this brings us up to the climax cleverly 
worked out by the author. Jean Adair plays Mrs. Dixon, and 
achieves a notable success. Altogether the thing is very well 
done, and the support is excellent. 

Kramer and Morton, black face comedians, call 'themselves 
'Two Black Dots," and prove themselves accomplished song 
end dance artists. 

Charles Yule, Fred Munier and their company, won many a 
laugh in a rural skit called "The Stranger." Herbert Bash- 
Jord, a local journalist, wrote the sketch, which abounds in 
bright lines and comedy situations. 

Yvette, who is described as "the whirlwind violinist," hon- 
estly earns that name by her breezy instrumentation. She puts 
it over the footlights. 

Holding over are Everett Shinn's tickling travesty, "Wronged 
from the Start;" the Gardiner dancing trio, Henry Lewis, the 
German comedian, and the Doris Wilson Company in "Through 
the Looking Glass." 

Gaiety. 

Every extravagant promise made by the management of the 
photo-spectacle, "Cabiria," has been kept, and the most san- 
guine expectation, raised by reports on the production from 
Rome, Milan, London, New York and Chicago has been real- 
ized. "Nothing like it was ever seen in the world." Such was 
the comment of the invited audience at Friday morning's mati- 
nee, and as the pictures and episodes of the great D'Annunzio's 
vision passed before the riveted vision of the great audience, 
signs of approbation and wonder were heard, while the music 
by the great orchestra and the choral offerings from the hidden 
singers back on the stage completed an impression of co-ordi- 
nated beauty which will never be effaced from the memory. 

"Cabiria" is the triumph of the art of motion picture making, 
and resembles the usual or even the extraordinary "movie" 
about as much as a small cast in light opera reasembles a 
Metropolitan grand opera production with Caruso and Tetraz- 
zini as stars. More than five thousand people are assembled 
in some of the scenes of "Cabiria." 

* >:: * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Orpheum. — One of the most important announcements in the 
field of vaudeville is the initial appearance in this city at the 
Orpheum next Sunday matinee of Liane Carrera, the daughter 
of Anna Held. Miss Carrera will offer a musical melange, and 
will be assisted by six stunning show girls. 

M. and Mme. Corradini's Managery is composed of a group 
of trained animals, consisting of a pair of zebras, a two-ton 
elephant, a horse and several dogs. 

"A Ragtime Soldier" is the title of a drill skit of music and 
novelties offered by John and Mae Burke. 

Sammy Burns ana Alice Fulton will present a series of 
terpsichorean classics. 

Britt Wood, who, on account of his characterization, has 
been frequently referred to as "The Boob," is one of the most 
original jesters of the period. 

Next week will be the last of Yvette, Kramer and Morton, 
and Wm. A. Brady's "Beauty is Only Skin Deep." 

* * * 

Columbia Theatre. 

The original plans of the Columbia Theatre management to 
produce a new play every week during the current engagement 
of the All-Star Players will be disturbed in the instance of 
"Trifling with To-morrow," which has scored such an unusual 
success that it will be retained for a second week, beginning 
Monday, July 13th. "Trifling with To-morrow" is an entirely 
new work by Frank Mandel, a San Francisco playwright, and 
received its premiere presentation at the Columbia Theatre 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



on Monday night. It proved an instant success. The mem- 
bers of the All-Star company are given an unusual opportunity 
to show their particular ability in the several important roles 
of the Mandel play, and surely Gladys Hanson, Charles Rich- 
man, Charles Cherry, Carroll McComas, Frank Kingdon and 
the others have not appeared to better advantage. Matinees 
are given on Wednesday and Saturday. The afternoon per- 
formances, likewise Sunday nights, are played at "pop" prices. 
"Fine Feathers" is underlined to follow. 



FOREST NOTES. 

Bids were opened in the office of the District Forest at San 
Francisco last week for the sale of approximately 14,000,000 
feet of timber, chiefly sugar pine, on the Plumas National 
Forest near Sterling City, California. The sale was awarded to 
the Diamond Match Company of Chico. Logging will com- 
mence immediately, and will be conducted in connection with 
the cutting of adjacent timber owned by the company. The 
contract runs until November 30, 1915. 

The annual capacity of the forest nurseries of the govern- 
ment is about 25 million young trees. 

Cornell University recently dedicated a forestry building in 
connection with the State College of Agriculture. 

It is said that the best times of day to see forest fires from 
lookout stations are just after daylight and just before sunset. 

The forest service has been requested to co-operate with 
the port authorities of Coos Bay, Washington, in planting to 
control shifting sand dunes. 

Jack pine trees planted ten years ago in the sand hills of 
Nebraska are now large enough to produce fence posts. Last 
year the first seed was gathered from this plantation. 

The agricultural experiment station at Pullman, Washington, 
is establishing an arboretum in which it is proposed to grow a 
group of each of the important timber trees of the temperate 
zone. 

"Be sure your match is out. Break it in two before you 
throw it away." The forest service has thus amended rule one 
of the familiar "Six Rules for the Prevention of Fire in the 
Mountains," believing that in this form it will remind inexperi- 
enced campers to pinch out the glowing stems of their matches 
as mountaineers instinctively do. Cards, vest pocket size, 
bearing the six rules on one side and the State game laws on 
the other, are now being distributed by forest officers. 

The New York State forest nurseries have a capacity of 
28 million young trees a year. 

The State of Pennsylvania celebrates two arbor days each 
year — one for spring planting and one for the fall, in April 
and October respectively. 

On the Deerlodge National Forest in Montana one lookout 
station has the record of reporting accurately by distance and 
direction a fire that was sixty miles away. 

Nearly three million young trees are being set out this spring 
on the national forests of Northern Idaho and Montana. On the 
St. Joe National Forest in Idaho three thousand acres will be 
planted. 



Professor Sudbury, who was extremely near-sighted. 

went to the barber's, sat down in the barber's chair, took off 
his glasses, and allowed himself to be shaved. When the artist 
was done with him he did not move, and for a while nobody dis- 
turbed him. But other customers began to arrive, and the chair 
was needed. The head barber, suspecting that his learned 
patron had fallen asleep, asked his boy to wake him. The pro- 
fessor overheard the order. "No, my good man," he said, "I 
am not asleep. The fact is, I am frightfully near-sighted. 
When I took my glasses off just now I was no longer able to 
see myself in the mirror opposite. Naturally I supposed I had 
already gone home." — New York Evening Post. 



On Wednesday evenings for the last few weeks, the 

management of Techau Tavern has presented three costly gifts 
to three fortunate ladies, who were among those present at the 
informal dansants, which have been held on these evenings. 
The occasion this week was particularly successful, and ex- 
cept on such occasions as New Year's and Christmas eves, the 
Tavern has never been more crowded. All the Wednesday 
evening dances in this series have been purely informal affairs, 
and their success is such that they will, undoubtedly, be con- 
tinued for many weeks to come. 



A consular report notes that recent experiments have 

been carried out in Croydon (near London, England), in the 
effect of radium on plant growth. It is stated that many of the 
results are so promising that it is quite possible that the use 
of radium for crops may become one of its most important 
applications in the future. It is claimed that radium has an 
adverse effect on the "unwanted" soil organisms, leaving the 
useful ones freer to stimulate growth. 



The East Bay cities are in perpetual squabble over the 

disposition of garbage. Oakland dumps its stuff so that it 
washes up on the San Francisco beach, and Albany is quarrel- 
ing with Berkeley because of the searching and assorted smells 
that blow from the municipal incinerator. Mayor Heywood of 
Berkeley tells the Albany high nosers that none of his neigh- 
bors are bothered by the municipal distribution of perfume, and 
he adds the dubious explanation that "maybe it's pride in the 
incinerator as a city institution that keeps them in this non- 
complaining mood." 

8 S** 

g If You Are Looking For Trouble | 





DON'T COME TO SANTA CRUZ 



Nothing But Good Times There 



I 

Gaiety Theatre 



Rates reduced in Casa del Rey, 
Cottage City and Grill 



O'Farrell. Opposite Orpheum 
Phone Sutter 1111 
NOW RUNNING — D'ANNUNZIO'S STUPENDOUS PHOTO-DRAMA 

"CAB I R I A" 
A 250.000 Production 
Augmented Orchestra — Chorus of 30. 
PRICES — Evening, 25c, "'"c, 76c, $1. 
Matinees. 25 ami 50 cents. 
Evenings at 8:15; Afts. 2:15. 
PATRONS URGED TO BE SEATED AT RISE OF CURTAIN. 

O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 
~Bc K innlng THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON MATINEE EVERY DAY 

THE ACME OF VAUDEVILLE 

MASK CARRERA, ANNA IIKLh's DAUGHTEK assisted by Tyler Brooke 

in oi American Beauties in n singing and dancing Creation liy 

Irving Berlin; M. A MME. i.'OKRAUINUS MENAGERY introducing trained 

Zebras Elephants, Hnrses anil Dogs: .lOHN A MAE BURKE. "A Ragtime 

Soldier"; BURNS a FULTON, Daintj Dancing Satellites: BRJTT WOOD, 
rhi luvenile rester; YVETTE, The Whirlwind Violinist: KRAMER & 
MORTON; Last Week— William A Brady's Production of "beauty is 
ONLY SKIN DEEP" by Elizabeth Jordan. 

Bvenine; prices. 10c. 25c, 50c. 75c. Box seats, ?1. Matinee prices 
l except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 60c 



Orpheum 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Mason and Geary Street 
Phone Franklin 150 

The Leading Playhouse 

NEW YORK MUST WAIT 
WE KEEP IT FOR ANOTHER WEEK. BEGINNING MONDAY. .Ill I in 
Frank Handel's Unusual and Original Play 

"TRIFLING WITH TO-MORROW 
i to Perfection by the 

ALL STA R PLAYERS 
"POP" PRICES WED. MAT. SAT, MAT. AND SUNDAY NIGHTS Jrtofl.00 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



PILLSBURY'S PICTURES, me 
VIEWS OF CALIFORNIA 

KODAK finishing done by FXPERT5. We will send 
for your films. 
219 POWELL STREET Phone Kearny 3841 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 







The announcement of the engagement of Mrs. Norma Pres- 
ton Ames and Harry Scott confirms a long suspected affair, 
the first hint of which was given in these columns. At that 
time the principals in the romance denied the possibility of 
their friendship culminating in marriage, and their pretended 
indignation fooled some of their friends, but not the society 
editor of this paper. Any one who would keep a finger on the 
pulse of such romances must not do it with a trembling hand, 
but with the steady touch of the expert, and usually it is not 
diEficult to tell whether the heart beats are the mere fluctuations 
of a flirtation or the tempo that means tying up for more than 
a season. From the first, the trained observer could see that 
this was not a summer affair, but an all the year round propo- 
sition. 

The gossips insist that the Scott family was a little disturbed 
about the marriage of their son to a divorcee with two children, 
but if they had any objections in the beginnings of the romance 
they have very cleverly amputated those qualms, and there 
is not the sign of a scar to mark the spot. In fact, the Scotts 
seem more than delighted with the idea, and are sunning the 
path of the bride-to-be with their felicitations upon their own 
good fortune in enrolling her as a member of the family. Which 
is certainly very kindly conduct on the part of "in-laws" and 
the kind to knock the underpinning out of the foundation of 
gossip to the contrary. The wedding will be an affair of the 
immediate future, and will be attended by the members of 
the immediate families. The Preston fortune was not divided 
among the children, but was left to the mother, who controls 
it, so Mrs. Ames does not bring a fortune to supplement the 
Scott wealth. 

The denials that flouted the rumors of this engagement re- 
mind one of the romance of Mrs. Ames' brother, Frank Preston, 
who married Mrs. Frank Norris. the dashing widow of the fam- 
ous novelist, so rich in premise and so early lost to the liter- 
ature of the country. His widow was constantly divided be- 
tween her devotion to that memory of genius and her vivid, 
eager desire to go on another adventure in matrimony. She 
had many suitors, who at one time or another gave promise 
of winning out, but always she returned to the memory of Nor- 
ris. When Preston routed all others from the list, he looked 
like a winning candidate, but the attractive young widow went 
right on repeating her daily litany, "I would rather be the 
widow of Frank Norris than the wife of any living man." 
Which shows what Preston had to overcome before he could 
gain her consent to marry him. 

© © ffi 

The divorce of the Ebrights came as a distinct surprise to all 
but the intimate friends of the family, for although there have 
been family difficulties for some time, they have been kept 
so securely under lock and key that only the burglars in so- 
ciety have been able to jimmy their way in, and extract the 
secret from safe keeping. The fact that Gertrude Hopkins, 
the young daughter of Mrs. Ebright, is to be one of the debu- 
tantes of next season has caused many to wonder that her 
mother should take this action now, but I have it from an inti- 
mate friend of that family that it was decided in family coun- 
cil, which included the astute E. W. Hopkins, that it was con- 
sidered better to sue for divorce now. " A divorce will really 
put less of a blight on Miss Gertrude's first season than the 
uncertainty of tangled domestic affairs, the twisted skeins of 
which the public was sure to get hold of sooner or later, and 
tie into more of a mess than a divorce case. The marriage of 
the beautiful widow of Sherwood Hopkins and Doctor Ebright 
was considered an ideal match, and was sanctioned by all the 
family of the late Sherwood Hopkins, who found no complaint 
with his lovely young widow for not wearing weeds the rest of 
her life. The daughter was sent to Santa Barbara to school, 
but has spent her vacations here with her mother and other 
relatives, and as she was very fond of her prospective step- 
father at the time of the marriage, and has been very inscrut- 



able ever since, her young friends were very unprepared for 
the announcement that a divorce was on the calendar. 

Miss Hopkins will be one of the very widely feted buds of 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

DURING 

Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 

CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



Plan to Spend Your Vacation in 

YOS E M ITE VALLEY 



THIS YEAR 



It costs no more than many a common- 
place resort. In Yosemite there is nothing 
common. There is plenty to do and see, and 
rest and recreation not found elsewhere. 

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE IN THE PARK 

Auto stages will carry the visitor between 
railroad terminus and Yosemite this season, 
one of the finest auto trips in the world, 
without extra cost. 
ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER 

There are hotels, boarding camps, private 
camping — your choice at reasonable rates. 

For further information and rates, see any 
ticket agent, or address, 



YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 




HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Very Attractive Summer Rates 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Popular Prices 

Under Management of Victor Reiter 



ALP 



TAM - i 

CALIFORNIA vs. SWITZERLAND 

WE HAVE THE ALPb RIGHT HERE 

Mt. Tamalpais and Mulr Woods 



The Recreation 

and Play Grounds 

of San Francisco 



FARE 
EITHER TRIP 

$1.90 



Via Sausalito Ferry 

Foot of 

Market Street 



$7 ROUND TRIP TO 

Anderson Springs 

By Writing to 
ROSE E. ANDERSON 



Anderson's Springs 



Lake County, Cal 



Rendezvous of Automobilists 
HOTEL OCCIDENTAL 

SANTA ROSA 

Rates, European Plan, $1.00 per day and up. 

Garage in Connection 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



L3 



the coming season, for her family affiliations are not only im- 
portant, but among the kind of people who like to do that sort 
of thing, and do it well. Her cousins, Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mrs. 
Will Taylor, Mrs. Fred McNear, Mrs. Cheever Cowdin and the 
rest of the family, will assure her the sort of time that only a 
girl with so many interested sponsors can hope to write to the 
glowing accounts of her first season. 
8 * 8 

There is a new baby in the home of the Schillings, and the 
proud mother, Alexandra Hamilton Schilling, is only a degree 
less important in her new role than the proud father. Here is 
a story that is going the rounds of the friends of the Schilling 
families, which shows that family tradition may take strange 
twists, but does not die. The other day the nurse found one 
of the kiddies out in the yard with a hatchet. There was the 
convenient cherry tree, but the child's name is not George. 
The horrified nurse grabbed the hatchet before the youngster 
had time to damage himself or the scenery, and when his father 
parted his howls of protest in the middle with a request to 
know what sinister purpose he had with the hatchet, the kiddie 
blubbered, "I was going to chop down a spite fence." The 
other day Miss Miriam Michelson won a suit in the local 
Superior Court against a member of the Schilling family who 
had for years fenced off her sunlight with a forty foot fence 
that added to the privacy of the Schilling garden. Evidently 
the child had heard some discussion of this fence, but it is in- 
teresting to know that in his play game he was bent upon 
chopping it down instead of rebuilding it. 
© © © 

Much of the entertaining down the peninsula way is of 
the most informal fashion, for there is a sort of spirit of re- 
laxaton in the air, and every one is saving up energy — and 
possibly funds — for Exposition year, when the hospitality of 
San Francisco will be on display, and much of the prestige we 
gain must be in the hands of the chatelaines of the magnificent 
country homes. Many of these homes are either being rebuilt 
or are in course of construction, which mitigates against enter- 
taining on a formal scale. The clubhouse at Burlingame is the 
rendezvous of the outdoor enthusiasts, who foregather there 
for the long, cool drinks and the other things that are dis- 
pensed there, and all day long one finds the tables filled with 
gay groups of people auditing up the accounts of the golf links, 
tennis courts, bridge or polo, and much merry banter echoes 
in the cool of the deep verandas. The interest in tennis, by the 
way, is entirely a tribute to Malcolm Whitman, who is a world 
champion, and while there is no one out here in his set who is 
his peer at the game, he is very good natured about playing. 
Many of the women, particularly his wife, are putting up very 
good games under his inspiring advice. 

Farther down, at Los Gatos, there have been a number of 
more formal dinner parties and dances, Dr. Harry Tevis enter- 
taining in his usual magnificent but charming manner for his 
house guests, Mrs. J. N. Amsden and Mr. and Mrs. William 
Haupt. These guests are being shown all the wonders of our 
country life, and in addition make occasional trips to town, as 
the other night, when they motored up for a box party at the 
Columbia, which Dr. Tevis arranged in their honor, and which 
gave a very festive note to the performance, the handsome wo- 
men in the party in their evening clothes giving an air to the 
audience that one does not usually find there during the sum- 
mer months. 

The Phelan place, not very far from that of the Tevis home, 
has likewise been the scene of some very delightful enter- 
taining. The Downey Harveys are Mr. Phelan's house guests 
for the summer, and Mrs. Harvey, in the role of hostess in the 
home of Mr. Phelan, has added that touch which Mrs. Harvey, 
with her wonderful personality, always gives to everything that 
she graces. The host himself has the Senatorial bee buzzing 
so loudly in his summer bonnet that he is but an infrequent 
week-ender in his own home, so the entertaining that is done 
there is all crowded into those intervals. 



The "Emporium" handles "Old Forester" whisky. Sold 

in glass only. Direct from distillery to you. 



Before lO A. M. Res. Phone Prospect 1973 

After lO A. M Studio " 2177 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

FOR THE STUDY OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN DANCES 

Private Lessons Given 1443 POLK STREET 

By Appointment Only Studio 11 

Sketches For Vaudeville Furnished 



Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 
Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



yJ Quiet Hotel of Unusual Excellence 

Bellevue Hotel 

Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters (^specially to Luncheons ana Banquets 

H. W. WILLS. Manager 



THE GABLES HOTFL 

Open as Usual 

Rates $9.00 up. Near Boyes Springs, 
Verano Station, N. W. P. R. R. Address 

H. P. MATHEWSON 

SONOMA CITY, CALIFORNIA 



NOW READY 
"VACATION 1914" 



The Guide to 



Summer Outing Places 



Tributary to the 



Northwestern Pecific Railroad 

Make your vacation plans beforehand by consulting 
its pages. Profuse illustration and reliable descriptive 
text afford an instructive and reliable guide to this in- 
viting VACATIONLAND, lying in Marin, Sonoma, Men- 
docino, Lake and Humboldt counties. It contains a 
complete list of Hotels, Town and Rural Homes and 
Camp Resorts. 

Copies of "VACATION" may be had free at 874 
Market Street (Flood Building), Sausalito Ferry Ticket 
Office, or on application to 

J. J. GEARY, G. P. & F. A. 

808 PHELAN BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



AT THE HOME. CLUB, CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

ALWAYS SATISFACTORY 

Geo. W. Caswell Co. 

530-534 Folsom St. San Francisco 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 




SOCHL^PERSOBSL ITEMS 




ENGAGEMENTS. 
COOK-KELLY. — An interesting nngagenient just announced is that of 
Miss Ella Cook to James Raleigh Kelly. Miss Cook is the younger 
daughter of Mrs. Mary E. Cook. 1540 McAllister street. Mr. Kelly is 
the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred R. Kelly. 2195 Devisadero street. 
The wedding will be quietly celebrated in September. 
PISCHEL-FLETCHF.F:. — Dr. and Mrs. Kaspar Pisch'el announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter. Inez, to Mr. Harold Augustus Fletcher, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Fletcher, of Reno. Nev. 
WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
BROMWELL-MARTIN. — Miss Barbara Bromwell has named September 
2d as the day upon which she will become the wife of John Martin, Jr., 
of Ross Valley. As yet no definite plans have been set for the wed- 
ding, but it will be a brilliant function, drawing the smart set from 
all around the bay. 
HOLT-BORTON. — July 31st is the date announced for the wedding of Miss 
Ruth Holt and Earl Borton. which will take place at the home of the 
bride in Morton street. Oakland. The officiating clergyman will be 
the Reverend N. A. Baker of the First Unitarian Church of Ala- 
meda. The maid of honor will be Miss Hazel Holt, sister of the 
bride, and the other attendants will be Miss Ethel Plummer and Mrs. 
Florence Plummer Mcllroy; little Marian Fish as flower girl; Albert 
Lacombe, best man; and Lionel Lacombe and Harold Keys, ushers. 
The young couple will make their home in Oakland after a brief wed- 
ding journey. • 
ORR-JORGENSEX. — On July 22d. Miss Florence Orr, daughter of Mrs. 
James W. Orr. will become Mrs. Virgil Jorgensen at an elaborate 
event at the First Unitarian Church at S:30 o'clock. Reverend Caleb 
S. Dutton officiating. Miss Orr will be attended by Miss Amy Jor- 
gensen. the sister of the groom, as her maid of honor, and her 
bridesmaids will be Misses Roberta Haslelt. Helen Gober. Esperance 
Ghirardelli and Helen Soule. After the ceremony there will be a 
small wedding reception and supper at the home of the bride's mother 
in Gough street. 
WHEELER-HEAD. — Miss Elizabeth Wheeler has chosen July 28th as 
the date of her wedding to Bradwuy Head. So far, however, no 
definite plans have been made beyond the fact that it will be a church 
wedding, with a small reception at the home of the Charles Stetson 
Wheelers afterward. 

WEDDINGS. 
BURRITT-SXELL.— Miss Elizabeth Burritt and Mr. Joel A. Snell were 
married Monday. Miss Burritt is the daughter of Judge Charles H. 
Burritt, one of the Federal Judges in the Philippines. She is a Stan- 
ford graduate. Mr. Snell is the son of the late John A. Snell, a pio- 
neer banker and mining man of California, and for a time head of 
the Department of Education in the Philippines. He is now engaged 
in educational and literary work in this State. 
URIES-L1LIEXTHAL.— Miss Dorothy Katherine Fries became the wife 
of Jesse Warren Lilienthal. Jr., in the rose room of the Fairmont 
Hotel on Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock. After the ceremony there 
was a wedding dinner, after which Mr. and Mrs. Lilienthal left 
for a motor trip of a week or two. In September they will go 
abroad for an extended tour. The bride is the only daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Fries, her father being president of the 
California Fruit Canners' Association, and a director in several of 
the large financial houses of the city. The bridegroom, who is con- 
nected with the Anglo and London Paris National Bank, is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Warren Lilienthal, his father being one of the 
best known attorneys in the West, President of the L'nited Railroads 
and an officer in several banks and large corporations of the State. 
IIAXAGAN-HOF.MEISTER.-At a pretty wedding at St. Peter's Church. 
Saturday evening. June 27th. Miss Margaret Hanagan became the 
wife of Augustus Simon Hofmeistef of Oakland. The ceremony took 
place at 7 o'clock, and was performed by Father Doyle. After the 
ceremony a wedding supper was served at the home of the bride's 
aunt. Mrs. M. Devlin. 1547 Treat avenue, at which the bridal party and 
a few friends were present. The young couple departed later for a 
honeymoon in the northern part of the State. Upon their return 
they will live in Oakland. The bride is a well known San Francisco 
girl, who was educated in this city, and has made her home for sev- 
eral years with her aunt, Mrs. Devlin. The groom is the son of 
George Hofmeister. former Assessor of El Dorado County. 
REXN-LOXG. — Luaren C. Long, son of a prominent physician of Fresno, 
was married to Miss Adele Renn, a local society belle. Mr. Long is 
manager of the Brown newsstand in the lobby of the Flood Building. 
They will tour the southern part of the State in an automobile. His 
father. Dr. Long, was for years physician in the army at Fort Mc- 
Dowell. On their return they will make their home at 1329 Gough 
street, which has been cozily fitted up by the groom. 
TEAS. 
ASHTOX. — Miss Helen Ashton was a charming hostess at a tea which 
she gave in honor of her sister, Mrs. John Piggott of Sacramento. 
LUNCHEONS. 
FEE. — One of the prettiest luncheons of last week was given by Mrs. 

Charles S. Fee at her home in Buchanan street. 
i-i iSTER. — Miss Enid Foster was hostess at an informal luncheon in 
her home in Ross Valley Wednesday, her guests being drawn from 
the real young set who are summering on the Marin side of the bay 
or who are the house guests of friends there. 



LASSITER. — Colonel and Mrs. Wm. Lassiter ,who "Have been ordered to 
Vancouver, gave a farewell buffet luncheon at their quarters at Fort 
McDowell on Saturday. Mrs. Lassiter was assisted in receiving by 
a bevy of charming young Army girls. 
PIKE. — Mrs. Roy Pike was hostess at an informal luncheon Wednes la 
in her home in Pacific avenue, the reaison d'etre 1>ein^- her house 
guest. Mrs. Samuel Assur of Cincinnati. 
SUTTOX.— Mrs. Effingham Sutton has sent out cards for an informal 
luncheon to be given Friday in ht r home in Belvedere, in honor of 
Miss B icon of Kentucky who is the house guest of her sister, Mrs 
Graeme MacDonald. 

DINNERS, 
ARMSBY. — Miss Mary Armsby was hostess at a dinner preceding the 

danee given Saturday evening in San Rafael. 
BLACK. — Miss Louise Black, with her father, Charles X. Black, enter- 
tained at a dinner in their home in Broadway Tuesday evening in 
honor of Mrs. Norma Preston Ames, whose engagement to rlarrj 
Scott was announced this week. 
BUTTLER. — Colonel and Mis. W. C. But tier, who are making their home 
at the Cecil while Colonel Hut tie; is away from his regiment, en- 
tertained at a small dinner party on Sunday evening. 
SCOTT. — Mr. Henry T Scott was host Wednesday night at a dinner 
given in honor of the visiting delegation of prominent men who are 
here on Exposition business. 

CHILDREN'S PARTY. 
BLLICOTT.— Miss Priscilla Ellicott. the daughter of Captain John Elli- 
cott, was hostess to all the little daughters and sons of the officers al 
the Mare Island Xavy yard on Monday afternoon, when she enter- 
tained at a fancy dress party between the hours of 4 and 6. 
CRELLIX. — Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Crellin motored to San Jose Friday, 
where they were guests at the Hotel Vendome. On Saturday evening 
they were complimented at dinner by Mr. and Mrs. T. Carey Fried- 
lander at their pretty home in the Garden City. 
EDWARDS. — On Saturday evening Dr. and Mrs. James Edw ards en- 
tertained at a dinner dance at their home in Belvedere, with Mis^ 
Frances Beveridge the guest of honor. 

RECEPTIONS. 
GRAVES. — Mrs. Walker Coleman Graves entertained friends at a reception 
at her home in Scott street, the afternoon being in honor of -Mis. 
W r m. Gordon of Fresno, whoso eightieth birthday was celebrated. 
Mrs. Gordon is a prominent pioneer of San Joaquin County. 
MURRAY. — One of the elaborate functions of the past week was the re- 
ception given by General and Mrs. Arthur Murray at Fort Mason In 
compliment to the members of the Missouri Society, which numbers 
on its roster some of the most prominent citizens of this city. 
HOUSE PARTIES. 
CAPWELL. — Mr. and Mrs. Harris Cebert Capwell have opened their 
home in Brookdale. which they are occupying fur the summer, Cor b 
house party over the week-end. They are entertaining as their gut sts 
the young friends of their two daughters, Miss Phyllis Capwell and 
Miss Dorothy Capwell. 
COOL. — Dr. and Mrs. Russell Cool entertained 'a large house part} ovi I 

the week-end in honor of Mrs. Isobel Strong, who is here from s a 

Barbara. The Cools have the old Hume place neai Los G: -. one 

of the finest country estates thereabouts. 
VAN ORDEX.— Dr. and Mrs. Leander Van Orden opened their Bum ITU i 

cottage at Brookdale for the celebration of July uh. and they have 
with them several guests who will remain in the country until Thurs- 
day or Friday of this week. 

ARRIVALS. 

BALDWIN. — Mrs. Frank F. Baldwin, of Honolulu, and her young son, ar- 
rived from the Islands on the Matsonia Tuesday, and have gone to 
Saratoga. 

BANCROFT, — After an absence of several months. Mi-, and Mrs. Charles 
E. Bancroft have returned to their home in Berkeley. 

CROTHERS.— Mr. and Mrs. George Crothen? and Mis. w. II, Mills re- 
turned Wednesday from a leisurely motor tour of Santa Clara Valley. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL 8EAUTIFIER 

Removes Ton. Pimples. Freckles. Moth-Patcn«». 
Kasn and Skin Diseases, and every blemish on 
beaulv. and defies detection, ft ha* Hood the ten 
of 66 years; no oiher has. and ii so harmless we 
taste it lo be sure it is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similarname. Thedistinjruished Dr 
L.A.Sayresaidtoalodyofthehant-ton(apatient)- 
A* too ladies will nse (hem, 1 recommend 'Cob- 
rand's Cream' as the least barmiul of all the Skia 
preparations." . 

— v ^ — Forsale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infanti and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritation,, cures Sua- 
bum and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 CenU by Ma. I 
d c G P>JRAUD'S POUDRESUBTILE 

Kemoves Superfluous Hair. Price SI 00 t» i 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Propr, 37 Cm Jon= Si.. N«w Y«k C,,' 







July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Mali,. Miss ii.di ; tj maid, ihe daughter of 

Mi s. and I She i el ui ned Ivisl rei entlj 

with her m ended ^ Isit in Manila 

and China, 

HOLBROOK. .\ii. .in.] mis Charles n. Hoi brook, Jr.. have returned 
from i ■ to Hi'- Needles, Arizona, and are once again domiciled 

at their home in Filbert sti i 

HOOKER, Mi Mk-. Robert <: Hooker and their three little som will 

leave in a few daya For ting al Glen Vlpuie. 

Roberl Hunt son at Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hum. who has been 

in New Vtu u for in-- last thrt r foui months, arrived home Sat- 

■ i ■ 

LANS DALE. M.i and Mrs, Philip Lansdale and their children are here 
visiting Bishop and Mrs, Nichols from their ranch in Merced. 

MULLER. — Mrs, M. W. Muller and her daughter, prominent society folk 
ui' Fresno, are domiciled .it the Normandie Hotel for the summer, 

PALMER.— Mr. and Mrs Silas M. Palmer, who have been East, have re- 
turned in.'iii.\ ami will go to M.ulo < ■ «v must of the summer. 

PARCELLS. — Mrs. Charles Parcells is home again hum the southern part 
of the State 

PIGGOTT. — Mrs. John Plggott has arrived from Sacramento with her lit- 
tle daughter. Elizabeth Raymond Piggott, and will remain a month 
with her mother and sister, Mrs. George F. Ashton and Miss Helen 
Ashton. 

PIKE. — Mr. and Mrs. Roy M. Pike have returned from Tracy, where they 
spent several days with friends, 

UOBBINS. — Mrs. Thomas Rubbing, the former Miss Alice Ames, is here 
for the first time in a number of years, and is being greeted by scores 
of friends. 

VAN SANT.— Mr. and Mrs. Robert Van Sant of Berkeley have just 
come home from the southern part of the State, where they passed 
several weeks. 

DEPARTURES. 
ATKINS. — Mrs. Joseph Atkins, the wife of Lieutenant Joseph Atkins, of 

the Presidio, left Saturday for El Paso to join her husband, who has 

been on the border for some weeks. 
BOURN. — Mr. and Mrs. William Bowers Bourn left last Thursday for a 

visit to their home in Grass Valley. 
COLEMAN. — Mr. Wm. Caleman has returned to Monrovia after a few 

days' visit in Burlingame with his uncle and aunt. Mr. and Mrs. 

Robert L, Coleman. 
DUNNING. — Miss Helen Dunning will leave the last of this week for St. 

Helena, where she will be the house guest of Mrs. Ef. N, Chabot at the 

hitler's beautiful country home. 
FOLLANSBEE.— Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Follansbee. Jr., left Monday for 

Los Gains, where they will visit Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Searles, 
HERRICK. — Mr. and Mrs. George Anson Merrick have gone to San Mateo 

to spend a month with Mrs. Herrick's parents. Mr. and Mrs. I. B. 

Owens. 
HOWARD.— Mr. and Mrs George Howard and their sons are at Santa 

Barbara, at the Eotetl Potter, joining Mrs. Howard's mother. Mrs 

Sehmidcll, there fur the rest of the season, 
JOLLIFFE.-r-MSss Virginia Jolliffe spent the week-end in Burlingame 

with Mr. and Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson and left Thursday with h< i 

sister. Mrs. Herbert C. Moffltt, for Lake Tahoe, 
MOTJLTON, -Mr. and Mrs. Irving Mbulton left Sunday fur an extended 

motor inii through Northern California and Oregon. 
PARROTT. — The John Parrotl household Is preparing to leave shortly foi 

Santa Barbara, to be g for the summer. 

ROOS. — Mr, and Mrs. Achilles Rous have taken apartments at Del Monte 

for tin summer. 
van ECK. Baron ami Baroness Jan <'. Pantheleon van Eck are ■■-■■■ 

route tO New York. tO sail on ,lul\ 11 111 on th.- Olympic. I'pun tht-lr 

return in September thej will occupy Hi'- hum.' on Broadway of the 

late Mrs. Tii as a Magee, Sr, 

INTIMATIONS. 

BAKRON. Mrs, Edward Barron and Miss ive decided to 

Spend the \\ Inter in Sa n Mi 
CAROLAN. Mn Francis Carolari Is or hei was to Europe E 
sail from Nam S 01 N on. the 1 Hym] nth. 

DEE RING. Mi ind Mm, Franh Deerlng i theli little daughtei 

returned to theli hoi Ri 1 n 1 lid. 

DIBBLE, Mr. and Mrs Oliver Dibble are at Lake Tal where they 

we 'i the 1 

FLOOD.— Mr, James L. Flood and part) who have been gi 1 

days al 1 lob : Potter, lefl Frldaj last for Los Ang 
1 LOOD, Wtlss Core Jane Flood has engaged apartments al Del Monte for 
the Aral week in July. 

< ; 1; \ xt, Mi , and i at their 

ch In Hails Vail ej They will !••■ there the rest of the month 
i.oi'Klxs Miss 1 -[.kins will spend the coming week as the 

. | 8 j ,,1 Miss Leslie Mlllei ne In Pacific avenue. 

JOHNSON Hi nd Mra Hiram little son came 

Hum Piedmont tins week, and took possession of their new 
mi Russian Hill. 
KOHL. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kohl will ntertain U B 
. ir home on Lake Tahoi 

it, .h and Miss Ernestine M - 
v. spend the week-end al Del Monte 
Hiss \nna Peters and her n 
spend the month of July h ' ,h " ""'' 

Potter. 

, ;K |., ; Ml will spend mosl of the summer will 

ghter-tn-law riwlck Smedb 

Fovt fitiian Alien. Vermont. 



TAYLOR. Mrs, Mi 
where shfl will 1 

Mv. and Mrs. S. B. 1 

Northei nei 1 aim,,. , Ing ..1 Hotel Potter, eni 

. 
LfPHAM, ai 1 and Mi Benjamin 1 fpham are motor! 

1 1 ■]■ I- i>> awa; .1 ■ ■ ■ 1. 01 bo. 



MAYERLE-REICH. 



The wedding this week of Miss Elma B. Reich and George 
Mayerle, Jr., was a notable social event The ceremony was 
solemnized at St. Agnes' Church, where the altar was har- 
moniously and tastefully decorated with red and white roses 
and maidenhair ferns, while garlands of woodwardia deco- 
rated the pews and were swung from the chandeliers to the win- 
dows. The ceremony was performed by Father Richard Col- 
lins in the presence of two hundred guests. Special music was 
rendered by a stringed orchestra during the ceremony. The 
bride, who is a charming and attractive belle, was gowned in 
an imported frock of heavy white brocaded crepe made with 
a court train. The waist was of tulle and rare old lace, and 
was embroidered in pearls and brilliants. A smart Juliet cap 
edged with lace, and a wreath of orange blossoms held the tulle 
veil in place. The bridal bouquet was a shower of lilies of the 
valley, white roses and maidenhair ferns. 

Miss Anna Mayerle, a sister of the groom, was the flower girl 
in a dainty frock of white shadow lace. Miss Rita Sneider 
was the maid of honor, and wore a white charmeuse gown with 
an overdress of pink chiffon. The best man was Martin V. 
Merle, and Dion Holm and Royal Bronson acted as ushers. 
The groom and his attendants were students together at Santa 
Clara College. 

After the ceremony there was a reception in the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Henry Reich. The bride 
is one of the popular members of the younger set, and the 
groom is the son of George Mayerle, a well known business 
man of this city. 



STANFORD STARTED SOMETHING. 

The late Senator Stanford had no idea of the tremendous 
and world-wide industry that he started when he financed the 
experiments of Muybridge, the San Francisco photographer, 
which contained the germ of the cinematograph, and were 
the beginnings of the motion picture business. Harry C. Peter- 
son, curator of the Stanford Museum, in an address before the 
California Library Association during its recent session in San 
Diego, described these epoch making experiments. "The first 
motion pictures," he said, "were taken to show the action of 
a horse's legs when running or trotting over thirty years ago. 
Twenty-four cameras were set in a row and strings attached 
to the shutters were stretched across the track. As the horse 
ran over the track he broke each string, causing the shutter of 
each camera to open and close. It was from that beginning 
that the great motion picture industry of to-day started. It 
is interesting to note that the same shutter used long ago is still 
used on motion picture cameras. After all experiments of later 
days, a better one has not been found. 

"Six billion dollars were expended last year by the people of 
America for the privilege of watching the movie plays, and 
nearly 23,000 miles of film were printed in the United States. 
To such enormous proportions has the industry grown that 
one film lately enlarged its plant and is now prepared to turn 
out 7,200,000 feet of film every six days. Nearly 100,000 peo- 
ple are employed in the industry. One hundred plays are pro- 
duced and released for us every month." 



Man cannot live by bread alone, but if his bread was of 

the kind served at the Vienna Cafe, 171 O'Farrell street, he 
would need but little else, for at this house the staff of life is 
made a dainty confection of appetizing character There you 
can find other good things to eat in epicurean variety — a bit of 
fish, for instance, served with a rich, white wine sauce or cooked 
a l'ltalienne. These are specialties at this cafe, and they are 
supplemented by others, such as a juicy beeksteak done to a 
turn, or an appetizing salad. Now the place is easy to find, 
because it is close to all the big theatres in the heart of the 
business quarter, and a few doors east of Powell street. For 
lunch, dinner or supper it is unsurpassed. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 




Shakespeare Meets Bacon. 

William Dean Howells raises the ghosts of the two great 
Elizabethans in a delicious fantasy, wherein he is supposed to 
have met these choice spirits at an open air performance of "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream" at Cheltenham (The Seen and the 
Unseen: Harpers). They sat in front of him, and he listened 
to their talk, which was mostly of playwriting; Bacon regret- 
ting that his companion had marred the play then being pro- 
duced by putting in the rehearsal of "Pyramus and Thisbe," 
by Bottom, Snug, Starveling and the rest. He told Shakes- 
peare, also, that he should have left the Gravedigger out of 
"Hamlet," and ne expressed strong disapproval of "that fat 
rascal, Falstaff, and that drunken Bardolph, and that swagger- 
ing blackguard. Pistol." 

Shakespeare defended himself mildly: "I won't save myself 
from you behind Nature's farthingale," he said, "and I'll own 
that these fellows here are not so amusing as I once thought 
them. The fashion of fun changes. I've heard that Mark 
Twain used to say my humor made him want to cry; perhaps 
in a century or two I shall have my revenge." 

Well, Mr. Howells left Cheltenham next day for Stratford- 
on-Avon, where the Shakespeare festivals were about to occur, 
and Messrs. Shakespeare and Bacon went by the same train. 
Mr. Howells got a comfortable room at The Spotted Pard, but 
the two friendly ghosts had no such good fortune. Shakespeare 
told Mr. Howells about it a few days later. Wherever he went, 
he said, he was received with indignation — because of his com- 
panion! All through the night he went from house to house 
craving hospitality, to be scornfully ejected when it was found 
that he had with him Sir Francis Bacon, for whom the author- 
ship of his own plays had been impudently claimed. 

Among other affairs, Shakespeare speaks of his conjugal ad- 
venture thus : 

"I have never felt quite happy about the way people talk 
of Anne. I suppose it began with my leaving her my second- 
best bed in my will, but that was because she always slept in 
it at New Place, and wanted it especially devised to her. I 
made no provision for her because she was in the affectionate 
keeping of her children, and it would have reflected upon 
them if I had done so ... I don't want you to carry away the 
notion that Anne was unworthy of me, or socially unequal. She 
was seven years older than I when we were married; I was as 
ripe as she in experience, and I was a forward boy; I don't 
brag of those days of mine. The world somehow likes to think 
meanly of the wives of what it calls geniuses; but if the wives 
had their say, they could say something on their own side that 
would stop that talk. Xantippe herself might give a few cold 
facts about Socrates that would make the world sit up; and if 
Anne told all she knew about me, my biographers would have 
plenty of the material that they think they're so lacking in now. 
She was a good girl, and her people were well-to-do. . . I only 
wish I had been as good husband to her as she was wife to 
me." 

Shakespeare explains the scarcity of ghosts in this wise: 

"The incalculable majority of us never even wish to come 
back. There isn't really much meaning in our return. Some 
of you here think it would be a good thing if we appeared as a 
testimony to our continued existence, but we don't like being 
doubted and denounced as impostors when we do that, as 
occasionally happens; and it's generally felt that you who are 
here can wait, as we waited before you." 

Bacon is given to much talking and of him Shakespeare 
said in a confidential way to Mr. Howells : 

"Yes, he is often very tiresome company, especially when he 
gets to harping on my record and its sufficiency for all the 
practical purposes of the biographer. But I haven't the heart 
to stop him, for I know it forms his escape from grievous 
thoughts about himself which otherwise he could not bear. 
' * He is a riddle that I don't often attempt to read. But 



what I say is that he has long ago ceased to feel shame for his 
dishonor; but when he returns to earth the ingratitude and 
treachery he used toward those who trusted him are again an 
unquenched fire in his memory. * * I don't know how he 
tears it; and since he finds some little respite from his re- 
membrance of the wrong he did by righting the little wrong 
which he thinks has been done me, I can't deny it him." 

The Complete Trout Fisherman. 

George M. L. La Branche preaches the gospel of the dry fly 
(The Dry Fly and Fast Water, Scribner's) with enthusiasm as 
for instance : 

"The true angler is content only when he feels that he has 
taken his fish by the employment of unusual skill. The highest 
development of this skill at the present state of the angler's 
art is the dry-fly method. I do not deny that there are many 
anglers who have carried sunk fly and even worn casting to a 
high degree of specialization and refinement; yet it seems to me 
— nay, more than that, it is a positive conviction with me — 
that no manner of sunk fly, or worm, or bait casting bears any 
sort of favorable comparison to the manner of the dry-fly. 
* * * I insist that I do not make my words too strong when I 
say that in all angling there is no greater delight than that 
which comes to the dry-fly angler who simulates the hatch of 
flies and entices to the surface of the water a fish lying hidden, 
unseen in the stronghold of his own selection. Let him who 
doubts put aside his prejudice long enough to give the premier 
method a fair trial, and soon he will be found applying for the 
highest degree of the cult — 'dry-fly man.' 

"To those who have become accustomed to the belief that 
the dry-fly is adapted only to still rivers and glassy surfaced 
pools, the following statement may prove almost startling: 

Experience has taught me that the floater, skillfully handled, 
is applicable to any part of a swift stream short of a perpen- 
dicular water fall. 

The perpetual controversy among trout fishermen as to the 
realism or idealism of their lure is thus summed up: 

"In fishing with the floating fly, the imitation of the form of 
the natural insect, in my opinion, is quite as essential as that of 
its color, and frequently size will be found to be even more 
important than either. My own experiences have convinced 
me that imitation of the natural insect is absolutely necessary, 
and I put the form this should take in the following order — 
the order of their importance: First, position of the fly upon 
the water; second, its action; third, size of the fly; fourth, form 
of the fly; fifth, color of the fly." 

Mr. La Branche argues that it is practically impossible to 
imitate absolutely the colors of natural insects so that they will 
retain that color when in or on the water. He says : 

"Objects floating upon the surface of a shallow stream re- 
flect the color of the bottom in varying degree, according to 
their density. . . The use of a hook itself precludes the pos- 
sibility of any delicate imitation of nature. ... It would seem, 
therefore, that the most important consideration of the flytier 
who seeks to imitate the color of the natural insect should be 
the materials to be used. Consequently, he should select only 
those which are transparent, or at least translucent, and that re- 
flect the surroundings as readily as the natural insect does as 
it floats down stream on the surface of the water. It is, of 
course, quite obvious that the artificial, no matter how cleverly 
it may be fashioned, can present the same appearance of trans- 
lucence as the natural ; but one skillfully made of the appro- 
priate materials will approximate it nearly enough for all prac- 
tical purposes." 



OLD FORESTER 

"Its all old straight whisky." 
Sold by all dealers, clubs, etc. 

Kentucky Mercantile Co. 

SUTTER AT POWELL 
DISTRIBUTORS 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



Treatise on California Minerals. 

State Mineralogist F. McN. Hamilton announces the publi- 
cation of Bulletin No. 67, "Minerals of California" — available 
for distribution July 1, 1914. Price $1. This work, which is 
a cloth bound volume of 250 pages, has been written by A. S. 
Eakle, Ph. D., Professor of Mineralogy in the University of 
California, and is the result of many years of research and 
study of the minerals of the State. Each chemical group of 
minerals constitutes a chapter in the book. For instance, Chap. 
I — Native Elements; Chap. II — Sulphides, etc. There is also 
an alphabetical index of minerals, and one chapter is devoted 
to distribution of minerals by county. For each variety the fol- 
lowing complete information is systematically given : Chemical 
composition, crystal form, occurrence, cleavage, fracture, color, 
streak, lustre, hardness, specific gravity and a description of 
localities in California where it is found, including in most 
cases individual deposit as well as town and county. Few, if 
any, portions of the earth's surface are more interesting from 
a mineralogical point of view than is California, and the above 
treatise will prove of value to both the man who is interested 
in the presence of minerals from a purely economic point of 
view and to the student of natural history. This publication 
will be delivered, prepaid, to any address upon receipt of $1 
currency or money order, addressed to the State Mineralogist, 
Ferry Building, San Francisco, Cal. According to the usual 
custom of the Mining Bureau, the above price covers actual 
cost of printing only. 



How to Make Friends in New York. 

Sinclair Lewis, author of "Our Mr. Wrenn" — the lonely little 
clerk who at last found friends — recently stated his experience 
that "when a man is lonely in New York it's not altogether 
New York's fault. It's partly the fault of the man. New York 
isn't cold-hearted; it's merely efficient. If a man watches his 
opportunity to be friendly, he -will make friends. He must 
just eliminate any lingering traces of the snob in his disposi- 
tion." But it is another matter with the women, he says. "It 
seems to me that one of the most splendid opportunities await- 
ing the feminist movement is the cultivation of the spirit of 
friendliness among women. Feminism fully developed ought 
to make impossible the girl in the hall bedroom who doesn't 
know a soul." 



NOTES FROM SANTA CRUZ. 

The weather at Santa Cruz continues perfect, and daily the 
surf and big plunge are crowded with swimmers, while the sand 
on the beach is practically hidden by the many hued Japanese 
parasols. The hustle and bustle always attendant to a Fourth 
of July celebration at Santa Cruz has subsided, and things 
have settled down to the usual steady pursuit of enjoyment, 
which is coincident with life at a summer resort. 

The concessions and amusements this year are more numer- 
ous and of a better character than ever before. A long step 
forward, and one which will be hailed with delight by the av- 
erage visitor to Santa Cruz, is the elimination of the catch- 
penny concessions which used to line the board walk. Every- 
thing of that character has been eliminated, all the concessions 
being clean, up to date, and well managed. 

Dancing has come into its own again, the one-step, Peter Pan, 
Hesitation and Tango steps nightly being seen in the ballroom, 
as well as the old, familiar waltz and two-step. 

The U. S. S. Marblehead dropped anchor in the bay re- 
cently to pick up the local division of naval militia. She will 
return from her cruise on the 11th, at which time a series of 
elaborate entertainments and dances will be held in honor of 
the visiting sailor boys. 

Too much cannot be said about the condition of the beach 
this year, it being kept spotlessly clean, raked and scraped 
every day, so that not even a peanut shell is visible when the 
crowds arrive. The reduced prices at Casa del Rey, Cottage 
City and the Grill have resulted in many new faces this year, 
while few of the old ones are missing. 



FROM KERRY. 

I heard the lilt of my young love's song, 

As he went down the lane; 
And I wondered as I heard him go, 
"Will he come back again?" 

'Tis he will dance with the ladies gay, 

The finest man of all; 
And he'll forget the roadside dance, 

And Kerry in the fall. 

I heard the call of a lone wild goose 

In her flight toward the sea; 
"Ah, take my love a thought of home, 

And bring him back to me!" 

The mist rolls in from the silent hills, 

And the smell of peat is strong; 
The kine are gathered for the night — 

The twilight hour is long! 

The lights are lit; the stars are out; 

The evening air is cool; 
And far away, a dull, dark mass, 

The peak of Carintoul. 

"And yet, perchance, he'll not forget," 
Is what yon star would say. 
He will unlatch the garden-gate — 
The years are yesterday. 

'Tis then the mourning gulls shall scream, 

And wheel, a flash of white, 
Up, up toward the new-found sun 

That bathes them in his light. 

The hills will look a strip of green, 

The bay a streak of blue, 
For when my love comes home again 

It will be springtime, too. 

But now the night is come at last, 
The world is dark and cold; 
Ah, would my love were by my side. 
When all the world grows old! 

— Norreys Jephson O'Conor. 



"You don't mean to say your garden is already a suc- 
cess!" "Yes, sir." "But a garden is not supposed to produce 
so early." "Mine does. I have dug six cans of the finest fish- 
ing worms I ever saw." — Washington Star. 



Tommy arrived home one day with a nice new golf ball. 

"Look at the lost ball I found on the links, pa," he said. "But 
are you sure, Tommy," asked his father, "that it was a lost 
ball?" "Oh, yes," said the boy; "I saw the man and his caddie 
looking for it." — Boston Transcript. 



Pears' 

"A cake of pre- 
vention is worth a 
box of cure." 

Don't wait until 
the mischief's done 
before using Pears 
Soap. 

There's no pre- 
ventive so good as 
Pears' Soap. 

Established in 1789. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 






UTINANCIAV 



The annual statement of the Hiber- 
Hibernia Bank nia Savings and Loan Society shows 

Statement. a highly prosperous and thoroughly 

sound condition, with assets totaling 
$59,021,156.61 and deposits to the amount of $55,151,348. 
The principal assets include: 1 — Bonds of the United States 
($5,575,000.00), of State of California and cities and counties 
thereof ($6,002,350.00), of the State of New York ($1,899,000), 
the actual value of which is $13,988,091.11. 2 — Money in vault 
U. S. gold and silver coin $2,493,021.32.32; checks $51,375.25, 
total $2,544,396.57. 3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($4,856,000.00), 
the actual valje of which is $4,719,743.91, making an aggregate 
total of $21,252,231.59. 

These are all gilt edged securities of the sort described as 
"quick assets," capable of realization and conversion into cash 
at a moment's notice. They are supplemented by promissory 
notes secured on mortgages of real estate of the total value of 
$34,194,150.94. Besides the money loaned on mortgage, the 
bank holds promissory notes secured on good collateral to the 
amount of $508,330. The bank building and lot in this city 
are valued at $988,819.38, and the total real estate holdings are 
worth $1,902,635.55. 

The bank carries a reserve fund of $3,694,819.28. The 
statement in detail will be found in another column. 



Pacific Gas & 
Electric Finance. 



The Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany has announced a profit-sharing 
plan, whereby employees will be 
given an opportunity to subscribe on 
the same terms as stockholders to any part remaining unsub- 
scribed of the $12,500,000 six per cent first preferred stock. 
The subscription price is 82 V 8 . The plan should particularly 
appeal to employees from the fact that the subscriptions may 
be paid in installments. The first payment of $5 is due with 
the subscription; $15 is due August IS, 1914, and $12.50 on 
each of the following dates: October 1, 1914; January 1 1915- 
April 1, 1915; July 1, 1915; and October 1, 1915. 

The State Railroad Commission has approved the plan of 
finance announced by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company. 
The Commission orders : 
First — That the company may issue, when it desires, and sell 

l\ nnf n f *° be fixed on a PP lication t° the commission, the 
!t>5,000,000 of general and refunding bonds now pledged under 
the company's issue of one year notes, maturing March 25, 

Second— that the $5,000,000 general lien 6 per cent bonds 
also pledged under this issue of notes, shall, upon payment of 
these notes, be cancelled. 
_ Third— That the company may issue and sell $12,500 000 of 

I? ne ^L y C n reated first P referr ed 6 per cent stock at not less 
chan $82.50 per share. 

«innnnn^ That . the J COmpany may exchan ge its old issue of 
$10,000 000 preferred stock for the new preferred stock after 
July 1, 1916, at the rate of ten shares of the old stock for ten 
and a quarter shares of new stock. 

f F j ft ^!\ at ^ ith respect t0 bonds retired through sinking 
funds m 1914, the company may reimburse its treasury through 
the issuance of an equivalent amount of common stock 

The proceeds of the $5,000,000 of general and refunding 
bonds, when sold, and of the $12,500,000 of first preferred 
stock, are to be applied to the extent of $7,000 000 for the re 

IfZ^^w °l e year P° teS now standing, to the extent 
of $4 586,661 for the reimbursement of the company's treasury 
for advances heretofore made for construction, and the balance 
is to be utilized for future additions, betterments and improve- 
ments. r 

In the order, reference is made to Vice-President Hocken- 
beamer s testimony that the estimated net earnings during 1914 
after bond interest and discount will amount to $4 000 000 and 



that during 1915 the earnings will be about $3,650,000 after 
the payment of bond interest and dividends on the new pre- 
ferred stock. The commission states that the company's plan 
to sell its new preferred stock appeals to it as thoroughly 
sound and commendable; that the plan is in accord with sug- 
gestions for junior financing, which have been made by the 
commission from time to time to various public utilities; and 
that the Pacific Company's plan is worthy of emulation by 
other utilities. At the offices of the company it is explained 
that there is no present intention of selling the $5,000,000 of 
general and refunding bonds now pledged under its notes, as 
the proceeds of the sale of the $12,500,000 of first preferred 
stock will enable the company to pay all of its outstanding 
notes and to meet all of its construction requirements during 
this and next year, and that the proceeds of the $5,000,000 of 
refunding bonds, when sold, will be a part of its working 
capital. 



The refunding committee of the 
People's Water Co. People's Water Company has re- 

quested the security holders to or- 
ganize protective committees to act with the refunding com- 
mittee in working out a plan of reorganization. As it is desir- 
able that there should be a separate meeting of each class of 
security holders, the various meetings have been called for 
the following days and hours : First mortgage bondholders of 
the Contra Costa Water Company, on Friday at 10 a. m.; gen- 
eral mortgage bondholders of the Contra Costa Water Com- 
pany, Friday at 10:30; bondholders of the Oakland Water 
Company, Friday at 11 ; bondholders of the People's Water 
Company, Monday at 10. Noteholders of the People's Water 
Company, Monday at 11. Holders of East Shore and Alameda 
Artesian bonds have already appointed committees. The letter 
follows : 

"It is desired by the refunding committee of the People's 
Water Company to call your attention again to this committee's 

REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE 



| Anglo and London Paris | 
National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ATTHE CLOSE OF BUSINESS, JUNE 30, 1914 

3 

RESOURCES 
S Loans and Discounts 
V U. S. Bonds to secure circulation at par 

Other U. S. Bonds at par 

Other Bonds 

Other Assets 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit 

Cash and Sight Exxhange 



£20, 417,694. 58 
2,500,COO.OO 
155,000.00 
3,863,738.27 
400,000.00 
1,980,145.54 
11,441.685.93 
84n. 758, 264.32 






LIABILITIES 
Capital Stock 

Surplus - - - - 

Undivided Profits 
Circulation 

Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign 
Deposits - 



$ 4,000,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

279,044 29 

2,500,000 00 

1,980,145.54 

30,499 074.49 

840.758,264.32 



OFFICERS 

HERBERT FLE1SHHACKER, President 

WASHINGTON DtlDGE, Vice-President 

J. FR1EDLANDER, Vice-President 

C. F. HUNT, Vice-President 

R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier 
J C. R. PARKER, Asst. Cashier H. CHOYNSKI, Asst. Cashier 

£ WM. H. HIGH, Asst. Cashier G. R. BURDICK, Asst. Cashier 

G. F. HERR, Assistant Cashier 

A. L. LANGERMAN, Secretary 



w^tts^smmixmMiA^xYmoKKHHBSBemnxuvA 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



recommendation that the various classes of bondholders, in 
common with the noteholders, proceed without delay to the for- 
mation of protective committees to meet jointly with the re- 
funding committee. 

"As stated in our letter of June 26th, the refunding commit- 
tee considers it inadvisable to proceed further with its work ex- 
cept in conference, where each of the several classes of note 
and bondholders shall have adequate representation, and where 
all will be fully protected. Only in this way can the committee 
be confident that the final plan for the financial reorganization 
of the company will be satisfactory to all parties in interest." 



The Wells Fargo-Nevada National 
Bank Statements. Bank makes an excellent showing 

at close of business, June 30th, 
1914, as will be seen by the following statement of the con- 
dition of its affairs: 

Assets. 

Loans and discounts $19,542,913.26 

United States bonds 6,170,000.00 

Other bonds 3,657,429.30 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit 2,333,221.64 

Bank Premises, Furniture and Fixtures 2,088,529.84 

Redemption Fund with U. S. Treasurer 300,000.00 

Money on hand $3,368,329.44 

Due from Banks 8,162,349.55 11,550,678.99 



$45,642,773.03 
Liabilities. 

Capital $ 6,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 5,110,658.73 

Letters of Credit, etc . 2,387,527.57 

National Bank Notes outstanding 5,885,000.00 

Reserved for taxes 104,424.74 

Other Liabilities : Contingent Account 191,664.54 

Deposits 25,963,497.45 



$45,642,773.03 



The Anglo and London Paris National Bank makes a very 
prosperous showing in the statement issued for the close of 
the fiscal year. The assets total $40,758,264.32, and the line 
of deposits amount to $30,499,074.49. 

The statement of the Anglo-London-Paris National bank 
follows : 

Resources. 

Loans and Discounts $20,417,694.58 

U. S. Bonds to secure circulation at par 2,500,000.00 

Other U. S. Bonds at par 155,000.00 

Other bonds 3,863,738.27 

Other Assets 400,000.00 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit 1,980,145.54 

Cash and Sight Exchange 11,441,685.93 



$40,758,264.32 
Liabilities. 

Capital Stock $ 4,000,000.00 

Surplus 1,500,000.00 

Undivided Profits 279,044.29 

Circulation 2,500,000.00 

Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign 1,980,145.54 

Deposits 30,499,074.49 



$40,758,264.32 



The State Supreme Court this week 
Bonds Not Negotiable, denied the application of Isaack 
Kohn for a rehearing of the suit 
against the Sacramento Gas & Electric Company, in which such 
bonds were held to be non-negotiable. The decision, originally 
handed down in June, is so broad in its application that bankers 
are wondering whether, owing to the difficulty of trading ow- 
nership of bonds, the value of all bonds, whether for sale or 
for use as collateral security, will be affected. If the decision 

, means what they believe, legislation will be proposed to pro- 
'tect the lender as well as the borrower. In another decision 
.the Supreme Court held that A. S. McDonald paid $37,400 more 

• for a Mock of the First National Bank of Oakland sleek thar. 



the securities were worth, the judgment of the lower court 
being reversed. The case was directed against James L. de 
Fremery, the late president of the bank; George Roeth, first 
vice-president; and George D. Gray, second vice-president. The 
Supreme Court held that the evidence presented by the defend- 
ants appeared to be evasive, contradictory and incomplete. 

OBITUARY. 
Albert Pissis. 

Albert Pissis, the eminent architect of this city, died on 
Sunday last of pneumonia at the St. Francis Hotel. Mr. Pissis 
was the designer of many of the most important edifices in 
San Francisco. Pissis was one of the five architects selected as 
members of an advisory committee of the architecture proced- 
ure for the 1915 Exposition. He was a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Arts, and a past member of the San Francisco 
Chapter. He belonged to the Pacific Union and Bohemian 
Clubs, and other organizations. 

Born in Guaymas, Mexico, Pissis was brought to San Fran- 
cisco by his parents when but a youth, receiving most of his 
education here. He studied architecture in the Ecole des Beaux 
Arts in Paris, and traveled extensively through Europe, study- 
ing his profession. He entered into active practice upon his 
return to San Francisco. 



The Dauchy Company's newspaper catalogue is a useful 

work of reference for advertisers to consult. The feature of 
this catalogue which is not found in other newspaper direc- 
tories is the broad space for memoranda against each paper. 
Advertisers can use it as a complete record of all their contracts 
as well as an index to all their record books, newspaper files, 
etc. It can be procured from the Dauchy Company, 9 Murray 
street, New York, and from any bookseller. 



To-day, the Woman's Democratic Club of Alameda 

County will hold a grand Democratic rally and all-day picnic at 
Surf Beach Park, Alameda. Addresses by Hon. James D. 
Phelan, Hon. A. Caminetti, and other Democratic and Non- 
Partisans will be given. 



Mark Daniels, appointed by Secretary Lane to be land- 
scape engineer and general superintendent of the national 
parks, proposes to establish San Francisco as the permanent 
headquarters of the national park system, induce building of 
better hotels on long leases, improve roads, eliminate the army 
and substitute a force of mounted police similar to the Cana- 
dian Northwest mounted police. These are some of the fea- 
tures of a comprehensive plan to attract tourists. 



Speculators and Investors 

ATTENTION 

By order of the SUPERIOR COURT I will 
offer at Public Auction, Thursday, July 16th, 
at 12 o'clock noon at our salesroom, 41 
Montgomery Street, the choice 

BUSINESS HOLDING 

S. E. Cor. Fourth and Tehama Streets 

Near Howard St. 

SIZE — 80 by 73 

For further particulars apply to 

DAN O'CALLAGHAN 

Sole Referee 41 Montgomery Street 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



SOMETHING UNIQUE IN HOTELS. 

The General Plan of "El Mirasol," the New Santa Barbara 
Hostelry. 

One reads that facing the park in Santa Barbara, near one 
of the most beautiful missions in California, there have been 
built around a garden and grounds covering five and one-half 
acres a charming house and bungalows, called "El Mirasol." 
They have been planned for those who dislike the publicity, 
the noise and promiscuity of a large hotel, and who prefer to 
live as if at home, only without the responsibility and fatigue 
of keeping house. 

Here people will live in their own houses, which they may 
have made into 'any desired arrangement of suite, always with 
private entrance and hall. They may have breakfast, or such 
other meals as they wish, in their rooms, and use the main 
dining room, salon and library only when they so elect. 

The best type of small, smart English hotel has been taken 
as a model. There will be no band, no ill mannered and indif- 
ferent bell boys, no obligatory tipping at every turn to insure 
attention — and lo "extras." 

The bungalows have been prettily and gaily furnished in 
studied harmories of chintz and paint under the personal direc- 
tion of Mr. Albert Herter. 

Mrs. Alber. Herter, on her arrival from the East, described 
the general idea of this unique hostelry, and she said : 

"In America, so far as the comfort of real living is concerned, 
we have not yet fully reached the right plane. Our idea in 
the inception of the plans for El Mirasol was to have here a 
place in which we could give the American public the quiet 
restfulness, the comfort and the charm of a well conducted 
private country house. Now, the best type of domestic living 
is that of the English people, so we propose to try to have El 
Mirasol run on an English rather than American plan — which 
means interested persona! service of a kind not found in hotels, 
but rather in the well managed private home. 

"To go somewhat into details, that means, for example, the 
unpacking of the guest's bag or trunk, on arrival, the prepara- 
tion of one's bedroom for the night, as well as the morning care 
— which is all that is usually done — the beds 'turned down,' 
the dressing gowns and slippers put out, a thermos bottle of 
cold water and a jar of biscuit, and a score of other things that 
are ordinarily unknown in the usual hotel service. 

"Santa Barbara, being a place to which people come for 
rest and pleasure under ideal conditions, this fact makes this 
hotel seem peculiarly suited as a contribution to this city's 
needs, and the whole thing is being done not entirely in a com- 
mercial spirit, but also as a social service to the public. 

"We hear a great many rumors about excessive prices con- 
templated in El Mirasol's schedule. That is a mistaken idea. 
It may be said in a general way that all the really good hotels 
of the country have a scale of prices ranging from $5 a day 
up. That will be our basis. But we shall include at our prices 
many things that in other houses must be paid for as extras. 

"El Mirasol is intended to compete with no existing hotels. 
Its province is entirely different from that of all the others. It 
is, indeed, intended to supplement the other hotels in making 
Santa Barbara a place where every possible type of tourist 
shall be able to find just what he wants in the way of enter- 
tainment. 

"In all America there is only one other hotel run on anything 
like the plan that is to be operated here, and that is the Yama 
Yama Inn, in the Catskills, established a year ago, and which 
has created a real furore of favor among its patrons. The 
multifarious features of service include wines, massage, motors, 
horses, manicuring and many other things usually charged for 
as extras — and the guests pay for a double room as high as $40 
a day. The management of that hotel carries the thing much 
farther than we ever thought of doing." 



The Santa Cruz News reports that "the Igorotes now 

camped at the beach eat one dog a day. Yesterday afternoon, 
in the presence of several city officials, they killed a dog ob- 
tained from the poundman, cooked it up and seemed to relish 
it immensely." Now the Alameda Times Star wants to borrow 
the tribe for use in solving the public pound problem. 



The recent Congress on eugenics, 
Another Dead Law. held in Berkeley, might profitably 
have considered the dissenting opin- 
ion written by Justice Marshall, of the Wisconsin Supreme 
Court in the test case concerning the constitutionality of the 
so-called eugenics law of that State. Judge Marshall states 
the position in a plain, common sense way thus : 

"To marry is a natural right. Legislative authority to regu- 
late natural rights is limited to safeguarding these rights. The 
marriage right is a proper subject for regulation, but not legis- 
lative destruction or impairment. 

"The eugenics law requires that the male be free of disease, 
the proof to be made by scientific tests, which evidence shows 
but few doctors are able to apply and which cannot be applied 
for the fee named by law. 

"The eugenics law means a destructive interference with the 
marriage right. There is no reasonable necessity for such a 
law. It is within the power of every prospective bride or the 
parents of the prospective bride, to demand evidence of purity 
of the prospective husband. 

"There is no demand that the public should step in, because 
of danger now and then, and impose on the great mass of men 
the burdens of such a law. The act unduly casts suspicion 
of immorality and criminality of the most serious nature on 
every male candidate for the marriage state. It imposes such 
an oppressive burden as to discourage an institution which is 
absolutely essential to the welfare of the State. The tendency 
will inevitably be to promote immorality and social and racial 
retrogression." 

Restrictions on marriage, if they prove effective, must in- 
evitably work to increase vice, but we need scarcely fear any 
such result from the Wisconsin law. That statute will simply 
join the endless procession of the dead. It will never be en- 
forced, or will be evaded in a thousand and one ways. In fact, 
the law will be converted into a farce which carries its own 
moral of the futility of busybody and meddlesome legislation. 



The Bishop of Belfast worships the God of Battles, and 

believes he is on the side of the Orangemen. As to the gun- 
running exploit of the "Fanny," he said from the pulpit: "The 
other day a soldier, a man of wide experience in war, told me 
something of the story of the voyage of the 'Fanny.' He told 
me how at every point in that eventful voyage the weather 
conditions were exactly such as insured success, and then, with 
some hesitation, he added: 'There is only one explanation; 
the providence of God.' And I know now, though I knew noth- 
ing of it at the time, that continually, while the fateful ship 
was at sea, among those who knew, many hands were lifted in 
prayer to heaven." 



Fire and Automobile Insurance 

Ample Facilities for Handling Large Lines 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

WILLIAMSBURGH CITY FIRE INS. CO. - Organized 1853 

MERCHANTS FIRE ASSURANCE CORPORATION, Organized 1910 
UNITED STATES FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. Organized 1824 
NEW BRUNSWICK FIRE INSURANCE CO. - Organized 1826 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE CO. - - Organized 1822 

WM. W. ALVERSON, Manager 

374 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

SPECIAL AGENTS 



R. R. ROPER, San Francisco 
T. J. KELEHER, Lo» Angele. 



A. M. LOVELACE, Portland 
W. T. BOOTH, Spokane 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

AN INTERESTING RACE. 
Three cars were entered in a race. 

Two had a minute's start, 
And, though they set an awful pace, 

They soon fell far apart. 

Around the track for miles they sped, 

Soclosetooneanother 
You couldn't tell which was ahead, 

Nor one car from the other. 
With flying dust the air grows dense. 

Crash ! There goes a tank ! 
A car went skidding through a fence 

And overran the b 



Amid it all two cars tore on. 

Each from the wreck did swerve. 
But one went clean through Perkins's barn, 

Describing quite a r 



The other car came on pellmell, 

'Twas either hit or miss. 
A tire burst, and, sad to tell, 
It landed just like 

iSIHX 
— Otto Nedham Frankfort in judge. 

* * * 

Automobile Club of Northern California Invited 

Members of the Automobile Club of Northern California 
have been extended an invitation to participate in Automobile 
Day at the Exposition grounds on July 15th. 

Admission tickets may be obtained from the Secretary of 
the club, 410 Mills Building. 

This event promises to be most noteworthy, and it is the 
desire of the Exposition directors to have every automobile 
owner in the State of California present in San Francisco on 
that occasion. Automobiles will assemble at the Embarca- 
dero, proceeding from there along the principal streets of the 
city to the Exposition grounds, where a unique celebration 
will be held during the afternoon. 

Members of the Automobile Club of Northern California 
who desire extra tickets for the accommodation of their friends, 
may obtain additional admission cards by applying at the office 

of the club. 

* * * 

Uniform Laws Needed 

The growth of the automobile industry has originated a code 
of road and transportation laws that must conflict with many 
of the existing statutes of the various States. Many of the 
States have not revised their laws of the road for a century. 
The proposed national movement sponsored by the American 
Highway Association and the American Bar Association to re- 
codify traffic and road laws with a view to uniformity, will 
meet the approval of the motoring public. 

Economic conditions, and not State lines, control the rules 
of travel to-day. The scores of useless and unenforced statutes 
in all States should be repealed, and just as few laws newly 
enacted as will cover conditions. Those affecting interstate 



travel are the most important. Of these the greatest is the 

motor license. 

It may be found that the best solution will be to have a 
national license law, and the money so collected apportioned 
to tilt various States in ratio to their number of registrations, 
reserving a percentage for building and maintaining national 
highways. It would eliminate the many State registration 
bureaus, and reduce operating expense. 

Actual work on this National movement has already started, 
and committees appointed by the two above named associations' 
are preparing to co-operate with the United States office of pub- 
He roads. An index chart is being prepared to determine the 
lines along which revision will be sought. The subjects of 
State indebtedness for National highways, and the use of con- 
vict labor in building roads will be particularly considered. 

The Governors of the various States will then be asked to 
recommend to their respective legislatures such desired legis- 
lation. Certain basic features of good administration will be 
urged by the joint committees, such as the payment of road 
taxes in cash, the elimination of many small road officials, 
and making them appointive instead of elective. 

The effort to take highways and their management out of 
politics is sure to meet with some opposition, for in many 
States these minor road positions have been political pie for 
the men higher up to dispense. Many of the old-time farmers 
have become accustomed to pay their road taxes in labor at 
such times as suited their convenience. This latter has re- 
sulted in intermitten stretches of good and bad roads in all 
commonwealths. 

But as it is, the motor industry can and will demand attention. 
The more than a million motorists, acting through their auto- 
mobile clubs and good roads associations, are entitled to have 
road laws enacted that will not be a burden that some of them 
now are. Such pleasure and commercial traffic through this 
modern transportation means is doing more than all else to set- 
tle up outlying communities, and to extend the limits of incor- 
porated cities. Motor interstate travel is heavy. The motorist 
living along the border line of the two States does not want to 
be under the necessity of paying double registration for travel- 
ing in a limited territory, nor does he want to pay taxes to 
improve roads in one part when the adjoining part is unkept. 

First let the individual States have uniform laws; then, if 
more convenient, let motorists work for uniform National 
legislation. 

* * » 

Auto Registration 

Motor car registrations in the State Department of Engi- 
neering at Sacramento, up to the closing time, July 3d, are as 
follows: Automobiles. 105,355; motorcycles, 21,784; chauf- 
feurs, 14,885; operators, 119,062. The receipts from the motor 
tax amount to $122,506. 

* * * 

Auto Travel In Europe 

Using a single pass book, it is now possible to take an auto- 
mobile through the customs houses of practically every coun- 
try of Europe with no more formality than a few signatures 
and without any monetary transactions whatever. This new 
system, which will completely liberate the motorists from de- 
lay, annoyance and complications at frontier stations, is the 
crowning work of the National automobile clubs of the Old 
World. With this new pass book, to come into force early next 
January, there will be frequently less formality in passing from 
one European country to another country than in passing from 
one American State to an adjoining State. Travelers through 
Europe are acquainted with the old system. There were really 
two : the old-fashioned method of carrying a bag of gold, de- 
positing the necessary amount at the frontier station of the 
country entered, and collecting it after much difficulty on leav- 
ing that country; or of applying for a triptique for each of 
the countries to be visited, the necessary guarantee for the 
triptique being deposited with the home association issuing the 
document. 

The triptique was an immense advantage over the old-fash- 
ioned method. Nevertheless, it had its weak points. A sepa- 
rate triptique and a separate deposit were necessary for every 
country visited. If on leaving a country a motorist forgot to 
have his triptique signed at the frontier station, endless com- 
plication arose. Cases have arisen in which a motorist has been 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



obliged to drive across the full width of Europe in order to 
present his car and obtain a neglected signature. 

The new customs pass book has been made possible by an 
agreement between thirteen European countries, whereby a sin- 
gle deposit has to be made equal to the highest duty of any 
single country. This will be the duty required by Spain. 

To tour through the whole of Europe on the triptique sys- 
tem, taking out a separate triptique for each country visited, 
would require a deposit of about $2,600. This is calculated on 
a medium sized five passenger touring car. Under the inter- 
national passbook system, the deposit required would be $400 
to $450, according to whether the rating was made on car 
weight or car value basis. 

The pass book is available for the following thirteen Euro- 
pean countries : France, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, Spain, 
Sweden, Austria, Russia, Hungary, Denmark, Holland, Norway 
and Roumania. There being no duty for Great Britain, that 
country is not included. The United States is not a party to 
the agreement, but this does not prevent its citizens obtaining 
the same facilities as Europeans. It is recognized that until 
the individual States of the Union agree to uniform automobile 
laws, it is impossible for Washington to offer to Europe the 
facilities that Europe can offer to America. This is not the 
fault of the American automobilist, and Europe has recognized 
it by a kindly courtesy which will doubtless be appreciated at 
its true worth. 

* * * 

Don't Tinker 

One of the most important things for the automobilist to 
learn is not to "tinker." 

There is no mystery concealed under the hood of a car; 
there is nothing that should be kept secret from the owner. 
In fact, the progressive manufacturer is very much gratified 
when his customer shows a desire to learn, because the well- 
informed man is usually the satisfied owner. But the difficulty 
arises after the control of the car has been mastered, and a 
slight knowledge acquired of the care and attention that the 
car should receive. Instructive literature accompanies the car; 
magneto timing is studied, and the carburetor sometimes needs 
adjusting is learned. Enthusiasm prevails, and the temptation 
to "tinker" usually becomes too great; a delicate adjusting 
screw is turned or a wire is disconnected, and then — trouble be- 
gins. Nearly all manufacturers caution 
the owner against "tinkering." 

Talk to the repairman, study the in- 
structions, learn all you can, and then, 
when the emergency comes, you will be 
prepared. But wait for the emergency. 
Do not tinker. Don't try to make ad- 
justments when the car is already in 
adjustment. Don't begin tearing down 
until you have located the trouble. Do 
not try to improve the timing of ' the 
valves or the ignition; the manufac- 
turer knows best. 

Treat your car as you would an ex- 
pensive watch. A lot of trouble may be 
avoided by having an expert examine 
the car about once every two months. 
There are many little wrongs that may 
quickly develop into big wrongs if not 
discovered and checked. 

Don't patronize the cheap mechanic — 

his work is usually in keeping with his 

price. Keep your car out of the hands 

of the schoolboy who offers to work 

free of change. 

# # * 

A Few Don'ts 

Don't coast downhill. 

Don't go down a long, steep grade 
faster than 15 miles an hour. 

Shut off your spark on descending a 
grade, with your clutch engaged in high, 
intermediate or low, according to steep- 
ness, and use your foot brake only when 
necessary. This not only cools the mo- 
tor, but saves your brakes. 



Don't be in a hurry on mountain grades, and don't be afraid 
to make a noise so that others may know you are coming. 

When rounding curves sound your horn. 

You cannot make a sharp curve safely if going over fifteen 
miles an hour. 

Make it a rule to take no curves at a speed of over twenty 
miles an hour. 

" On mountain grades don't put too much trust on the outside 
bank, especially if your car is a heavy one. 

If you have to cool your radiator on a long hill, and you have 
the water to do it with, make a good job of it. Let the radiator 
drain while you pour in cold water until the motor is cool. If 
you have no water, a quart or two of fresh oil in the crank case 

will help out. 

* * * 

Auto Helps Churches 

On the theory that religion and good roads go hand in hand, 
business men and ministers of Roswell, New Mexico, have 
united in a unique campaign for the advancement of both. In 
a huge cup-shaped natural amphitheatre in the beautiful White 
Mountains sixty miles west of Roswell, N. M., seats for five 
thousand people are being installed, a platform built and small 
pipe organ erected. 

Good roads are being built to this old-fashioned camp meet- 
ing ground from all directions; the people of the whole south- 
east part of the State have become interested, and hundreds 
have signified their intention of camping there for part of 
the summer. 

Gospel meetings will alternate with good road meetings, a 
motion picture machine being used in both. The Ruidoso 
River, a sparkling mountain stream, abounding with trout, 
flows by the meeting ground. The meeting will begin at once 
and continue daily until the first of September. Dr. J. T. Veal, 
former Mayor of Roswell, and vice-president of the Southern 
National Highway Association, is one of the chief promoters 
of the enterprise. 

* * * 

Conventions Coming 

San Francisco will undoubtedly be the center of the automo- 
bile world next year. Not only will the Vanderbilt and Grand 
Prix and other big automobile contests be held here, but most 
of the important conventions of automobile and good roads or- 



Self-Cooled in Hot Weather 

Augmented as it is in Summer by hot road surfaces, the 
friction heat of tire-travel becomes a tire killer. Racing men 
have discovered the remarkable heat shedding powers of 

PE NN SYLVAN I A 
VACUUM 1 CUP«>TI RES 

Instead of becoming stored up in the tire the heat radiates 
completely from the Vacuum Cups and is thrown off as it 
generates, the tire being never in danger of weakening. 

Vacuum Cup Tires are— 

GUARANTEED not to skid on wet or greasy pavements, else 
returnable at full purchase price after reasonable trial. 

GUARANTEED to be immune to the rubber destroying effects 
of oil In any form. 

GUARANTEED to give a minimum of 4.500 miles actual ser- 
vice— their average service being nearer twice this figure. 

Give yourself the benefit of V. C. Safety and Service 



TANSEY-CROWE AUTO CO. 

1233 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



MARTLAND 
19th and Broadway 



CO. 

, Oakland 



Pennsylvania Rubber Co. 



OF CALIFORNIA 



160 SECOND ST. 



San Francisco, Cal. 




July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



ganizations will be held here during the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
i ational Exposition. The Exposition officials are endeavoring 
to I ring all of the motor car interests and their organizations 
.here for the annual conventions, and these, together with the 
long list of big events already scheduled, will make this city 
the real center of interest for motor enthusiasts and manufac- 
turers from all parts of the world. 

Among the conventions that efforts are now being made to 
secure are the American Good Roads Congress, the Society 
ul Automobile Engineers, and the American Automobile Asso- 
ciation. Besides these, there will be a great many of the sales 
c.nventions of the automobile manufacturers. These conven- 
tions usually are held in Detroit and other automobile manu- 
facturing centers, and if they are secured for this city it will 
mean a wide attendance of prominent business men from all 

parts of the country. 

* * * 

Auto Exports 

It speaks well for the automobile business that the exports 
of motor vehicles and parts have shown a consistent increase 
in valuation over last year, when most other manufactured 
articles ready for use show a marked falling off in exports, and 
when the total exports for ten months ended with April are 
less by $59,000,000, or nearly 2.8 per cent, than for the ten 

months ended with April, 1913. 

* * * 

Good Roads an Issue 

The Shasta County Promotion and Development Association 
tecently made the State Highway and Irrigation the main 
planks in its platform, and an active county campaign has been 
carried out along these lines by the secretary, R. J. Anderson. 
A leaflet has been printed and widely distributed with the- 
heading, "Opening and Developing an Empire," and beginning 
with the following paragraphs: 

"The building of the California State Highway, which means 
a paved street from San Francisco entirely through Shasta 
County on to Portland, is opening up an immense empire for 
settlement. 

"Such a road as this will bring into our county the very best 
class and character of settlers, people who have the money to 
help us develop our vast resources, and who will take a pride 
in seeing that our development is on a substantial and profitable 

line." 

* * * 

Weed Chains on Front and Back 

How many owners of cars realize that tire chains are just as 
necessary on front wheels as back ones? How often have you 
found when driving on our slippery streets with chains on the 
rear that you lost control over your steering, as the front wheels 
will slide against a curb even when turning at an angle. This 
is much more important on the smooth, wet streets of a town 
than on muddy country roads, where the wheels naturally fol- 
low road tracks. On the paved streets, however, which are en- 
tirely smooth, the front wheels will slide, and the driver is ab- 
solutely helpless. The only safe way is to put Weed Grips on 
the front wheels as well as the rear, trying it out first by put- 
ting one grip on the front, seeing what a difference it makes, 

and what absolute control you have of your car. 

* * * 

It was a Bulok 

Down in Butler, Pennsylvania, is an automobile expert and 
repair man by the name of Arthur Longwell, and in the same 
city there is a doctor by the name of Shultis, who formerly 
owned a car not a Buick. The doctor was a daily patron of 
Longwell. In fact, the doctor had the Longwell goat because 
it was impossible for him to keep the machine in repair. One 
day the doctor said: "Arthur, I don't believe this machine is 
very good," and Arthur in all sincerity said : "I don't either." 

The doctor inquired what machine of medium price he con- 
sidered a good one, and Longwell, being neutral in all makes, 
said there were several. The doctor asked what he thought 
of the Buick. "I think it one of the best for the money," said 
the expert. 

That was more than a year ago, and the doctor has driven 
about six thousand Buick miles without going once to the ex- 
pert for attention. "His advice to me cost him some business." 
mused the doctor, "but you can depend upon it that the first 
I have anything to do on my machine, Arthur Longwell 
will be the man to do it." 



Knox at Fire 

Working for ten hours and thirty minutes at full capacity, 
without a skip or miss of the motor is the record made by a 
Knox rotary pumping engine at the Salem fire. Officials of 
the Knox Motors Company say this probably constitutes a 
record for this class of fire apparatus, for the reason that no 
engine has been called upon to work for a greater length of 
time continuously at an actual fire. This record, they say, 
could have been surpassed by a practically unlimited period 
had the occasion required it. 

* * * 

More Suiishlne 

"It doesn't hurt a pleased man to admit that he is pleased, 
but it does scatter a lot of sunshine around," says C. H. Mc- 
Causland, of the Kissel-Kar. "I have just sold James H. Brown 
of the American Tobacco Company, his fifth Kissel-Kar, which 
is, you will say, strong evidence that he is pleased with the car. 
Still, I am none the less gratified to receive an expression of 
appreciation over Mr. Brown's signature. Among other things 
said by Mr. Brown that considerably lightens and 'gingerizes' 
the atmosphere hereabouts is this : 'Everything that a person 
could wish in a car is found in the Kissel-Kar. It is ideal." 

* • • 

Pleasing Idea 

The Diamond Rubber factories, Akron, Ohio, are putting a 
life-sized reproduction of a woman in a car and a youngster 
playing with tire irons, in display windows. The "cut-out" is 
one of the most striking ever produced. The fact that it is 
life-sized and the clever effect of color, atmosphere and sun- 
light, leads the passer-by to think, at first glance, that it is real. 
Part of a stone wall hides the fore part of the car and shrub- 
bery and other "scenery" adds to the attractiveness of the dis- 
play. The slogan, "Put on Diamonds," appears on the side 
of the car. The Diamond "Squeegee" tread is revealed, and 
the child, busily engaged in putting on a tire carries out the 

idea of the ease with which these Diamond tires are handled. 

* * * 

Republic W. M. Tread 

The Republic W. M. Tread is a recent addition to the Re- 
public tire family, but already it has made friends in all sec- 
tions of the country. It is designed for cars of lighter type, 
being made in the following sizes: 30x2, 30x3V2, and 32x3V2- 
The W. M. is a Republic quality tire, and the excellent show- 
ing it has made means that it is here to stay. 

The high grade materials used in its manufacture, and the 
fact that it is given the same careful attention that governs the 
making of other Republic products are sufficient guarantee of 
its standing in the tire world. Owners of light cars will find 

that the W. M. Tread is the best kind of tire insurance. 

* * * 

Federal Tires 

The Federal Studded Tread Tire is the most popular type 
of motorcycle tire for general use. It is constructed with a 
studded tread, which affords thorough protection against slip- 
ping or skidding, besides providing the added traction effi- 
ciency which this particular type of tread makes possible. 

The staunch construction of the Federal Studded Tread Tire 
is the strongest factor contributing to its exceptional durability 
in service. This tire is a prime favorite with a large majority 
of riders who recognize the "extra service" qualities built into 
it. The Federal Studded Tread Tire is constructed with an 
inside flap which eliminates any possibility of pinching the 

inner tube. 

* • * 

Splitdorf Magneto 

"A psychological supply and demand" is generally accepted 
by the home office of the Splitdorf Electrical Company as the 
reason for the tremendous popularity of the Splitdorf Ford 
Special high tension magneto, a comparatively new instrument 
to the automobile world, and one which is revolutionizing the 
running of thousands of the remarkable cars in every section 
of the country. 

"Psychological or otherwise," declares O. J. Rohde, manager 
of the local Splitdorf factory branch house, "the fact is, that 
a Splitdorf ignition instrument was never more popular since 
the Splitdorf bomb-firing device of Civil War days than is be- 
ing proven right here every day with the Splitdorf Ford Spe- 
cial high tension magneto. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



"San Francisco's Finest " 

Post Street Garage 



740-750 Post Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Most Modern Fireproof Auto 
Hostelry on the Pacific Coast 

I Block (rom Olympic and Bohemian Clubs— 3 Blocks from St. Francis Hote) 

Innovations in Service --- Many Distinct Ad- 
vantages—Electric Auto Charging— Supplies 
Accessories— Handsome Reception Parlors 
For Ladies and Gentlemen — Chauffeurs' 
Club Rooms. 

Courteous and Special Service lor Ladies. Transient Accommodations 

Garage Phone— Main Line. Franklin 224- 
Public Pay Station— Sound-Proof Booth, Franklin 347 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



P \C1FIC BRANCH 



OF HARTFORD 
— 301 California Street 
Telephone Sutter 3010 



Sao Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 

The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 

houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

SANTA ROSA. — GRAND GARAGE. Under new management. Third 
and Main street, opposite the court house. Phone 166. Finest equipped 
and convenient garage of any in Sonoma County. GEORGE A. ROSS, 
Proprietor. 

PETALUMA.— PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
& Murphy, Props. Cor. Third, and C Sts. ; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
general machine work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 

SONOMA, CAL.— MISSION GARAGE (Fireproof). Phone Main 741. E. 
W. Gottenberg, Prop. Full line of supplies, vulcanizing, machine shop, 
etc. Expert workmanship only. Service car and auto livery at all 
hours. 



NAPA COUNTY. 
ST. HELENA, CAL.— NAPA VALLEY GARAGE. R. A. Blum. Prop. 
Pay phone 1501; night phone S53. Supplies, oils, general repairing. Auto 
livery. Service car at all hours. Expert workmanship only. Agency 
for Mitchell and Ford cars. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
MILPITAS.— AUTO SUPPLIES. Electric welding. Complete machine 
shop. Expert mechanics. Spangler Brothers. Tel. San Jose 2603 — R. '1. 

PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle . 

SAN JOSE.— LAMOLLB GRILL, 36-38 North First street. The best 
French dinner in California. 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties 
given particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St., Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at al! hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil. 
repairing, lathcwork. vulcanizing. Open day and night. 
SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

BEACH HILL INN. — Location best in Santa Cruz, on crest of Beach 
Hill, 1 hlock from beach; 2 blocks from Casino: view of sea and moun- 
tain; appointments unique; garage near by. Address MISS A. PORTER. 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE I.ARGFST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 



Yosemite Rules 

The Yosemite Valley will soon become the Mecca for all 
motorists as the result of efforts made by Mark Daniels, of 
Berkeley, general superintendent of National Parks,_ to get- 
the viewpoint of automobile drivers making the Yosemite tour, 
and loosen the regulations wherever conditions warrant, as he 
did recently when he visited the park in a Buick six. 

Daniels, who was recently appointed to his important position 
by Secretary of the Interior Franklin K. Lane, has set about 
to encourage all travel to the Yosemite with the idea of mak- 
ing it one of California's most popular outing places. 

Appreciating the importance of the motor car in this con- 
nection, he is determined to encourage auto tours to the valley 
as much as he can without impairing the right of all other 
forms of travel and the safety of the motoring public as well. 

It was with this thought in mind that he consented to accom- 
pany C. A. Magee and G. H. McCuteon, of the Howard Auto- 
mobile Company, and F. G. Lathrop, of the Southern Pacific 
Company, on a trip to the park, in order to get at the heart of 
the complaints heretofore voiced by autoists on the rules gov- 
erning the valley roads. 

Daniels was pleased to note the courteous manner in which 
the guards handled the motorists, that most of the difficulties 
of the past were due to misundertanding of the regulations, 
which are printed to consist of sixty-four rules, but in reality 
embrace but two or three rules. 

The time allowances between controls were found as liberal 
as safety blows, with the exception of the last control, which 
Daniels conceded was all out of proportion to the condition. 
This he changed at once to ten miles per hour instead of six, 
the former schedule. 

In some places the regulations will be made more stringent 
for the safety and pleasure of motorists. For instance, no car 
will be allowed to trail another closer than 100 yards on the 
grades. This will allow dust to settle, and make for safety in 
case brakes should fail. Again, he will probably have every 
driver keep his car in gear on the down grades, not allowing 
any coasting or depending on brakes alone to stop in cases of 
emergency. In both these moves he will receive the hearty 

support of all autoists. 

* * * 

Goodyear Output 

Along with the growth of its tire business, doubling year af- 
ter year, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company now calls 
attention to the manner in which its mechanical goods business 
also has grown. The Goodyear Mechanical Department was 
created almost two years ago to balance the company's pro- 
duct, which was then confined exclusively to tires. The fol- 
lowing figures are already being quoted by Goodyear men to 
show how the business has grown : The output in mechanicals 
increased 333 per cent in 1913 over 1912. The increase for the 
first quarter of 1914 over the same period in 1913 was 480 per 
cent. For the first four fiscal months of 1914 more Goodyear 

mechanical goods were sold than all year in 1913. 
» • * 

Goodrich Tires to Japan 

A large quantity of tires has just been shipped by B. F. 
Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio, to Japan, to be used on jin- 
rikishas. Both solid and pneumatic tires are used. The pneu- 
matics are designed for the best grade of this type of vehicle, 
and come with the standard safety tread now being so widely 
advertised by this company. The Far East offers an almost 

unlimited field for both the automobile and tire manufacturer. 

* * * 

Miller Tires 

Announcement has been made by the Miller Rubber Com- 
pany, Akron, Ohio, manufacturers of Miller tires, that the 
stretch of land joining their plant at High street and Stanton 
avenue has been purchased with a view to extending their 
present manufacturing facilities, says W. D. Newerf, 589-91 
Mission street. 



Lathe Work, United States or Metric Screw Cut 

Automobile Work a Specialty. American or Foreign Care 

A Full Line of Parts and Accessories. Also Hand-Made Oil-Tempered 

Springs Always on Hand 

AUTO MACHINE WORKS 



MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 
Phone Franklin R823 



350 Golden Gate Avenue 
Bat. Hyde and Larkin Sts. 






July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



25 





EFFICIENT LUBRICATON can only be obtained 

by using the best OILS obtainable. 

HARRIS 

TRADE MARK REG. U.S. PAT. OFF, 

OILS 

GREASES 

are AMERICA'S LEADING LUBRICANTS made from premium 
Pennsylvania Crude which is acknowledged to be the best in 
the world. This fact together with the careful process of man- 
ufacture insures a perfect product— therefore perfect Lubrication. 

HARRIS OILS are quality LUBRICANTS and are bound to give 
greater power and speed and reduce maintenance cost on 
account of the soot-deposit forming ingredients being eliminated 
to the greatest possible extent. 

A Little Goes A Long Way and Every Drop Counts ♦ 

A. W. HARRIS OIL COMPANY 
Branch Chicago, 111. PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

San Francisco Los Angeles Seattle Portland Oakland Fresno 




What good are all these skid preventive devices if your 
brakes don't hold > 

And how can you depend on your brakes unless they arc 
lined with U.iybestos, the only brake lining of absolutely 
dependable safety ? 

Made of long- fibre asbestos. Insist on Raybeslos. Look lor 
the name on every foot, and the silver edges. 
The Royal Equipment Company. 1362 Bostwick Avenue. 
Bridgeport. Conn. 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 



San Francisco 
Los Angeles 



Oakland 
Portland 




US, FAT OFF 



RAJAH "GIANT PL UGS 



Actual Size 




TwoSiiesOnI) -' 3 ' ind 7* 

Price $1.50 



The " Perfection " of 
Spark Plugs 

RAJAH GIANT Plugs «re for use In 
any motor, but on account of their 
substantial construction, they are par- 
ticularly recommended for heavy work 
where a Plug is wanted that will produce 
maximum power and that can be absolutely 
depended upon for continuous service. 

The Imported Porcelains are the high- 
est grade obtainable — extra large and 
strong. The metal parts are also large 
and strong to correspond with the Por- 
celains. The machine work Is accurate 
and well finished. The centre and ground 
electrodes are sufficiently heavy for the 
strongest magneto. A Clip Terminal Is 
supplied with every Plug. Special term- 
inals tor cars requiring them. 

For Sale by All Dealers 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



Shells Moved by Auto 

Demonstrating the value of speed in transporting ammuni- 
tion utilized in the operations before Tampico, and the effi- 
ciency of both 1912 and 1913 Mitchell touring cars in moving 
shells for the artillery and cartridges for the infantry, were 
seen in a report just received by O. M. McFarland, of Osen & 
McFarland Auto Company, agents for the Mitchell car. 

Time and again the cry came from the troops fighting the 
Federal forces : "We must have ammunition." General Villa, 
himself a great believer in cross-country strategy, threw all of 
his motorcade of automobiles into service for rushing ammu- 
nition to the front. General Gavida pressed into service at 
Victoria two Mitchell cars of 1913 type and one of 1912 type, 
while General Torres sent two more Mitchells loaded to the 
point of breaking springs with heavy ammunition. 

"These cars did their work well," said one of the Mexican 
Constitutionalists. "From 9 o'clock in the morning of the day 
of the hardest attack on Tampico, until 11 o'clock that night, 
it was second-gear work for these Mitchells through the mud. 
But that ammunition had to go to the firing line, and not once 
did the automobiles fail us." 



Overland Trip In Overland Car 

Walter J. Matson, of San Francisco, has departed on an 
overland trip, bound for New York, in his Overland car. Mat- 
son, before leaving, in discussing the trip says: "We are not 
going to try for any records or rush; it is purely a pleasure 
trip. We are going to see the country through which we pass. 

"The hardest work of the journey was the selection of a car 
to make the trip. The smooth State highways and good streets 
of San Francisco gave us no idea of the riding qualities, power 
and ability of the cars offered to us. We made several trips 
out into the country, where bad pieces of roads were known 
to exist, and after testing all cars, we became convinced that 
the Overland would suit our purposes for a long journey better 
than any others. Already we have realized that we made a 
splendid selection." 

Matson will follow the Lincoln Highway all the way to New 
York City. In returning, if the weather conditions permit, he 
plans to come over the Santa Fe Trail to Los Angeles. He 
is keeping data of all road conditions for the benefit of those 
who may be touring later in the season and during next year 
when the Fair is opened. 



MoToRoL 



"It suits because it doesn't soot' 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 

If you want to reduce your oil 
expense, 

U»e MoToRoL 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



"HOOVER" 

AUXILIARY SPRING 
SHOCK ABSORBER 



Full factory equipment on all Pack- 
ard*, Oldsmoblles, Coles, Thomas and 
Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 
Full set of four— $14 to 5iS. Under 
gv compression by heavy loads, rough 
roads or bumps. Under all conditions 
rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
sible to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
617 Turk St.. San Francisco 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Com Agents 
637-39-41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging, 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything In Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phonal— Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



CLASS A GARAGE, Inc. 

Particular Service to Out of Town Motorists 
"CLUB" Service Our Specialty 

735-751 Post Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2280 



REPUBLIC 
STAGGARD TREAD 

Quality Tires for 
Quality People 

REPUBLIC RUBBER CO., of Cal. 

295 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich SL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 



VULCANIZING 



PFART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market 6 J 70 

42 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 

L. H. & B. I. BILL 

S43 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



The Jeffery Truck 

The Jeffery four-wheel drive, four wheel steel, and four 
wheel brake truck, has just arrived at the salesroom of the 
Jeffery Auto Sales Company, 56 Twelfth street, where it is on 
exhibition and for inspection by the public. 

Leon S. Greenebaum, vice-president of the Jeffery Auto 
Sales Company, in speaking of the new truck, says: "The won- 
derful demonstration of this truck under the hard and most 
severe requirements of the United States government has not 
only surprised the public, but even the designers and builders. 
The test given to the truck before it was turned over to the 
government was hard and exacting, but was nothing to compare 
with what it was put through in actual use along the Mexican 
border. 

"The result is, we know that we have a truck that will bear 
comparison with anything made to-day, irrespective of price, 
and we can guarantee every service demanded. It merely 
means whether the consumer requires a truck of its capacity." 

Rules for Pedestrians 

"With the rapid increase of the motor cars, especially in the 
cities, more clearly are becoming defined the rights and rules 
for conduct of pedestrians and drivers," says R. L. Sargeant, 
of the Fisk Rubber Company. "While San Francisco recently 
adopted an adequate traffic code for vehicles, the pedestrian is 
still allowed to endanger his life in the street with no restric- 
tions whatsoever. 

"Minneapolis, St. Paul, Indianapolis, Detroit and other 
large cities are adopting 'safety lanes' for the protection of 
foot traffic. These 'lanes' are clearly defined on the pavements 
with painted lines. The space within these lines, usually 
eighteen feet, are for the exclusive use of the pedestrian. And 
he is supposed to use it, instead of a diagonal or circuitous 
course. 

"All vehicles, whether motor driven or horse drawn must 
stop outside of the pedestrians' safety area. When the cross- 
ing patrolman's whistle blows, that is the signal for all vehicles 
in that street to line up back of the white line. This gives the 

pedestrians a protected and unhampered crosswalk." 

* * * 

Jeffery One-Ton Truck 

"The Jeffery one-ton truck, a big shipment of which will 
shortly reach San Francisco, is being used economically in 
every section of the United States," says Leon S. Greenebaum, 
of the Jeffery Auto Sales Company. "It is particularly well 
adapted to the service of music houses, nurserymen, planing 
mills, wholesale grocers, furniture dealers, lumber dealers, 
piano movers, feed dealers, brewers' light bottled goods, and 
agricultural implements. The speed controller used enables the 
owner to set the limit and speed above which the driver cannot 
operate the car. It operates from a sprocket on the left front 
wheel. It is controlled by the car speed and not by the motor 
speed. The semi-elliptic front and rear springs are made ex- 
tra heavy, but unusually wide to give flexibility. An auxiliary 
cross spring is provided to assist the main springs when the 
car is fully loaded, and yet provide flexibility when running 
light." 

* * * 

Tires Suffer by Shock 

"A good many motorists have had personal experience to 
indicate the severe nature of the 'jolt' involved as the result of 
a collision when the machine is proceeding at speed. Few 
realize what these jolts really mean in the way of a shock, not 
only to the motor car, but to the tires," says H. D. McCoy, of 
Chanslor & Lyon Company. 

"Figures show that were a car moving at the rate of ten miles 
an hour suddenly blocked by a solid wall, the shock encoun- 
tered would be equivalent to that resulting from a direct fall 
of 3 :36 feet. The effect upon a passenger precipitated from 
a car moving at that rate would be the same. At twenty 
miles an hour the shock would be equivalent to the resulting 
from a fall of 13.44 feet. Af fifty miles per hour, which is 
about a maximum for highway travel with ordinary touring 
cars, despite the fevered assertions of boastful drivers, the 
shock of collision with a fixed object would equal a fall of 86.53 
feet. The figures are based on the fundamental law of falling 
bodies, which may be reduced to such a form that the height 
of fall is equal to the square of the velocity at the instant of 
impact, divided by twice the acceleration due to gravity." 



MACHINE WORK 
BLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 

J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM, 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WQRK GUARANTEED 



F. HENDRICKS 
Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave. 
At Gough St., San Francisco 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

FRANCIS BROS., Managers 
NEW ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF GARAGE 



PHONE 
PROSPECT 1915 



1120 POST STREET 

Near Van Ness Avenue 



Protect the Health of 
your Wife and Children 

Truffauti - ffaiilord 

SHOCK ABSORBER 

"The Pioneer and The Best" 

You may not think that the jar and 
bump and shock of uncontrolled springs 
affect your masculine nerves but they do 
— and very seriously. 

Think, then, how much worse the effect on 
the more sensitive nervous system of your wife. 
Ask your family physician as to the causes of nervous 
disorders and you will see that you owe it to 
your wife's and children's health to equip 
your car promptly with the Truffault-Hartford. 

Not a luxury but a health-protecting necessity. 
Not an "extra expense" but a constant econ- 
omizer — because It keeps your tires from fighting 
the road and tearing — saves engine ad- 
justments — keeps your car body out of 
the repair shop. Furthermore, it adds a 
luxury of motion and a bodily ease that 
make motoring a new delight. Don't fail 
to send for Catalog today and learn the 
many ways in which the Truffault-Hart- 
ford Increases your enjoyment. 
Four models, SI 6, $35. SSO, S60. Any car. 
Ipsim Upon Truffault-llirlfords on Your New Car 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION GO. 

I inv \RD V. HARTFORD, Pros. 

Office and Works ; 174 Bay St., Jersey City, N. J. 

Vunu/irClirir. Ol Hartford I ' Uclrlc 

Starting and UghHnn Sptam 
DISTRIBUTORS 

CHANSLOR & LYON COMPANY 

Portlind Oakland Los Angeles 

9««ttle San Francisco 

Spokaot Frr<.no 






28 



San F 



rancisco 



News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



1863 1914 

FIFTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets, $10,000,000 



FIRE 



MARINE 



AUTOMOBILE 



California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

- Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams, Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance. Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Miller, President: L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident an 
Health Department. 

Head Office- -Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

CHARTERED 1850 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

The Insurance Exchange, San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager Guy Francis, Asst. Manager 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California, Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

The Home Insurance Company 



Organized 1863. 



Cash Capital, $3, 000. 000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
Are. Automobile insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by fire. 
H. L. ROPF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent 

324 Sanioma Street, San Francisco, Cat. 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



New York Stock Exchange 

New York Cotton Exchange 

Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange, San Francisco 



Offices 
MILLS BUILDING 
and 
PALACE HOTEL 



Branch Offices 

Los Angeles Sao Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland, Ore- 
Seattle. Wash. 



NEW PARISIAN FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. C. La FON 

First Class Work at Reasonable Prices 

Laces and Lace Curtains a Specialty 

Club, Restaurant and Hotel Service 

991 OAK STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO Phone Park 4962 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending June 30. 1914. a dividend has been declared at 
the rate ot four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable on ami 
after Wednesday. July 1. 1911. Dividends not drawn will he 'added to de- 
positors accounts, become a part thereof, and will earn dividend from 
July 1 1914. Deposits made on or before July In, 1914. will draw interest 

?!2, J y, 1 ' 191 ,i- , . R - M - TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market. McAllister and Jones streets. 




JINSVMCE 




The Life Underwriters' Association of Oregon passed the 
following resolution at their regular monthly meeting in June. 
It was moved, seconded and carried that the delegates from the 
Life Underwriters' Association of Oregon to the National Con- 
vention are hereby instructed to vote for San Francisco as the 
convention city for 1915. The following resolutions were re- 
cently passed by the Puget Sound Life Underwriters' Associa- 
tion: "Resolved, That the Puget Sound Life Underwriters' As- 
sociation endorse heartily the movement for the World's Insur- 
ance Congress, to be held in San Francisco, in connection with 
the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, in 1915, and that 
this association pledges its support to the World's Insurance 
Congress in every possible way," and "Resolved, That the 
Puget Sound Life Underwriters' Association note with feelings 
of satisfaction the setting apart of one day each year to be 
observed as 'Insurance Day,' and that this Association pledges 
its support to the movement." 

John E. Phelps, appointed by Governor Johnson, of Califor- 
nia, to succeed E. C. Cooper, has been a local fire insurance 
agent at Los Angeles for many years, and derives his knowl- 
edge of insurance from that source. He is secretary of the Los 
Angeles Fire Underwriters' Association, an association of local 
agents, and also vice-president of State Association of Local 
Agents. His appointment is for the full term. He won out in 
warm competition with Frank E. McMullen, agent of the Mas- 
sachusetts Mutual Life, and a former president of the National 
Association of Life Underwriters, who had the backing of the 
life men. Phelp's affiliation with close political adherents of 
Governor Johnson gave him the advantage in the race. 

* * * 

Whitney Palache, vice-president of the Hartford Fire Insur- 
ance Company, who is visiting the coast, was entertained by 
the World's Insurance Congress committee at a luncheon given 
at the Palace Hotel, Tuesday, July 7th. President T. L. Miller, 
of the West Coast Life and Pacific Coast Casualty Co., pre- 
sided as toast master, and a royal welcome was extended to 
the visitor, who for many years resided in San Francisco as 
Pacific Coast representative of the Hartford, and is very popu- 
lar. Mr. Palache has interested himself actively in the promo- 
tion of the Congress, and it is owing to his efforts more than 
any other influence that the National Board has decided to 
prepare a fitting exhibit for the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition. 

No successor to Manager Wilson in the Fireman's Fund's 
Southeastern department will be made until President Faymon- 
ville visits Macon, which will not be earlier than September. 
The company has perfect confidence, meanwhile in the ability 
of Assistant Manager E. T. Gentry to intelligently look after 
its affairs. So far as the removal of departmental headquar- 
ters from Macon to Atlanta is concerned, President Bernard 
Faymonville is authority for the assertion that the project is 
something which will not even be considered until after he has 
had opportunity to visit Macon, if then. 

* * * 

The Prudential Casualty Company of Indianapolis has re- 
tired from California, the company ceasing to write business 
on July 1st. Outstanding claims will be adjusted by former 
manager Clarence Philipp, who goes with the Pacific Depart- 
ment of the United States Casualty as special agent. The com- 
pany recently discontinued the writing of compensation busi- 
ness in California. 

Edward Van Bergen Halden, a well known and wealthy in- 
surance man, surprised his friends on July 2d by eloping with 
Miss Emma Marie Ermit, an estimable young lady and popular 
belle of San Francisco. Young Halden is a son of the late Ed- 
ward B. Halden, formerly associated with Mr. Butler under the 
firm name of Butler & Halden in a coast general agency. 



July 11, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



29 



Mr. E. G. Halle, Manager of the Germania Fire Insurance 
Company, of Chicago, 111., who sailed for Europe the first part 
of June, has been delegated a special commissioner by Com- 
missioner Hathaway, to interest European insurance men in 
the World's Insurance Congress events. Mr. Halle is a dele- 
gate of the Western Insurance Bureau to the "National Council" 
of the World's Insurance Congress. Mr. G. H. Lermit, Presi- 
dent of the Western Union of Fire Underwriters, Chicago, 111., 
and a member of the Committee on Participation and Attend- 
ance of Fire Insurance Companies, has been appointed a "Spe- 
cial Commissioner" to interest English underwriters in the 
World's Insurance Congress events during his trip to England. 

* * * 

R. R. Roper, who last week resigned as special agent of the 
National Union, after a service of eight years with that com- 
pany, to accept the position of field man for the New Bruns- 
wick, North River, Williamsburg City, Merchants and United 
States fire insurance companies, under Pacific Coast Manager 
W. W. Alverson, is one of the oldest and best known specials 
on the coast. He will cover Northern California and Southern 
California. 

Owing to the withdrawal of Ira B. Cross from the secretary- 
ship of the California Industrial Accident Commission to join 
the faculty of the University of California, as previously an- 
nounced, H. L. White has been appointed to succeed him. 

* * * 

The license of the California Accident Association of Los 
Angeles is being withheld by the California Insurance Depart- 
ment until a more satisfactory exhibition of its condition shall 

be made. 

* * * 

Major Francis V. Keesling, vice-president of the San Fran- 
cisco Life, announces himself a candidate for the Governorship 
of California, and has begun an active campaign for the nomi- 
nation. 

* * * 

Assistant Secretary F. S. Danforth, of the Millers' National 
Insurance Company, of Chicago, has returned home after hav- 
ing appointed J. H. Richards general agent for California. The 
company is already writing in Washington and Oregon. 

* * * 

H. A. Sharpe has been elected president of the recently or- 
ganized Life Underwriters' Association of Snohomish, Wash. 

The Western States has made Jesse C. Connor agency or- 
ganizer for Northern Idaho and Washington. 

* * * 

The Maryland Casualty has appointed John A. Whalley its 
representative for Alaska. The firm already represents the 

Maryland Casualty in Washington. 

* * * 

A complete auxiliary fire alarm system has been installed in 
the Royal Building, San Francisco, owned by the Royal Insur- 
ance Company. 

* a * 

Pacific Coast Manager Avery says that the Fire Association 
has made arrangements to enter Alaska, and will probably 

establish itself at Alberta, British Columbia. 

* t • 

General Agent Ankele has appointed William H. Cramp 
special agent for the Occidental Fire. He will cover Southern 
California. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets', also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Help Your Eyes 

by rsis<; 
Mayerle'fl glttsee rhey nr.< highly recommend 
weak eyes, poor sight, Btrali rchy. mtery. 

Inflam log spots, crusty or RTftnu- 

lntei) i i rmatlsm. heani 

children's ayes and i i 

Two gold medals and, diplomas ol honor awi fornia Industry 

Exposition, also a1 Mechanics' Fair. October, i 1 .". 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Qnaduate German Expert Ol 

Rter.San Francisco. Mayerl mail 66c. 




Off We Go 




for the best time of 

our lives with our 

ordinary row boat 

and a sturdy little 

Caille Portable Boat 

Motor. It takes 

us skimming' over 

river and lake at 

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market. Let ▼ 

us prove it. 

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DISTRIBUTORS FOR CALIFORNIA 

68 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
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Battery and Jackson Streets 



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BRUSHES 



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Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792 
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30 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



JAMES KEANE ACADEMY 

of Motion Picture Acting 

at the UNITED KEANOGRAPH FILM MANU- 
FACTURING CO., Studios— Fairfax, Matin County. 



1 hour from 
San Francisco, 
Telephone San 
Rafael 8 7 O. 
The finest mo- 
tion p ictu re 
studio in the 
west where re- 
fined students 
will be given 
practical stage 
and acting ex- 
perience before 
the camera, 
Write for a 
booklet. 




H 



Y 



ITCHCOCK 
MILITARY 

ACADEM 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

Summer Camp Now Open 

For Information Write to Principals, 

REX W. SHERER and 
S. J. HALLEY 



The Beringer Conservatory of Music 

926 Pierce Street near McAllister Street 
PHONE WEST 7893 SAN FRANCISCO 

Directors: Joseph Beringer (Concert Pianist) 
Mme. Jos. Beringer (Concert Contralto) 

Thorough education in Pianoforte Playing and Singing. 

Special departments for beginners, amateurs and 
professionals. Pupils prepared for the operatic and 
concert stage. Opportunities given to advanced piano 
and vocal students to join the well known Beringer 
Musical Club for public appearances. 



Miss Harker'S School California 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits 
to Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith 
and Mills. Intermediate and primary departments. 
Great attention given to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home 
Economics. Special nurse for younger children. 
Ninth year. Catalogue upon application. 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 CALIFORNIA STREET 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 

Sketching 

Painting 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 

Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men forentrance 
to the universities. The location, adjacent to Stanford Univer- 
sity and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes 
possible a school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 
The next semester begins August 25, 1914. For catalogue 
and specific information, address 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master 




The Irish Volunteers. 

Two armies more or less organized stand face to face in 
Ireland to complicate the Home Rule situation. This new 
factor in the situation led the Nation to remark: "Liberals 
as well as Conservatives had better, we think, be frank with 
themselves and admit that there is at this moment very little 
government in Ireland. Both the old machinery and the old 
moral restraints have virtually ceased to run. The Union, the 
nominal symbol of Anglo-Irish relationships, lies on a death- 
bed from which there can be no resurrection. But something 
has arisen in its stead. The Times correspondent hardly ex- 
aggerates when he says that 'the whole of Ireland is on a war 
footing.' 

"On the general position, the emergence of the volunteer 
movement has had a striking effect," says the Daily News. "It 
has changed the atmosphere in Ulster as much as in Parlia- 
ment. The attitude of Ulster to Nationalist Ireland has always 
been largely one of contempt. This attitude has vanished be- 
fore the startling demonstration of the past month, and the 
whole character of the controversy is changed. There is respect 
where there was formerly only scorn. It is not impossible that 
this new feeling will have a profound effect on the situation." 

Professor Kettle published in the Manchester Guardian a 
long letter on the Irish Volunteers, from which we quote two 
significant passages : 

"Two critical situations may arise. The Carson gospel has 
been preached as more or less respectable rebellion; it has been 
interpreted by its baser followers as an incitement to bullying, 
riot, and, in last resort, murder of isolated Nationalists. Should 
that gospel come to practice, it is the duty of the government 
to crush it instantly and completely. Should the government 
fail to do so, the action of the Irish Volunteers can be clearly 
foretold. At the first unpunished massacre of isolated Nation- 
alists, the guns will go off of themselves. Whatever the Irish 
Party or the 'larger Nationalists,' or anybody else may advise, 
the nation will, by the same spontaneous impulse that created 
the Volunteers, use them to chastise the assassin and the swash- 
buckler. 

"A much more rational and pleasant prospect is, one is glad 
to say, infinitely more probable. Should the will of Parliament, 
as expressed in the Home Rule settlement, be accepted by 
Northeast Ulster without what they are pleased to call civil 
war, then the Irish Volunteers will peacefully pursue their 
natural line of development as a territorial force under the re- 
gime of the Irish Parliament. They will solve for Ireland the 
problem of home defense against invasion. Irish friendship 
and Irish rifles will transform what is now the most menaced 
into the least vulnerable corner of the Empire. 

"Public opinion is," in the opinion of the Spectator, "growing 
more and more pessimistic in regard to the possibilties of a 
peaceful settlement of the crisis caused by the Home Rule 
Bill. Yet strange as it sounds, all that now separates the two 
parties is a question of area. The case has been 'pleaded 
down' to that apparently narrow issue. The real point in dis- 
pute is whether all Ulster or only a part, and if so what part, 
is to be excluded. In these circumstances one's first feeling is 
that the two parties have got so near to a working agreement 
to avoid civil war that it must be possible by a little further 
mutual concession to reach actual agreement. It would be per- 
fectly preposterous, it will be urged, to fight over a mere ques- 
tion of area. The matter is clearly ripe for compromise." 



The Militant Suffragists. 

The campaign of the militant suffragists was the subject of 
a very important utterance by the Home Secretary in the House 
of Commons. Mr. McKenna, in defending the measures taken 
by the government for dealing with the militants, announced 
further action in the way of proceeding both civilly and crimi- 
nally against subscribers to the funds of the militant organi- 
zation. After condemning the militants' gross rudeness to the 
King, he discussed the various suggestions made for repressing 
the militants. These had been: (1) Let them starve if they 






July 11, 1914. 



will; (2) Deport them; (3) Treat them as lunatics. "Wisely, as 
we may think," says the Spectator, "Mr. McKenna pointed out 
that to let them starve themselves to death was not a possible 
policy. Not only would the prison doctors refuse to stand by 
and see a woman starve herself to death when it could be pre- 
vented, but he himself would never take a hand in such a 
policy." 

Mr. McKenna ended by showing that the allegation that the 
"Cat and Mouse" Act had failed was not true. Of the eighty- 
three persons who had been tried under it, fifteen had given 
up militancy, six had left the country, twelve were in hiding, 
while the remainder were liable to rearrest if they left their 
places of abode." 



and California Advertiser 



31 



The Russian Peasant. 

"A revenue steadily increasing from year to year, overtaking 
the most sanguine expectations of the exchequer, and more 
than keeping up with the apparently insatiable demands for 
national defense and for the education of the masses, has now 
induced serious misgivings," says the Times in its last Russian 
Supplement, "on account of the fact that a large proportion of 
it was derived from the sale of drink. Nothing that affects the 
good of the peasants, who form the enormous majority of his 
subjects, could be a matter of indifference to the Tsar. No 
sooner had the country attained a measure of internal order and 
tranquility and the national defense services been placed upon 
a satisfactory footing than his Majesty decided to take up a 
firm and resolute attitude against the drink evil. The peasants 
have made a very remarkable response to the Little Father, 
and the government is backing them up. 

"This is both gratifying and encouraging for the future, but 
no one who is at all acquainted with village life in Russia, and, 
after all, it is the villages which are the best customers of the 
State liquor monopoly, will expect that the virtuous resolutions 
passed by many peasant villages will in all cases be long 
lived." 



In Aid of Shipping. 

In the British House of Commons, Mr. John Burns secured a 
second reading for his Merchant Shipping Convention Bill, and 
the public will welcome its addition to the Statute Book. Some 
of the statistics cited made a deep impression — for instance, 
his grim reminder that in the last twenty years 4,700 British 
vessels of 3,000,000 tons had gone down, together with 18,474 
human lives. "This bill," says the Liverpool Post, "provides 
against all conceivable fatalities that may be classed under the 
heading preventable. The compulsory use of wireless telegra- 
phy is imposed on all ships carrying more than fifty persons, 
either passengers or crews, and the rules governing the use and 
provision of life-saving appliances and the construction and 
manning of ships are thoroughly overhauled. Special attention 
is paid to the North Atlantic region, where it is very necessary 
that practical measures should be taken to protect shipping 
from the dangers of floating ice and derelicts, and from the 
confusion that arises when there is any uncertainty about the 
routes adopted in the North Atlantic by different shipping com- 
panies." 



When you have a party at your home you will give your 

friends a better time by treating them to a real old-fashioned 
Kentucky cocktail, made with "Old Forester" whisky. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets: also at Fairmont Hotel. 




Fast Electric Trains 



TO 



Sacramento 



The Wonder Trip 

Entire line equipped with Automatic Block Signals. 
Observation cars operated. Safe — Quick. 

Oakland Antioch & Eastern Railway 

San Francisco Depot— Key Route Ferry 
Phone Sutter 2339 



i««mrm< 



HUNTER 
BALTIMORE RYE 



'A 
i\ 

n 
n 

i 



ITS CHARACTER AND 
GENERAL EXCELLENCE 
REMAIN UNCHANGED 
AFTER MORETHAN FIFTY 
YEARS OF UNPRECE- 
DENTED POPULARITY 
AND WIDESPREAD DE- 
MAND. AN ABSOLUTELY 
PURE RYE WHISKEY. 




Sold at all first-class cafes and by Jobbers. 
WM. LANAHAN & SON, Baltimore. Md. 



ALREADY UNDER WAY 

The Collection of Properties for a 

GREAT NEW 
AUCTION 

of Real Estate Within the Next Ten Weeks 

REMEMBER ! ! 

This Auction Mart Solves the Problem 

IF THERE IS A BUYER 

For Your Property in the Market 

YOU CAN FIND IT OUT 

Write or See Us Now 

A. J. RICH & COMPANY 

AUCTION DEPARTMENT 

58 SUTTER ST. Holbrook Building 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 
W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
emoves corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and In- 
crowing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
hank Bldg.. 830 Marke't St. Tel. Kearny 3678. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery SL. above Bush. San Pran- 

-l«rn r*Al Phone rtoufflss 601 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 2230 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 11, 1914. 




She — What would you do if I were to die ? The Brute — 

Open a banking account. — London Mail. 

"What is your alma mater, Mr. Nurich." "Well, if you 

insist, I'll take a cigar." — Buffalo Express. 

"What kind of a plant is the Virginia creeper?" "It 

isn't a plant; it's a railroad." — Columbia jester. 

The Grouch — Ten reels and just one man killed — and 

you call this a play!" — New York Evening Post. 

"Say, have you forgotten that you owe me a hundred 

francs?" "No; not yet. Give me time." — Pele-Mele. 

Fred — V/hat kind of a fellow is he ? Ned — If you should 

tell him that seeing was believing, he wouldn't look. — Judge. 

Willie— What kind of a book is "Who's Who," dad? 

Crabshaw — It's a work, my boy, in which others see us as we 
see ourselves. — Life. 

"He looks like a fool!" "But, papa, he has asked me to 

marry him." "He has? Well, don't ever tell me I can't size 
up people." — Houston Post. 

Mr. Nurich (reading) — Saltillo was taken without a bat- 
tle. Mrs. Nurich — It isn't often those gunmen give up without 
a struggle. — Buffalo Express. 

"I hear the sea captain is in hard luck. He married a 

girl, and she ran away from him." "Yes; he took her for a 
mate, but she was a skipper." — Tit-Bits. 

Her Father — You expect me to support" Margaret in- 
definitely? Her Husband — Well, I hope you may stand from 
under very gradually, sir. — Boston Transcript. 

"Aren't some of the hats women wear absurd?" "Yes," 

replied Miss Cayenne, "and yet when some people put them 
on they do look so appropriate." — Washington Star. 

"I was so disappointed that I was out the other day when 

you called, Miss Percival." "So was I. I felt sure I'd find 
you, because as I turned the corner I saw you go in." — Boston 
Transcript. 

Owner — Here, what are you doing? Don't you know 

you're not allowed to take fish out of this water? Angler 
(three hours without a bite)— I'm not taking them out; I'm 
feeding them. — Tit-Bits. 

The Young Bride — I didn't accept him the first time he 

proposed. Miss Ryval (slightly envious) — I know you didn't, 
dear. The Young Bride — How do you know? Miss Ryval — 
You weren't there. — Sketch. 

"He who puts his hand to the plow," screamed the cross- 
roads orator, "must not turn back!" "What is he to do when 
he gets to the end of a furrer." asked the auditor in the blue 
jeans overalls. — Christian Register. 

Squire — I've not seen old Mrs. Wiggins lately. How is 

she? Mrs. Appleby — Dead, sir. Squire — What, joined the 
great majority? Mrs. A. — Oh, no, sir; she was a good enough 
woman, as far as I know. — London Opinion. 

Mrs. Kawler (to hostess's child) — Are you glad to see 

me again, Edith? Edith — Yes'm; and mamma's glad, too. Mrs. 
Kawler — Is she? Edith — Yes; she said she hoped you'd come 
to-day and have it over with. — Boston Transcript. 

A well known actress, who is very fond of dogs, num- 
bers among her possessions a magnificent specimen of the St. 
Bernard type. One day last summer a New Yorker, who vis- 
ited the actress at her summer home, met a colored maid in the 
road, accompanied by this big dog. He asked to whom the 
canine belonged. "He b'longs to my missus." "Aren't you 
afraid of him? He's awfully big." "No, indeed, suh. Dis dog 
won't harm nobody; he's jest chuckful of fun all de time." 
"What kind of a dog is he?" "Well, suh, I hears my missus 
call him a full-blooded Sam Bernard." — Brooklyn Life. 



Casey— Did vez know Pat Ryan who's just _ died? 

O'Brien — Oi did! Shure, he was a near relation av mine; he 
wance proposed to me sister Kate.— Boston Transcript. 




The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone: Franklin 2960 




MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 
151-1S7 Ellis Street -17 Glasgow Street 

Phone Douglas 1010 . 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

SOc 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Claret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR J1.00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 

Music Every Evening 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin » 



No visitor should leave the city without seeing; the 
finest cafe in America 



I. B. Pon 



J. Bergez 



C. Mailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

4)5-421 Bush St., San Francisco (Above Kearny) Exchange, Douglas 2411 



Phone Sutter 1672 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Rittmanf 
C. Lahederne 1 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTONI) 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine. $1.00. Banquet Halls and 
Private Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 



362 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Opposite S. F. Chronicle 



JULES RESTAURANT 

Fish Fresh Daily; Salads and Shell Fish a 
Feature. Special 50 cent Lunch. Ladies' 
Dining Room, Entrance on Market Street. 
From 5:00 to 8:30 Dinner with Wine $1.00. 
Music and Singing. 
Phone Kearny 1812 Phone Kearny 3087 



STATEMENT 

of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities 

OF 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society 



HIBERNIA BANK 

DATED JUNE 30, 1914 



ASSETS 

1— Bonds of the United States ($5,575,000.00), 

of the State of California and Cities and 

Counties thereof ($6,002,350.00), of the State 

of New York ($1,899,000.00), the actual value 

of which is $13,988,091.11 

2 — Cash in Vault: U. S. Gold and 

Silver Coin $2,493,021.32 

Checks 51,375.25 

$2,544,396.57 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds ($4,856,000.00), the ac- 
tual value of which is 4,719,743.91 



$21,252,231.59 



They are : 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway 
Company 5 per cent Bonds" ($476,000.00), 
"Southern Pacific Company, San Francisco 
Terminal 4 per cent Bonds" ($150,000.00), 
"Western Pacific Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds" ($127,000.00), "San Francisco 
and San Joaquin Valley Railway Company 
5 per cent Bonds" ($30,000.00), "Northern 
California Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Market Street Rail- 
way Company First Consolidated Mortgage 5 
per cent Bonds" ($728,000.00), "Los Angeles 
Pacific Railroad Company of California Re- 
funding 5 per cent Bonds" ($400,000.00), 
"Los Angeles Railway Company of California 

5 per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00), "The Om- 
nibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" 
($167,000.00), "Sutter Street Railway Com- 
pany 5 per cent Bonds ($150,000.00), "Gough 
Street Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($20,000.00), "San Francisco, Oakland and 
San Jose Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($5,000.00), "The Merchants' Exchange 7 
per cent Bonds" ($1,400,000.00), "San Fran- 
cisco Gas & Electric Company 4 1 2 per cent 
Bonds" ($535,000.00)), "Los Angeles Gas 

6 Electric Company 5 per cent Bonds" 
($100,000.00), "Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany 4 per cent Bonds," ($50,000.00), "Ger- 
man House Association 6 per cent Bonds" 
($101,000.00.) 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 34,194,150.94 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows : They are all existing Con- 
tracts, owned by said Corporation, and are 
payable to it at this office, which is situated 
at the corner of Market, McAllister and Jones 
streets, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, State of California, and the payment 
thereof is secured by First Mortgages on Real 
Estate within this State and the States of Ore- 
gon and Nevada. Said Promissory Notes are 
kept and held by said Corporation at its said 
office, which is its principal place of business, 
and said Notes and debts are there situated. 



5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby se- 
cured, the actual value of which is 508,330.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and 
debts is as follows : They are all existing 
Contracts, owned by said Corporation, and are 
payable to it at its office, which is situated 
as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is se- 
cured by pledge and hypothecation of Bonds 
of Railroad and Quasi-Public Corporations 
and other securities. 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and 
County of San Francisco ($1,902,634.55), and 
in the County of Santa Clara ($1.00), in this 

State, the actual value of which is 1,902,635.55 

■(b) The Land and Building in which said 
Corporation keeps its said office, the actual 

value of which is 988,819.38 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it 
belongs to said Corporation, and part of it is 
productive. 

7 — Interest on Loans and. Bonds — uncollected and 

accrued 174,989.15 

TOTAL ASSETS $59,021,156.61 



LIABILITIES. 

I — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to 

and the actual value of which is $55,151,348.48 

(Number of Depositors, 85,363 
Average Amount of Deposits, $646.08) 
2 — Contingent Fund — Accrued In- 
terest on Loans and Bonds $ 174,989.15 

3— Reserve Fund, Actual Value... 3,694,819.28 

3,800,808.43 



TOTAL LIABILITIES $59,021,156.61 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By CHARLES MAYO, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County of San Francisco — ss. 

CHARLES MAYO and R. M. TOBIN, being each duly 
sworn, each for himself, says : That said CHARLES MAYO is 
President and that said R. M. TOBIN is Secretary of THE 
HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the corpora- 
tion above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. 

CHARLES MAYO. President. 
R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of July, 1914. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY, 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco, State of California. 







_ Tfc' 



Miss Margaret WoodrowWilson 
daughter of the President 
listening to her own voice 
singing "The Low-Backed Car" 
(ColumbiaDisc Record No. 36860) 
played on her own Columbia 
Grafonola 



Painted from photo by 
Edmonston, Washington, D.C. 



Columbia 

G362Woolworih 




Graphophone Co. 

Building , NewYbrk. 



SAN FRANCISCO STORE 334 SUTTER STREET 



DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



FIFTY-EIGHTH ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 




R ! 


*$ 


i 




P 










7 


1 






V! loop on the C&fifoftrta Western Rail^ 
and .Navigation Company's. Ro?. 



CALIFORNIA WESTERN RAILROAD AND NAVIGATION CO. 



The Scenic Line of California B^.ween Willits and Fort Bragg 

40 miles of unsurpassed scenery through the celebrated redwood forests, along the beautiful Noyo River and through the 
coming apple country of the State. 

Visit The Noyo River Tavern 

The Finest Resort in The State 

On the line of the railroad, midway between Willits and Fort Bragg. Fishing and hunting unexcelled. Beautiful scenery, 
tennis, swimming, dancing, horseback riding. Picturesque mountain trails. High grade cuisine. Climate unsurpassed. 

For reservations and full information, call at 1017 Crocker Building, San Francisco. Telephone: Kearny 2260. 




The New Poodle Dog 




HOTEL 

and 

RESTAURANT 

WILL REMAIN 

At Corner 

Polk and Post 

Streets 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone: Franklin 2960 




MAISON DOREE 

HOTEL and RESTAURANT 

151-157 Ellis Street 47 Glasgow Street 

Phone Douglas 10-10 

TRY OUR SPECIAL 

SOc 4-COURSE QUICK LUNCHEON 

With Ciaret, or Glass of Beer, Tea or Coffee 

From 11 a. m. to 2 p. m. 

OUR SI. 00 DINNERS ARE, POSITIVELY 
THE BEST IN TOWN 

Music Every Evening 



BLANCO'S 



O'Farrell and Larkin 
Streets 



Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 
finest cafe in America 



J. Bergez 



C. Mailhebuau 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old POODLE DOG Co. 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 
MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT EVERY EVENING 

415-421 Bush St.. San Francisco (Above Kearny) Exchange. Douglas 2411 



Phone Sutter 1572 



Cyril Arnanton 
Henry Fittmani' 
C. Lahederne 1 



NEW DELMONICO'S 

(FORMERLY MAISON TORTON1) 

Best French Dinner in the City with Wine, $1.00. Banquet Halls and 
Private Dining Rooms. Music Every Evening. 



362 GEARY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JULES RESTAURANT 



MONADNOCK BUILDING 
Opposite S. F. Chronicle 
Evenings from 5:30 to 9:30 
A French Dinner including Wine, ONE DOLLAR. 
A Variety of Special Cooked Dishes for Immediate 
Service. 

An Enlarged Orchestra and Delightful Entertain- 
ment. 
Phone Kearny 18 2 Phone Kearny 3087 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



BANK OF 
NEW SOUTH WALES 



{ESTABLISHED IS17) 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Reserve Liability 'of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets 3Clh 
Seplember. 1913 




. $17,500,000 

11,750,000 

. 17,500,000 

. $46.750,000 
$236,841,080.26 



J. RUSSELL FRENCH, General Manager 



tuff BRANCHES and \OENCIES in the Australia States. New Zealand, 
lii Papua (Now Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every 
description of Australian Banking Business. Wool and Produce Credits 
Arranged. 

Head Office: London off,ce: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 



s^V 



/ 



ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Paid-Up Capital **. 000.000 
Surplus and Ui.divi.1-1 Profits •> .600.000 
Total Rwonrcau ?1".« ■ " , >" 



f 



H 



I 



OFFICERS: 
HKRBKRT FLtlSH HACKER 
SIQ QREENEBAUM Chain 
WASHINGTON DODGE 
JOS. KlUKiLANDER 
C. F. HUNT 
R. A LTSCH l' L- 
C. R. PARKER A 

WM. H, BIGB 
H. CHOVNSKI 
Q. R. RURDICK 
A. L. UNGERMAN 



President 

rataa Of the Board 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

Cashier 

Assistant Catkin 

Assistant Cnhliior 

A tilt taut Cashier 

Assistant Cwhier 

Secretary 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



HIAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD Genenl Manager 

JOHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



ESTABLISHED 1(1*7 
Paid-up Capital $15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 13,500,000 

Aggregate Resource 260,000,000 



TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 

The new Travellers' Cheques recently issued by this Bank are a moat 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 



$10 



$20 



$50 



AND 



$100 



and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 

526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Membtr of the Associated Savings Banks of Sib Francisco 

The Following Branches lor RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY: 

MISSION BRANCH S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH S. W. Cor. Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH S. W. Cor, Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1914 

Assets $ 58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

OFFICE HOURS: Id o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock P. M.. except Saturdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 
For the 6 months ending June 30th, 1914, a 
dividend to depositors of 4% per annum was declared. 



Telepliona Kearny U6i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Railroads 

Main Office: 62S-647 Third Street. San Francisco, Cal. 




THE ARSON SQUAD 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

DURING 

Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 



CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



Plan to Spend Your Vacation in 

YOSEM ITE VALLEY 



THIS YEAR 



It costs no more than many a common- 
place resort. In Yosemite there is nothing 
common. There is plenty to do and see, and 
rest and recreation not found elsewhere. 

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE IN THE PARK 

Auto stages will carry the visitor between 
railroad terminus and Yosemite this season, 
one of the finest auto trips in the world, 
without extra cost. 

ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER 
There are hotels, boarding camps, private 

camping — your choice at reasonable rates. 
For further information and rates, see any 

ticket agent, or address, 



YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 




HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Very Attractive Summer Rates 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Popular Prices 

Under Management of Victor Reiter 



ALP 



- AIS 

CALIFORNIA vs. SWITZERLAND 

WE HAVE THE ALPS RIGHT HERE 

Mt. Tamalpais and Mulr Woods 



The Recreation 

and Play Grounds 

of San Francisco 



FARE 
EITHER TRIP 

$1.90 



Via Sausallto Ferry 

Foot of 

Market Street 



$7 ROUND TRIP TO 

Anderson Springs 

By Writing to 
ROSE E. ANDERSON 



Anderson's Springs 



Lake County, Cat 



Rendezvous of Automobilists 
HOTEL OCCIDENTAL 

SANTA ROSA 

Rates, European Plan, $1.00 per day and up. 

Garage in Connection 



Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 
Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



Ji Quiet Hotel of Unusual Excellence 

Bellevue Hotel 

Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters (^specially to Luncheons ana Banquets 

H. W. WILLS, Manager 



THE GABLE S HOTEL 

Open as Usual 

Rates $9.00 up. Near Boyes Springs, 
Verano Station, N. W. P. R. R. Address 

H. P. MATHEWSON 

SONOMA CITY, CALIFORNIA 



i 



HOTEL 

POWHATAN 

HOTEL OrAMERICAN IDLT^LS 

The Hotel Powhatan is the 

best, at the same time the new- 
est, hotel in Washington. 

Famous Pennsylvania Avenue, 
at the junction of 18th and H 
Streets, affords the site for this 
most luxurious and modern ho> 
teL 

Write for booklet with map". 
CLIFFORD M. LEWIS, Minigir 



llli|||||||||||IHIIIIIIIiimmiml3 



AT THE HOME, CLUB, CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

ALWAYS SATISFACTORY 

Geo. W. Caswell Co. 

530-534 Folsom St. San Francisco 




E.l*Wl4h4d July »0. IU4 



ITER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 





Vol. LXXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 18, 1914 



No. 3 






The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Geo. Hische, 1310 Westminster, Westminster Building, 
Chicago. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll, E. C, England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, M-00; 6 months, J2.2B. 
Foreign — 1 year, J6.00; 6 months, J3.26. 



Alameda has employed a tree doctor. 

Registration for the August primary closes July 25th. 

Now comes the twinkle waltz, the contra temps and the 

kiss waltz. 

Sonoma had better look out. Alameda County is trying 

to steal Luther Burbank. 

The assessment roll for the city of Oakland foots up 

$157,454,110, an increase of more than $4,000,000 in one year. 

A headline reads "Upton Sinclair Refused to Eat." Too 

bad! But after two days of hunger strike he weakened and 
quit. 

W. G. Higgins, of Berkeley, missed the last boat and 

went to sleep in the ferry house. When he awoke, he missed 
his watch and money besides. 

"Dancers are born, not made," says Madame La Gai, 

who is teaching the University summer school how to trip the 
light fantastic toe. Wherefore La Gai then? 

Villa's education continues. First, General Scott made 

him a present of the articles of war, and now he has bought 
a bathtub. At this rate, he may yet be a saint. 

While some say the Wilson administration is responsible 

for the Claflin failure, others say it was caused by women's 
non-use of petticoats. So if it wasn't the Democrats, it was the 
women. 

Jeff Davis, King of the Hoboes, is on his way to visit 

us. "A hobo is a man who can and will work," he says. "A 
tramp is a man who can work, but won't, while a bum neither 
can nor will work." 

Reno has reformed under compulsion. It is no more the 

center of the divorce industry, and the clatter of the red and 
blue chips is heard no more behind the scene. Virtue is her 
own reward, but she seldom gets any other. 

Hugh Craig, formerly Mayor of Piedmont, has some 

radical ideas on the subject of taxation, and he says: "I hold 
that personal property is valueless. For instance, you buy a 
suit of clothes, and as soon as you wear it, it loses its value. 
The same applies of houses, which depreciate, trees which age; 
but the land increases always in value as the population comes." 



George D. Leslie, who eats figures for the commonwealth 

of California, reports that every twelve minutes during the 
year 1913 there was a birth, every fourteen minutes a death, 
and every seventeen minutes a marriage in California, and still 
we are not happy. 

Sanitary Inspector Ross, employed by the State Board 

of Health, complains that serving finger bowls from one per- 
son to another without cleansing them is dangerous to public 
health, and might be the means, declares Ross, of spreading 
disease at an alarming rate. 

A startling headline in the San Mateo Leader intro- 
ducing a Hillsboro story reads "Hush! Society Man, Maid and 
Matron Go Swimming Minus Regulation Bathing Suits." False 
alarm! The society etceteras did not swim in the altogether, 
but wore their normal garments, which only approximate. 

The historian of the recent Welsh-Ritchie prizefight in 

London tells us that one feature of the evening was the extra- 
ordinary number of women present. Most of the men who sat 
about the ringside were in evening dress, a custom adopted from 
the recent bouts in Paris. Altogether it was quite a society 
event. 

Los Angeles will have a queen to welcome visitors who 

come to California next year to see the world's fair. We 
are long on queens. Every interior town in the State raises 
them in bunches and flocks. They come not in single queens 
but in battalions. The queen is a village habit, and this is a 
republic of snobs. 

— —Franklin K. Lane, secretary of the interior, gains in 
legal prestige because, as interstate commerce commissioner, 
he prepared the decisions in all the great rate cases which 
have been sustained by the United States Supreme Court. 
They are now talking of him in Washington as a probable 
nominee for the United States Supreme Court bench when the 
next vacancy occurs. 

A society event reported in the Fresno Republican tells 

how Joe Connor, floor manager, started in to enforce the rag 
dancing ordinance on the Hamilton boy. Hamilton avers that 
Connor caught him roughly by the shoulder, struck him four 
times in the face, dragged him from the hall, and knocked him 
down, the last blow inflicting a deep gash over the right eye. 
The affair appears to have been strictly informal. 

The Sacramento Republican County Committee an- 
nounces that a political blacklist will be instituted to include 
the names of Progressive candidates who seek Republican 
nominations. A majority of the Republican newspapers of the 
State will run the list daily. The attack is directly aimed at 
Controller John S. Chambers, John Eshleman, candidate fo»- 
Lieutenant-Governor, and State Printer Friend Richardson, 
seeking the place of State Treasurer. 




WDYTORmL COMME 



i 




Shortridge Widely 
Endorsed. 



Samuel M. Shortridge, candidate 
for United States Senator from 
California, and seeking the Repub- 
lican party nomination for that of- 
fice, is getting a vigorous support from almost every quarter of 
the State. The newspapers of the interior are almost a unit 
in his support, and everywhere he is developing remarkable 
strength. His election looks like a landslide. As an example 
of the sort of endorsement that Mr. Shortridge is receiving, we 
quote an editorial from the Byron Times : 

"In approving the candidacy of Samuel M. Shortridge 
for the United States Senate, the editor of the Byron Times 
is guided by something more than friendship. For thirty 
years the editor of this paper has known Mr. Shortridge — 
as boy anu man. He had no better opportunities than the 
average youth, but by application and study, urged by an 
ambition to make something of himself, Mr. Shortridge 
has become a man among men. His has been a clean and 
honorable life. He has the love of his thousands of 
friends, the respect of his enemies (every man who does 
things has a few), and the good wishes of a legion who 
have heard his voice from the platform and who have 
known him by reputation. The Times believes Mr. Short- 
ridge is the man the State needs at Washington. He will 
require no introduction in the halls of Congress. He is 
known there already, and he will be welcomed as intelli- 
gence and ability are always welcomed." 

Similar endorsements given by newspapers in every part of 
California might be multiplied were it necessary. But Mr. 
Shortridge is so well known throughout the State that cumula- 
tion of testimony is quite superfluous. 

Mr. Shortridge is a man of the people, and everybody knows 
where he stands. He began life as a miner. He worked with 
his hands and he worked well, doing a man's work every work- 
ing day. With his ambitions and his mental capacity he could 
hardly be expected to continue a life of bodily toil. He ac- 
quired an education when it was not so easily obtained as now, 
was graduated with highest honors, successively became a 
teacher and a lawyer, always with that success which marked 
his every undertaking. 

When his ability as an orator became manifest, he was often 
called upon to speak at Republican gatherings, until he was 
known as the "Henry Clay of the Pacific Coast." He first 
took the stump for James G. Blaine in 1884. One of his ad- 
dresses, delivered before the State Republican Convention at 
Santa Cruz, in 1900, covered every issue so forcibly and logi- 
cally that it was distributed throughout the State as a cam- 
paign document. Further than being chosen as a Presidential 
elector from California in 1888, 1900 and again in 1908, re- 
ceiving in 1900 more votes than were ever cast for a candidate 
in California, he has never sought office. Mr. Shortridge is 
well acquainted with the needs of the State. He has made a 
special study of its educational system, has first hand knowl- 
edge of its important industries, and there is probably no bet- 
ter posted man in the country on tariff problems. 

3B- 

Sawdust and the waste products of 
Use for.By-Products lumbering have always been the 
Of Lumbering. despair of lumbermen. These by- 

products were not only in the way, 
but they were an imminent source of danger. Now it appears 
that the ingenuity of British Columbia lumbermen has discov- 
ered a way to utilize what hitherto has been wasted. A consu- 
lar report describes a briquet factory in Vancouver, B. C, and 
another in Victoria, where the bark, slabs, shavings, sawdust 
and other portions of the wood refuse from the sawmill is first 



passed through a "hog," or edging machine, in which it is cut 
into pieces not more than three-fourths inch long. The mater- 
ial is then passed into a shredder, where it is reduced to fine 
particles from the thickness of a match up to a quarter of an 
inch. From the shredder it passes into a dry kiln, where it is 
thoroughly dried, as green particles of wood will not adhere 
and remain in form, no matter how great the pressure may be. 
From the drier it goes to the heavy compress machine, where 
it is pressed into briquets, or rolls, three inches in diameter, 
held together with a seven-ply tarred jute string, the only bond 
used in the briquets. 

The cost of production, including depreciation, interest on 
capital, insurance, etc.. is estimated at $3 per cental. The sell- 
ing price will be governed by the price of coal, as the new 
fuel will be a competitor of coal for domestic uses. The 
manufacturers claim that the briquet as a grate fuel and for 
cooking purposes, especially for baking, are superior to either 
wood or coals, as it is more combustible than the latter and 
leaves less ash and residue than either. 

W 

The prevalence of the tuber moth 
Threatens the ' in the delta region of the California 

Potato Crop. rivers is a grave menace to the 

prosperity of the potato growers of 
that fertile region, and the pest has gained so much foothold 
that measures are about to be instituted to begin a scientific 
campaign to eradicate the evil. Modern agriculture has the 
fullest confidence in the efficacy of science to deal with in- 
sect pests. Accordingly, A. J. Cook, State Horticultural Com- 
missioner, has called a convention to meet in Stockton in Sep- 
tember, in accordance with a suggestion of the United States 
Department of Agriculture. Commissioner Cook describes 
the situation with which the growers are confronted, and he 
says "the tuber moth is a damaging pest of the potato. The 
caterpillar not only ruins the infested tuber, but may be car- 
ried in it wherever the tuber may go, and so is a menace ever 
and always." It is clear then that a State or region free of 
the pest is warranted in taking stringent measures to remain 
free. This necessitates action to refrain from all importation 
of affected tubers. There are only two ways to insure this 
imperative necessity: Either the shipper must inspect so care- 
fully and weed out so rigorously that no infected potatoes are 
shipped, or else all growers in moth-free sections must declare 
and enforce a strict quarantine. As we have not exercised 
the needed caution in making shipments, British Columbia, 
Idaho and Colorado, actually, and Oregon and Washington, 
practically, have resorted to the quarantine. Other States are 
likely to follow if we are not aroused to immediate and effective 
action. The magnitude of our potato interest is large, and the 
injury to our growers and shippers of this embargo is great. 
"Unfortunately, this moth is widely distributed throughout 
our State, though many sections, possibly whole counties, are 
free of attack." 

The potato growers do wisely to call in the aid of science 
and do it openly. Nothing is gained by concealment in such 
matters, as San Francisco learned when the city was threat- 
ened by the bubonic plague. We thought at first to meet that 
emergency by pretending that it did not exist. That only re- 
sulted in exaggerated and damaging reports from outside. 
When we started in openly and boldly to institute preventive 
measures, it did not take long to eliminate all danger. Now 
the potato growers propose to follow our example in their 
own special field. 



c 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Some of Rovcell's 
Notions. 



In a signed article printed by the 
California Outlook, the official or- 
gan of the Progressive party, Ches- 
ter H. Rowell defends the practice 
of seeking double nominations or "cross nominations," as he 
calls them, and he says : 

"There never was any reason, except the desire of politi- 
cal lawmakers to substitute their own notions for the will 
of the people, why any restrictions should have been 
placed on party voters to limit their choice of nominees. 
If the majority of the Republican voters at any primary 
desire to give some Democrat the Republican nomination, 
whose business is it but theirs whether they do it or not?" 

Mr. Rowell completely mistakes or ignores the point. No- 
body has contended that voters are precluded by law or other- 
wise from voting for whom they please. The true objection 
to this practice lies in its implication that parties mean noth- 
ing and stand for nothing. If there is any sense in the par- 
tisan alignment of Republicans, Democrats and Progressives 
these bodies must be supposed to stand for something definite 
in the way of principle. One observes with a sense of expec- 
tation fulfilled that Mr. Rowell makes a slighting reference to 
political principles when he describes them as "notions," as 
if they might be some sort of crazy maggot in the brain. 

This, of course, is the professional politician's view of the 
situation. Politics in his view is simply a game of grab, un- 
disguised office seeking in all nakedness and wholly divorced 
from principle. 

Now if a man submit himself as a candidate for the suf- 
frages of a given party, if he is sincere, he must accept the 
principles and platform of that party. But Rowell contends 
that he can stand on one, two or three platforms at once if that 
will help him to get office. 

Of course, Mr. Rowell does not attach much importance to 
platforms. We have his own testimony to the fact that he has 
himself drawn many of these documents, and no doubt custom 
stales their significance. Just "notions," quotha. 

What, then, is the meaning of Hiram Johnson tub-thumping 
all over California? Does it mean nothing more than that he 
wants an office, Has he any "notions" that distinguish him 
from plain Republicans or Democrats? Apparently Mr. 
Rowell thinks not, and the campaign means no more than : 
Give me office, for I need it in my business. This is Rowell's 
"notion" of the campaign, and it is always the notion of the 
professional politician. 

w 

Dr. V. C. Vaughan, president of the 
American Medical Association, who 
was called to California to investi- 
gate the merits of the proposal to 
amalgamate the medical schools of Stanford and the Univer- 
sity of California, gives his verdict against that project. When 
the matter was first mooted some time ago, it was thought wise 
to join the two schools, so that but one set of laboratories should 
be used, one set of instructors need be employed, and a great 
cutting of expenses be made, so as to increase the efficiency 
of equipment. The trustees also made an investigation and 
decided to keep the school in its existing condition. The de- 
cision was reached before Dr. Vaughan made his report. 

Dr. Vaughan pays a high tribute to the quality of medical 
and other scientific work done at Stanford, and as regards 
the question of the economies that would follow amalgamation 
he says that if the Stanford "medical school should be closed 
this would relieve Stanford of only one of the laboratories at 
Palo Alto. Physics, chemistry, biology, physiology, histology, 
embryology, neurology and bacteriology must be taught and 
research work in these branches must be done in a university 



No Amalgamation 
Of Medical Schools. 



of the high rank Stanford holds. Closing the medical school 
would give only trifling financial relief to the university. I 
therefore recommend that the premedical and medical work 
now done at Palo Alto be not noly continued but be developed 
as fast as the finances of the university permit. I make this 
recommendation not only for the good of the medical school, 
but, as I believe, in the interests of the university as a whole. 
If the medical department should be discontinued, anatomy 
is the only subject which could be dropped at Palo Alto, and 
even this should not be done. Anatomy is one of the great 
and fundamental biological sciences, and even human anatomy 
should be taught in a great scientific university. Anatomy is 
no longer taught as a mere foundation for medicine and sur- 
gery. It includes the development of structure from the low- 
est to the highest forms of life." 

Dr. Vaughan pays a high tribute to the quality of the equip- 
ment of the Stanford medical school. Its library is one of the 
best in the country, and the hospital is admirably managed. 



58th Anniversary of 
The News Letter. 



This is the 58th anniversary of the 
San Francisco News Letter and 
California Advertiser. Founded in 
the Vigilante period of 1856, it has 
survived almost all its contemporaries of that date. The early 
history of the paper is identified with Frederick Marriott, the 
elder, its founder. In those days, Ambrose Bierce, the great 
satirist, was beginning his literary career, and much of his best 
work may be found in the early files of this publication. 

Among the brightest and most able of the men who made the 
paper in those days was Kirk Ward, a brilliant and erratic 
writer. After him in the editor's chair came Ashton Stevens, 
who since has made a national reputation as a dramatic critic. 
Wallace Irwin, who has since made good as a contributor to 
Collier's Weekly, Life and other Eastern publications, followed 
Stevens. W. J. Weymouth, a well known journalist of this 
city, and Austin Lewis, the poet socialist, followed in their or- 
der, and were succeeded by Arthur Dutton, formerly of the 
United States Navy, who acted as editor until he took a posi- 
tion on the Chronicle. He was succeeded by Thomas B. Wil- 
son, an accomplished journalist. Pierre N. Beringer, formerly 
war correspondent for the New York Herald, was editor of the 
News Letter during the period of the great fire of 1906 and 
the reconstruction of the city. 

George Sontag, former member of the Evans-Sontag 

band of train robbers, is traveling the State delivering lectures 
on crime and criminals, and the Santa Cruz News asks will 
somebody please tell us why this desperado's life sentence was 
commuted to twenty-five years? Will somebody please tell us 
why, after having served a portion of that term, this desperado 
was paroled ? Will somebody please tell us why, after he was 
liberated on parole, Sontag was granted a full pardon? Was 
he a "model prisoner?" No; he was an exceptionally bad 
prisoner. Did he observe the prison rules? No; he broke 
them; defied the prison authorities and took up arms against 
them. 

XT 

The manufacturers and business men of Stockton, to 

the number of three hundred, have banded together to resist 
boycotts, picketing and the usual menacing and provoking 
conditions forced upon them by the walking delegate and agi- 
tators. Stockton has been alive with such troubles during the 
past seven years, and the result is that the business men have 
gotten together and ordered an "open shop" city. Hundreds of 
men have thrown down their tools and walked out, but the em- 
ployers say they have had no difficulty in filling their places. 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Politics Like Poker is not a Gentleman's Game- The Heney-Rowell Split in the Progres 

sive Party — A Dirty Business — Playing Cuckoo Once Again — State Civil Service 

Commission Passes the Buck — The Quarrel with Roberts 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



The Senatorial fight in the Progressive Party between 
Heney and Rowell promises to promote the gayety of the com- 
monwealth after the fun gets fairly started. Already Meyer 
Lissner has been heard to complain of the real or supposed 
perfidy of E. T. Earl, the Los Angeles millionaire newspaper 
publisher, whose organs are the most aggressive advocates of 
the "cause" in California. Lissner complains loudly that 
Rowell gets no show at all in Earl's newspapers, and alto- 
gether it's a dirned shame. While Rowell is stumping up and 
down the State making a polyglot campaign, addressing the 
Armenians of Fresno in their own tongue, and the Italians 
of North Beach in their language — while Rowell, I say, is do- 
ing linguistic stunts in the way of all things to all men, he is 
made to suffer in the cold shade of Earl's neglect, and gets 
nary a line in the Los Angeles Tribune or Express. It is dis- 
gusting treachery, says Lissner. The way of the progressor 
is hard. 

Of course, as might have been expected, the progressive 
party is split wide open on this nomination. Governor Johnson, 
Meyer Lissner and Rowell lead one faction, while Francis J. 
Heney, Representative Kent and E. T. Earl head the other. 
There is good fighting material on both sides, and we need not 
be surprised shortly to hear them calling each other "conspira- 
tors" — the politicians' pet name for the fellow on the other 
side. 

B 5 B 

The Jane Addams Incident. 

Then again there was the Jane Addams episode, which is re- 
viewed by Brother Mappes in the Fresno Mirror, where he 
pays his respects to his neighbor and tells us how Senatorial 
candidate Heney recently sent to the press of the State copies 
of an endorsement of his candidacy from Jane Addams of 
Hull House, Chicago. Senatorial candidate Rowell was peeved 
thereat — more than peeved, in fact he was consternated; and 
the manager of his press bureau in San Francisco was directed 
to send a protest to Jane. Answering the protest, Jane said 
that her statement was in no sense an indorsement of one can- 
didate as against another, but merely an expression of her 
personal knowledge of Mr. Heney's character and ability. 

Of course, that is all it was, and we cannot understand why 
Candidate Rowell should have objected to such an expression 
of opinion. Unless we are badly mistaken, an examination of 
the files of the Republican would reveal that when Candidate 
Rowell was Editor Rowell he referred to Miss Addams as an 
"intellectual anarchist" — or was it simply as an anarchist? Why 
one should care whom any kind of an anarchist indorses we 
do not understand. Besides, what is it to the ordinary voter of 
this State what Jane Addams thinks of California candidates. 
Her knowledge of political conditions out here can have been 
gained only by hearsay, and as she moves in a "progressive" 
sphere her knowledge must be one-sided. 

From Miss Addams explanatory letter to Candidate Rowell's 
publicity manager, it appears that the latter sent her a bio- 
graphy of Mr. Rowell. We wonder if there was any mention 
in it of Mr. Rowell's persistent quest of office for which he 
deemed himself specially qualified by a man whom he regarded 
as totally unfit? 



McClatchy Stings. 

Then comes McClatchy of the Sacramento Bee, another 
pillar of the progressive "cause," who prints these unkind 
remarks about Rowell : 

"Chester Rowell ever was a man of convictions, and not 
afraid to express them. But now that he is an aspirant 
for the Republican nomination for United States Senator, 
he finds it not inconvenient to devote the editorial columns 
of the Fresno Republican to such innocently harmless 
topics as 'Adventure,' 'Attack on Dress,' and 'Hidden 
Gold.' " 

S 5 » 

Not a Gentleman's Game. 

It's a pretty how-dye-do when political brethren cannot 
dwell together in peace, and instead of flourishing the sword 
of the Lord and Gideon in the face of the enemy, are slyly 
sticking knives in the backs of the elect like the Scriptural 
character who inquired, "Art thou in health, my brother?" and 
iorthwith smote him under the fifth rib. 

Politics is like poker. It is not a gentleman's game. The 
best player is the most successful trickster. The Progressives 
pose as custodians of all the virtues, and they illustrated this 
pose by stealing the Republican place on the ballot at the last 
National election. Now they are again scheming for double 
barreled nominations, and they are not at all particular, being 
quite willing to play cuckoo in either the Republican or the 
Democratic nest, as may suit their books. I was amused the 
other day by reading a set of "ringing" resolutions adopted by 
the Sacramento Democratic County Committee, which says 
concerning this practice: 

"Whereas, It is currently reported that certain candidates for 
office claiming to be Progressive have in addition to circulating 
Progressive petitions for nomination sought to secure also a 
place upon the official ballot as Democrats ; and 

"Whereas, such conduct is a flagrant violation of the spirit, 
if not the letter, of the State primary act, is unfair to Demo- 
crats who in good faith seek a party nomination, and is a 
wicked attempt to deceive the voters and to secure support 
where none is due, and 

"Whereas, Such efforts, whether successful or unsuccessful, 
bring discredit not only upon the men who make them, but 
also the various political parties affected and the whole scheme 
of independent action by the voters, 

"Therefore be it resolved, by the County Central Committee 
of the Democratic party of Sacramento County, that it hereby 
denounces such attempts to secure by such unfair means any 
aid from Democrats or the Democratic party to any candidate 
for office as improper and indecent, and we call upon all Demo- 
crats who believe in the principles or revere the history of 
their party to refuse any and all requests for such an unholy 
coalition and to sign only the nomination blanks of and vote for 
only the men known to be Democrats." 

S S S 
Why Waste Language? 

In the name of the great God Bunk, what's the use? Why 
waste all this fine language and these scorching adjectives? 
They are all true but they will not make the smallest difference. 
The same things and worse were said of the Progressives 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



when they stole the Republican place on the ballot in 1912, and 
it made no difference. The amusing phase of the episode of 
that time was that Chester Rowell, with solemn and laborious 
sophistry took pains to defend the course of the tricksters. 

Now comes Frank Jordan, Secretary of State, and like the 
Democrats, complains that the Progressives are playing cuckoo 
with the Republicans. He calls them "interlopers and bo- 
hunks." It is a sad tale, mates, of a new hand teaching an old 
dog tricks. Already "the spirit of the direct primary" is a 
shivering ghost. 

5 0" S 
A Robbing Game. 

It is a dirty business all round, and this explains the low 
estimation in which politicians are held. The prime object of 
politics as it is waged is to gain some special privilege or some 
unfair advantage. Consider the tariff, for example, and you 
might instructively read what Brother Hulaniski has to say 
on the subject in his address to the Petalumans, to wit: 

"Petaluma is crying its head off over the taking off of the 
five cents tariff on eggs, and wants it put back on again before 
it is ruined entirely because some other country may ship in a 
few eggs. We will have to take the same position on this as 
on the sugar beets and a few other things. There are hun- 
dreds of thousands of consumers to one producer of sugar 
beets, or eggs either, and just why a hundred thousand people 
should be mulcted for the benefit of one person is not apparent. 
Any time it don't pay to lay eggs, don't lay 'em. Lay some- 
thing else. Lay anything, except to lay down, and above 
everything else, quit doing the baby act and clamoring for a 
paternal government to be everlastingly holding a nursing bot- 
tle to your wide open mouth. Petaluma never did supply half 
the California demand for eggs. Millions of dozens are 
shipped in here from Kansas and other States every year. Pro- 
tect the producer to a reasonable extent, but for the love of 
Mike give the consumer something other than continued swats." 

S 3f ■» 
Passing the Buck. 

The case of Thomas J. McLaughlin, a printer discharged 
from the State Printing office, may serve to throw some light 
on the way of politics in the State house. McLaughlin was 
discharged by State Printer Richardson on the stated ground of 
inefficiency, and thereupon a committee of the Typographical 
Union waited on Richardson, demanding McLaughlin's rein- 
statement. Richardson refused, and thereupon the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission was consulted and transferred the committee 
to Governor Johnson. Chairman Howe and his men were taken 
in charge by the Governor's private secretary, Alexander Mc- 
Cabe, who listened to the protest and the prayer for reinstate- 
ment of McLaughlin. The matter was shelved by the Gov- 
ernor's office, but is not final, according to members of the 
committee, who state that unless the claims of McLaughlin are 
given consideration, other means will be taken to force the 
issue. 

The incident is instructive for the light it throws on the value 
and uses of the State Civil Service Commission. In a matter 
of this kind, the commission has autocratic powers to deal 
with the matter, but as in every other instance where politics 
is involved, it promptly passes the buck. The commission is 
the scared rabbit of politics forever hunting its hole. See the 
scut of it dodging around a hot corner. 

I have heretofore referred to the State civil service law as 
"a piece of political bunk," and this McLaughlin incident 
proves the case. The civil service commission dares not act 
as the law directs until it gets orders from Hiram Johnson or 
Aleck McCabe. That is to say, Johnson is the law, and Mc- 
Cabe is his prophet. When in the days of its youth," this com- 



mission went up against State Treasurer Roberts, that stout 
official flouted the order. Then the commission, afraid of its 
own powers, appealed to Governor Johnson, and they were told 
to quit, because at that time Johnson needed Roberts in his 
business, or thought he did, and thereby hangs a tale. 

» S V 
The Quarrel With Roberts. 

Since that time, Roberts and the Governor have quarreled, 
and the Treasurer says that Johnson was a party to the double 
crossing scheme engineered by Lieutenant-Governor Wallace, 
Meyer Lissner and Ed. Nixon, all Southern California Pro- 
gressives, whereby John Eshleman was substituted for him as 
a candidate for Lieutenant-Governor. 

"Governor Johnson called me into his office, asked me if I 
wanted to be lieutenant-governor, and exacted a promise from 
me to sit tight and not make any announcement. Then Eshle- 
man was put into the fight with the Southern California en- 
dorsements," said Roberts. 

"I want you to do me a favor and wait before you do any- 
thing," Roberts said Johnson made him promise when it was 
current talk that the State Treasurer would be a candidate 
for the lieutenant-governorship. 

A few days after this, Roberts said he received a telegram 
from the Progressive Committee in the South asking him to 
defer announcement on his candidacy. 

"That day, Jack Neylan of the control board came into my 
office, and I showed him the telegram. The next day Johnson 
called me into his office again. 'Didn't you promise me you 
would sit tight?' Roberts said Johnson asked. T did and I am,' 
Roberts replied. 

While Roberts was "sitting tight" Wallace and the Los 
Angeles committee rushed through John Eshleman's indorse- 
ment. "I told Johnson no man could tell me what I should 
do and that I would go to the people. I urged Johnson to run 
as a Progressive Republican, but he wouldn't answer me. When 
any one differs with him he is generally non-committal." 

Of course, all this is denied, and a truce has Deen patched 
up, but there is no doubt that Roberts was hot in the collar 
at the way he was thrown down. Now he is out of politics, 
and has decided to quit the whole dirty business as something 
unfit for a gentleman to mix or meddle with at all. 



The "Emporium" handles "Old Forester" whisky. Sold 

in glass only. Direct from distillery to you. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



CHAMPAGNE 



PIPER-HEIDSIECK 

Anc n - e M°. n HEIDSIECK fondee en 1785 
KUNKELMANN&C?Succ r . 8 

REIMS 



Charles Meinecke &, Co. 



Iiinti P«cmc CO»»T 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. r 



)an 



■ rancisco INews 



Ne 



Letter 



July 18, 1914 




Oakdale, in Stanislaus County, has installed a municipal 

swimming pool, and at the same time has enacted an ordinance 
that everybody must take a bath before going in to swim. If 
this law seems to imply a libel on the cleanliness of the Oak- 
dalers, it may be observed that the town is one of the best 
regulated municipal families. The Marshal is instructed to 
arrest any person, man, woman or child who appears on the 
street in swimming costume. The pool is patronized daily by 
hundreds of swimmers, and the new rule requiring a bath is be- 
ing rigidly enforced. Orders have also been issued prohibiting 
the use of profane language or offensive slang, so that the pool 
has become very popular with the women folks. 

1. E. Levy, a big apricot grower of Cupertino, in the 

Santa Clara Valley, is a melancholy philosopher, and he says : 
"The general tendency of the times as exemplified in the so- 
called rag dances has caused a shift in many industries not 
directly connected with the dances themselves. Millions of 
dollars have been lost in industries just because of a slight 
change in public inclination. The sale of apricots has suffered. 
People think more nowadays of bunny-hugging and one-step- 
ping than they do of eating good, wholesome pastry. The young 
beaux of to-day take their girls to a 'rag' dance instead of 
standing treat for some pie, as the gallants of a few years ago 
would have done." 

Professor Waterman, of the Department of Anthropology 

in the University of California, has been explaining the psy- 
chology of the savage for the edification of summer school 
students, using the university's pet Indian, Ishi, the last of 
the Yanas, for illustration: "At the great modern inventions, 
such as the automobile and the aeroplane, he did not show 
unusual surprise," explained Professor Waterman. "He seemed 
to think the white man could do anything. However, he 
seemed astonished at many little things. The rolling of a 
window curtain interested him greatly. After pulling the string 
he would gaze wonderingly at the place where the curtain had 
gone." 

Oroville is getting jealous of its neighbors. Red Bluff 

and Chico, whose ready ingenuity has put on sale a line of 
boiled rocks and other by-products of supposed volcanic ori- 
gin, makes the Mercury remark: "Redding and Red Bluff are 
getting a great deal of valuable advertising from Mount Lassen. 
Our local press correspondents should not be so modest. They 
should use the Oroville date line oftener and incidentally men- 
tion the fact that we have a fine mountain road leading there 
via Quincy, Plumas County. We should have our share of this 
travel, but if we do not shout our own praises we will not get 
it." 

President Sproule of the Southern Pacific says the com- 
pany will spend no more money to control floods in the Colo- 
rado. "We have reached our limit," he said. "We have already 
expended $3,500,000 on that river, and we are a transportation 
company, not engaged in the business of controlling rivers. 
The work is too great for a single corporation to handle it." 
It may be added that most of the money spent by the railroad 
company in this relation was expended at the urgent solicita- 
tion of President Roosevelt, under pledge that Congress would 
reimburse the cost. That pledge has not been fulfilled. 



Perhaps you have forgotten General Kelley, who pro- 
fessed to command the army of the unemployed last winter in 
this city. The remnant of that army stole quietly into Wash- 
ington on July 4th, and marched to the Capitol, and, on the 
steps of the main entrance, held sway for fifteen minutes be- 
fore being detected by the police. Permission to speak from 
the steps of the Capitol had been refused by Vice-president 
Marshall, but with Congress not in session and few people 
about, "Colonel" Charles McLennan, commanding officer, be- 
lieved it a good time to steal a march on Congress. He suc- 
ceeded, only to be interrupted during his denunciation of the 
present form of government. "Colonel" McLellan was taken 
into custody, but was not locked up. His assurances that the 
army would retreat from the Capitol grounds gained him free- 
dom. 

■ The supervisors of Fresno County are debating whether 

to pay $6,211 to insure the county employees in the State com- 
pensation fund for one year or save that money to create an 
insurance fund of their own. Some of them favor a plan of 
the county itself insuring its employees by setting aside annu- 
ally an amount of money equal to the State premium. None 
of the overhead expenses will have to be paid, they argue, 
in view of the remote possibilities, gauged by the experiences 
of the past in being called upon to meet a compensation in- 
surance demand. Now, what are these "overhead expenses" 
that the insured must pay? Is the State engaged in the insur- 
ance business for profit? It has been a common remark that 
the Workmen's Compensation law was built around Deacon 
Pillsbury, disguised as overhead expenses. 

With Oakland dumping garbage on San Francisco's 

doorstep, the hired poet of the Tribune breaks into jeering 
verse like this : 

"If forty maids with forty brooms 
Should sweep for half a year, 
Do you suppose," the council said, 

"That they could get it clear?" 
"I doubt it," said the garbinger, 
And shed a bitter tear. 

Indeed, the garbage problem is a serious matter for the 

East bay cities. Berkeley is having all sorts of trouble because 
its official incinerator distributes loud and unassorted per- 
fumes perplexing unprotected noses. Richmond, like Oakland, 
purposes to float its refuse out to sea, so that the San Fran- 
cisco beach is likely to become a steady resort of tin cans and 
laundry bills. 

Ed. Leake, of Yolo, challenges Joe Knowland to name 

any California industry that has suffered by reason of the new 
tariff. Mr. Knowland, in his speech at Long Beach, did say 
the citrus fruit industry had been injured, and to this Leake 
replies that "the Chronicle has a special writer traveling over 
the State, who is exploiting the advantages, resources and crop 
conditions. In an article which appears on June 23d it is rep- 
resented that the citrus fruit industry in Tulare County is very 
prosperous and that the owners of citrus fruit orchards are 
reaping a rich reward." 

Lassen is as busy as a fiddler, and it is now throwing 

up quicksilver. It is related that a farmer living in the Hat 
Creek country, near the mountain, visited the creater when it 
was taking a rest, and he picked up a number of rocks which 
had been thrown out. These were sent to friends in Redding 
as souvenirs. It so happened that one of the rocks was seen 
by an old miner, and he ventured the guess that it was a speci- 
men of rich cinnabar ore. With due encouragement, the moun- 
tain should shortly be vomiting thermometers. 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 





* PL/EASURIy'S WAND 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

PAUL GERSON. 

The Orpheum. 

If you do not think pros- 
perity has at last returned, 
journey any evening to the 
Orpheum Theatre, and wit- 
ness the capacity crowds 
attending this popular 
house, and the general at- 
mosphere of happiness and 
satisfaction which per- 
vades the theatre. Witness 
last Monday evening, gen- 
erally considered the off- 
night of the week theatri- 
cally. The Orpheum was 
crowded to the very last 
row, not a single vacancy 
to be noted anywhere, and 
even the third tier of boxes 
which are located near the 
ceiling, were occupied. No, 
there was no unusual fea- 
ture to attract such a crowd. 
You can see the same thing 
any night you attend. An 
Orpheum program means 
the culling of the very best 
and most select features of 
the entire vaudeville world. 
Week in and week out, you 
are sure to see several num- 
bers which are out of the 
ordinary, and which are 
sure to olease vou, and you 
never hear of a regular Or- 
pheumite leaving the thea- 
tre unsatisfied. This is the 
secret of the phenomenal 
success of this house. The 
bill this week is splendid 
from beginning to end. 
Somebody has to open the 
show, and this duty is as- 
signed to Kramer and Mor- 
ton, the two black face 
comedians, who have been 
here before, and return with 
a lot of new jukes and 
songs. They came r.ear 
stopping the program at the 
very beginning, the people 
in front calling them back 
again and again. They 
score a big hit. Sammy 
Burns and Alice Fulton do 
a terpsichorean act which is 
remarkable even in these 

dance-mad days. They end Charlotte Tittell. one of the All-Star Players at the Columbia Theatre, offering for the fitth irepfc, 
with a whirlwind affair, beginning Monday, July 20th, "Fine Feathers." 
which rouses the audience 




to a high pitch of enthusiasm. Altogether they give an ex- 
hibition which is unusual in many ways. They certainly are 
a very large success. Yvette is another of those dancing vio- 
linists who manages to cavort around the stage while playing 
various numbers. This lady manages to do all kinds of stunts 
while eking out her melodies. She has a special setting, a 
shock of very red hair and nimble toes, as well as fingers. She 
sings passably well, too. The audience like her very much, 
which is evidenced by the number of encores she is obliged 
to respond to. Our old friend William Brady is taking a 



fling in vaudeville, and presents his first effort, a skit entitled 
"Beauty is only Skin Deep." The scene is a beauty parlor, 
and the incidents are humorous to a degree. Interwoven in the 
various episodes incidental to an establishment of this kind, 
there is a plot which is very interesting, the chief character 
being enacted by Jean Adair with a display of much cleverness 
and ability. There are nine women in the cast, and not a single 
representative of the sterner sex. Who was it stated that a play 
or sketch could not be written which contained real interest 
vithout a man? Go and see this effort of Elizabeth Jordan's, 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 



who has written an act which possesses both novelty 
and interest. Britt Wood is an unostentatious 
youth who scores one of the big hits of the evening 
with a fifty cent mouth harmonica as his "piece de 
resistance." He presents a number which is out of 
the ordinary, and the size of his hit may be judged 
when he had to be shifted from the opening num- 
ber to the best place on the programme. Britt must 
be seen and heard to be appreciated. Anna Held's 
daughter, grown up to womanhood, and giving her- 
self the name of Liane Carrere, presents herself in 
a singing and dancing act, supported by Tyler 
Brooke and a bevy of show girls. The fair daughter 
sings a song about having her mother's eyes, which 
is perfectly true, and she joins her associates in 
several numbers. The entire act is very entertain- 
ing, and the setting is very beautiful. _ Miss Car- 
rere is quite young, and without doubt is following 
closely in her distinguished mother's artistic foot- 
steps. John and Mae Burke present a melange of 
songs and piano playing, which makes a very large 
hit. John carries the burden of the act. M. Car- 
radini has a wonderful animal act, and introduces 
trained zebras, an educated elephant, a beautiful 
horse and trained dogs. It is a great act, an ade- 
quate finish to an all-round splendid bill. 



"Cabiria" at the Gaiety. 

America is the home and stamping ground of the 
moving picture art and industry, yet we are obliged 
to go abroad to find the perfection and last word 
in the film world. Italy has been showing us the 
way for some time, and "Cabiria" stands as the 
consummation and depiction of the great things 
which can be accomplished in the silent drama. 
Never in this country have we ever witnessed any- 
thing to equal it. In the matter of massive group- 
ings and scenes, and tremendous ensembles and 
light effects, the whole thing is simply marvelous. 
There are thousands of participants. In the con- 
struction of special scenery, it is hard to describe in 
mere words what these intrepid Italians have really 
done. It must be seen to be appreciated. Why in 
this country we cannot do what they have done 
over there is sometimes hard to understand. I put 
this question the other day to a moving picture expert, and he 
said it was lack of sincere co-operation among the American 
manufacturers. He stated that competition was so keen that 
commercialization takes the place of art. This is a pity. Ga- 
brielle D'Annunzio wrote the story for "Cabiria." A great 
deal of it is founded on actual occurrences in early history, 
and around this he has woven a story of earthquake and fire 
and battle. We see the trained legions tramping through the 
snow clad sides of the Alps, and later we witness others wend- 
ing their way over the trackless wastes of the Arabian 
deserts. 

There is nothing in the scope of human emotion and feel- 
ing which this picture does not show. It seems that the posi- 
tive limit has been reached by the producers in realism. To 
add to the artistic part of the whole, a chorus is provided, who 
sing appropriate music at the right time, and an orchestra of 
twenty-five pieces accompanies the progress of the story with 
music which is very descriptive and in keeping with the high 
standard set by the producers. That we are all keen to realize 
what we are being offered is in evidence any evening you wish 
to go to the Gaiety, and I would advise you to secure your seats 
well in advance. Wednesday evening when I attended there 
was a line before the box office almost a half block long, and 
many people were turned away. The audience at times fairly 
gasped with the immensity of it all. It was easily the very 
greatest film drama which had been brought to their notice. 
To see "Cabiria" makes one wonder what the limit of the film 
drama will be. Nothing seems impossible, and we can but 
wonder what the great film producers will next attempt. Don't 
fail to see "Cabiria." Words cannot describe it all. It is ab- 
solutely and indisputably the very last word in the entire world 
of moving pictures. 




Trixie Friganza, at the Orpheum next week. 

Alcazar. 

Bessie Barriscale was born to play Juanita, "The Rose of 
the Rancho." The part fits her to a dot, and she is always 
welcome. No, we do not call her an old favorite in this part, 
but_ rather a young and ever blooming favorite. In the present 
revival of Richard Walton Tully's romantic drama at the Al- 
cazar, she is ably supported by Thurston Hall. Moreover, the 
piece as a whole is admirably staged, and the settings are 
exquisitely beautiful and elaborate. When the curtain went 
up, Bert Wesner was disclosed in the brown frock and kindly 
white hair of good old Padre Antonio; Thurston Hall, as 
Kearny, the Yankee government agent, was waiting to stride 
into the Mission garden, and Howard Hickman, as the rival 
for Juanita, was enjoying dreams of manana and lying asleep 
on a bench. Then the gates opened and the Rose of the Ran- 
cho came in laughing, with a sash at her belt and a rose in 
her hair. 

Kernan Cripps as a land jumper, Adele Belgarde as the 
daughter of a proud Californian house of the old regime, all 
were cast for parts that suited well with their capabilities. 
* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Alcazar Theatre. — On Monday night, July 20th, the Alcazar 
Theatre management will offer for the first time in stock, and 
at popular prices, Alexander McHugh's screamingly funny 
farce-comedy success, "Officer 666," with Bessie Barriscale 
and Thurston Hall in the leading roles, supported by the full 
strength of the Alcazar players and several specially engaged 
thespians. This will mark the last, but one, week of the en- 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




Elissa, in "Cabiria," at the Gaiety. 

gagement of this popular pair of stars, who leave us to return 
to their work in New York productions. "Officer 666," under 
the management of Cohan & Harris, enjoyed a run of two 
solid years at the Gaiety Theatre, in New York, and is, at 
present, the reigning success at the Adelphi, in London. 

All the events are worked out with speed and precision dur- 
ing the three acts which the author takes to tell the story that 
is chock full of surprising situations, smart epigrams and very 
funny comedy chatter. 

• * * 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum headline attraction next week will 
be the famous Trixie Friganza, one of the most attractive, suc- 
cessful and popular comediennes of the day. 

Clark and Verdi, the Italian comedians, will portray a couple 
of their compatriots, one of whom has been in this country 
two years, while the other has only just arrived. 

Five Melody Maids and A Man will present a melange of 
mirth and melody. They play upon five pianos and sing de- 
lightfully. 

Ray Conlin, who styles himself "The Acme of Sub-Vocal 
Comedy," is a gifted ventriloquist who puts a clever line of 
comedy, chatter and song into his puppet partner. 

Next week will be the last of M. and Mme. Corradini's 
Menagerie; John and Mae Burke; Burns and Fulton and Liane 

Carrera, Anna Held's daughter. 

* » » 

Columbia. — "Fine Feathers," the greatest play from the 
pen of Eugene Walter, who has given the American stage such 
successes as "The Trail of the Lonesome Pine," "Paid in Full," 
and "The Easiest Way," has been selected as the bill for the 
fifth week of the current season of the All-Star Players at the 
Columbia Theatre, beginning Monday night, July 20th. There 
are three acts of tremendous situations, and they will be admir- 



ably played by the Ail-Star Players, including, among others, 
Charles Richman, Rose Coghlan, Gladys Hanson, Charles 
Cherry, Charlotte Tittell. Frank Kingdon, George Stuart Chris- 
tie and Horace Mitchell. There is an enormous demand for 
seats for this play, and the prospects are that it will crowd the 
house at all performances. Matinees will be given Wednesdays 
and Saturdays. 

* * * 

Gaiety.— Were it not that "Cabiria" has other importunate 
bookings, the great D'Annunzio photo-spectacle, with its sym- 
phony orchestra and grand opera chorus, might remain indefin- 
itely at the Gaiety Theatre, where every afternoon and every 
evening vast throngs repair to be thrilled by the mightiest 
photo-spectacle ever produced. Never has there been such a 
unanimity of opinion concerning a theatrical presentation as 
that which "Cabiria" has won, and never before has there been 
such a demand on the superlatives of language to express the 
admiration of the patrons of this epoch making spectacle. On 
leaving the theatre, one feels as though a part of ancient his- 
tory and a romance and conflict of ancient days had been lived 
over once more, and that the witness was a part of the thrilling 
narrative of bloody conflict and splendid victory. 

Vivian Grant's Musicale. 

Below will be found the unusually attractive program ar- 
ranged and given by Vivian Grant in Berkeley, presenting 
"Tannhauser" in music and pictures. These musicales are edu- 
cational and impressive. The program: 

Act 1, Scene 1 — Venusberg music, Bacchante's dance, piano; 
Chrous of the Sirens, violin and second piano heard in the dis- 
tance. Scene 2 — Venus and Tannhauser, sirens heard in the 
distance; Tannhauser's Song, "Stet sol nur dir," Venus and 
Tannhauser, violin. Scene 3 — Shepherd plays on his pipe: 
Song of the Shepherd, Chant of the Pilgrims, Tannhauser's 
Prayer, Chant of the Pilgrims; violin, organ, piano accompani- 
ment. Scene 4 — Wolfram's Songs, "Aio du in Runen Sanger;" 
violin solo on the G string, arranged by Vivian Grant; Tann- 
hauser's song, "Ha, jetzt erkenne ich sie wiede." Violin, with 
organ and piano. 

O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Phone Kearnj 2 

Weeb commencing Monday night. July 20th. Matinees Thursday, 
Saturday, Sunday. Last \vek. but one: BESSIE BARR1SCALE, 
THURSTON HAUL, with the Alcazar players in the screamiesl 
farce ever written, 

"OFFICER 666" 
Summer Prices — Nights. 25c 50c. 75c. Mats.. £5c, 35c, 50c 
A good orchestra seat at night for 50c 

O'Farrell. Opposite Orpheum 
Phone Sutter J 141 

A VERITABLE TRIUMPH. Gahrielc li'Annunzlo's masterwork, 
visualized In a stupendous photo-spectacle. 
CABIRIA. 
iO.OOO; discloses 7.000 people In Its gigantic episodes of the 
i Century B. C. 

^:15. Prices _'.">'.. SOc, 75c Matinees at 2:15. Prices 



Alcazar Theatre 



Gaiety Theatre 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street 



Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 



WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON. MATINEE 
EVERY DAY. 

SUPERB VAUDEVILLE, 

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BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

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12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 




Have you observed that ears are being worn again? It has 
all come about within a week or ten days. For years those 
appendages to the head were used entirely for utilitarian pur- 
poses. "Ears should be hearing, not seen," was a mandate 
which even the woman with shell pink ears obeyed as though it 
were a religious command. Large or small, flaring or shapely, 
thick or delicate, pinkly transparent or opaquely yellow, ears 
were consigned to a hiding place under varying arrangements 
of hair. At one period the hair was pompadoured over a "rat" 
and piled high on the head; the pompadour had a reef taken 
in its inches, and the knot moved to the middle apartment on 
the head; the "rats" came out altogether, and the knot moved 
down stairs; the hair was plastered to the head, and the ends 
flattened to the natural contour; the plastered effect remains, 
but an interrogation point is pinned over each ear, or pom- 
maded into place. 

Then the other day, as though by wave of a magic wand, the 
hair begins to lift upward. I saw it happen at the St. Francis. 
Mrs. Stuart Haldorn came in to luncheon with a group of 
friends. Immediately there was that indefinable fluttering in 
the air that means that the other women have been lifted out 
of the commonplaces of the usual luncheon conversation. A 
thrill undulates through the feminine contingent of the crowd. 
Even the middle-aged women find it impossible to give kindly, 
tolerant attention to what the escorts are saying. The men 
regard the women with amazement. "What in the deuce has 
happened?" asks Harry Scott, who is there with his fiancee, 
Mrs. Norma Preston Ames. "Enid Gregg is wearing her ears 
to-day," responds that witty lady, with laconic brevity. 

She has the shapely, tiny, pink, close-to-the-head ears. The 
other women unconsciously begin to feel their own ears. Sur- 
reptitiously, their hands steal up under the hair which has 
been carefully and closely plastered over their hearing appara- 
tus, and one can almost hear them think about how they will 
look with their ears exposed to the world. Pink, shell-like 
things are much more plentiful by the sands of the sea than on 
the heads of women. But that very afternoon, women with 
ears of undoubted usefulness, but dubious ornamentation, try 
out the new fashion. By four o'clock in the afternoon, sev- 
eral of the girls in a smart shop are wearing ears. I asked the 
manager about it. 

"We had advance notice of it," he said; "ears, tight hair, 
close fitting sleeves, snug tailor mades that go in at the waist 
line, are some of the things that they are going to try to put 
over this season. But you can't tell how those things will take. 
I didn't think that the designers could put the kimono sleeves 
out of business without a big protest from the consumers — of 
course,- as far as bringing out ears again" — and here he 
shrugged his shoulders — "that isn't so important, because they 
can go back again at a moment's notice, but if we bring out 
these new tailor-mades, and the women don't like them, where 
are we ? As for ears appearing so soon here — well, as I say, we 
had advance notice on them, but I told the girls to go slow. 
Then the other afternoon a couple of society women came in 
with the hair done the new way, so I told a few of the best 
lookers on the floor to go the limit on exposing the ear. We can 
not afford to be behind the styles on a thing like that!" 

Within twenty-four hours the town was full of ears. They 
could be seen not only in the cultured places where the broad 
"A" rounds pleasantly on the accustomed ear-drum, but also 
in places where it twangs nasally on that overworked organ. 
In the smart set, in the shop, in the office, in the factory, 
wherever there are women with an instinct for keeping in step 
with the style, the hair lifted upward, and ears came out of their 
stuffy hiding places under swathings of hair. 
© © © 

Up at Tahoe, society is humming the refrain of a tender little 
melody which Mrs. Gene Murphy wrote for the birthday cele- 
bration of her most intimate friend, Mrs. Fred Kohl. The 



words and music are both of Mrs. Murphy's inspiration, and 
have more than intimate merit— in fact, every one who has 
heard them insists that with a few changes in the personal 
words, the little song should be sent on its way for a birthday 
song for any one who loves to have that day set to the lilt of 
song. So it will follow that the song will be published. This 
is not the first time that a San Francisco society woman has 
published the work of her musing hours at the piano. Before 
her marriage, Miss Kathleen de Young had a very creditable 
book of songs brought out by a publisher, and the first song in 
the book, a dainty lullaby, dedicated to her niece, little Miss 
Patricia Tobin, has not been overlooked by the public. 

Mrs. Kohl is one of the few women of this day and gen- 
eration who recognizes a birthday as a joyous occasion for due 
celebration. Most of them believe that as part of the ritual of 
the unholy war against age one must say "thou shall not recog- 
nize thy natal day, neither this year nor in any of the years to 
follow." Women still in their early thirties, like Mrs. Kohl, 
are just as grim about it as those who can really see the enemy 
around the corner. Therefore, when a woman flouts this cult, 
and has a birthday party, she creates something of a sensa- 
tion. It is not regarded as quaint and old fashioned, but as a 
daring and defiant thing for even a young woman like Mrs. 
Kohl to do — it means that in the years to come she cannot 
stealthily amputate a few years from her calendar, for the cal- 
culating busybodies will let "X" equal the birthday party, and 
by simple algebra will compute her age to the end of her days. 

"Piffle," dimpled the lovely Mrs. Kohl, and in the face of 
all this went right on and had one of the loveliest birthday 
parties that ever shone by the light of the correct number of 
candles on a birthday cake. With Frank Michaels bursting 
into poetry for the occasion, and Mrs. Murphy into song, is it 
any wonder that "The Lady of the Lake," as the poet called 
her, is triumphant about her natal celebration. 
© © © 

The engagement announcement of Miss Gertrude Jolliffe and 
Dr. Herbert Allen has given society a pleasurable thrill from 
which the element of surprise is not entirely lacking. While 
Dr. Allen has been much in the company of that fascinating 




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July 18, 1914. 



and California Adverti 



lser 



13 



young lady, the fact that he was associated with her brother-in- 
law, coupled with the well known capacity of the Jolliffe girls 
to enjoy the pleasant companionship of men without losing 
their hearts to them, did not arouse the suspicions of the 
matchmakers as it would under ordinary circumstances. When 
Miss Gertrude went up to Sobre la Vista, the country home of 
her sister, Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels, a friend taxed her with the 
soft impeachment, which she denied. It was not until the 
family was foregathered at the Tahoe home of Herbert 
Moffitt, the other day, that the formal announcement was 
made. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hobart joined the family party, 
and shared in the happiness of the announcement, Mrs. Hobart, 
who is almost as close as a sister in the family, being one of 
the few who has been a party to the secret for several weeks 
before the announcement was made. The wedding will take 
place this fall, probably at the end of October, or the begin- 
ning of November. The bride-elect is the youngest member 
of the family, and is called "Rosie" by her intimates, although 
she is "Gertrude" by the family Bible. She is a slender bru- 
nette, with the fine features that are the characteristics of her 
family. An artist in Paris, who did some of their portraits, ex- 
pressed it when he said : "Those Jolliffe madamoiselles have 
such good bone structure!" Miss Gertrude, like her sister Vir- 
ginia, is a great pet in the Burlingame set, where she spends 
much of her time. 

e © 9 

It is whispered in authoritative undertone that the retirement 
of Major Sydney A. Cloman as military attache of the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition, came as a very disagreeable surprise to the 
distinguished Major and his charming wife. Of course they 
are models of inscrutability and reticence on the matter, and 
if forced to express themselves, imply that it was altogether in 
the routine of things, and very much to be expected, if not 
ardently desired. But their friends are not so cautious, and 
are saying things about the politics that have been played to 
separate the Major from this post, with the possibility of ap- 
pointment to Panama or the Philippines. Their friends say 
that the Clomans have been allowed to stir up the cake, and 
now just when it is ready to serve, all crispy and beautifully 
frosted, some one else is allowed to come along and lick the 
frosting. The Clomans, with their wealth to command, have 
entertained lavishly for pre-exposition affairs. All the visiting 
notables have been handsomely entertained by the hospitable 
Clomans, who know how to do such things beautifully. But of 
course, the real fun will not begin until the Exposition doors 
swing wide welcome to the world. All the great houses down 
the peninsula way are getting in readiness for that event, and 
the Clomans had naturally looked forward to the time when the 
curtain would roll up for the climax. And now comes the or- 
der of change, and another military attache will answer to the 
call to action. One satisfaction the Clomans must have; that is, 
the sense of personal loss which all their friends feel over 
their departure. 



The young and lanky wayfarer stood before the cheese 

counter. "Do you sell Swiss cheese?" he inquired. "Yes, sir," 
replied the polite clerk. "And do you charge for the holes in 
the cheese?" "Of course not." The long and lanky wayfarer 
fumbled in his pockets and found them empty. "What can I 
do for you? asked the clerk. "I'm broke, boss," replied the 
wayfarer; "I guess you better give me the holes in the cheese. 
They'll do to-day." — Exchange. 



Willie was struggling through the story in his reading 

lesson. "No; it was not a sloop. It was a larger vessel. By 

its rig, I judged it to be a " The word was new to him. 

"Barque!" supplied the teacher. Still Willie hesitated, and 
looked bewildered. "Barque! Barque!" repeated the teacher, 
this time sharply. Willie looked as though he had not heard 
aright. Then, with an apprehensive look around the class, he 
shouted, "Bow-wow!" — Detroit Free Press. 



"What became of the college man who was known as 

a 'walking encyclopedia?' " asked the new arrival in Bad Man's 
Canyon. "He turned into a 'running encyclopedia,' stranger," 
responder Amber Pete, quietly. "Running?" "Yes, he began 
spouting off a lot of big words, and we just ran him out of 
town." — Exchange. 




ON A FLYLEAF OF OMAR. 

Poet-Astronomer, who night by night 

God's star-page scanned, yet failed to read aright, 

Where throughout space His alphabet of suns 
Spells Life, in extinguishable light! 

For not, if cycling Time might blot the whole 
Of that vast scheme from the illumined scroll, 

The Worlds, incalculable to rayless void, 
Could cease of Man the imperishable Soul. 

O finite mind that would the infinite 

To challenge seek, and measure! Piteous plight! 

How happier the bird of lightest wing, 
That soars and trusts the Teacher of its flight. 

An empty glass upon a broken shrine, 
What matters it ? the quaffed or unquaffed wine ? 
See the clear goblet with what nectar brimmed 
From fountains inexhaustible divine! 

— Ina Coolbrith. 



AN EXILE. 

I can remember the plaint of the wind on the moor 
Crying at dawning, and crying at shut of the day, 

And the call of the gulls that is eery and dreary and dour, 
And the sound of the surge as it breaks on the beach of the 
bay. 

I can remember the thatch of the cot and the byre 
And the green of the garth just under the dip of the fells, 

And the low of the kine, and the settle that stood by the fire 
And the reek of the peat, and the redolent heathery smells, 

And I long for it all though the roses around me are red, 
And the arch of the sky overhead has bright blue for a lure, 

And glad were the heart of me, glad, if my feet could but tread 
The path, as of old. that led upward and over the moor! 

— Clinton Scollard. 



THISTLES. 



They blow by the wayside, they march in the wood. 

"Tell me, for what are these vile weeds good?" 

Not as a crop for your meadow land. 

Not to seize and crush in your hand. 

Not to eat, and not to smell; 

Nor daisy-like can they fortunes tell. 

Asses may eat„and take no harm — 

Monkeys may hug them with unscathed arm — 

But you — beware! how you touch this thing, 

This amethyst-emerald bloom with a sting. 

And yet — strange! — once did I know a man 

Who watched all day where the thistles ran 

In glorious straggling multitude 

Out of the border of a wood. 

He watched, enthralled, the whole day through. 

Only when night hid from his view 

Their purple riot of useless wars, 

He turned, half-loath, to the kindred stars. 

— Arthur Davison Ficke. 



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14 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 




-■■■•-''• '•■■" ■■ "■' -''-''-"'■ ,; — ^- : J1-^'— '' '■■.■'-'■"■:■"- Ml'MMM'|gM *A' "•'^^i "'''' I! 




ENGAGEMENTS. 

AMES-SCOTT. — The engagement was made known last week of Mrs. 
Norma Preston Ames and Harry Seott. Mrs. Ames is a clever musi- 
cian. She is the daughter of Mrs. Edgar Preston and the late Colonel 
Preston, and a sister of Mrs. Willard Drown and Frank Preston. 
Harry Scott is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott, is a member 
of the Burlingame and University Clubs, and is the resident manager 
ni one of our large insurance companies. He is a brother of Mrs. 
Walter Martin. Preston Scott and Lawrence Irving Scott. The wed- 
ding will take place shortly, and will be a small affair at the home of 
the Willard Drowns, with none but the relatives in attendance. 

HARRISON-KEYES. — An engagement of interest to local society and 
service circles is that of Miss Leila Harrison, daughter of the late 
Colonel George Harrison. U. S. A., and Mrs. Harrison, to Lieutenant 
Geoffrey Keyes of the Sixth Cavalry. Miss Harrison and her mother 
came west from Washington last spring to attend the wedding of her 
brother. Lieutenant Wm, Harrison. 

.IOLLIFFE-ALLEN. — From Lake Tahoe came the interesting announce- 
ment of the engagement of Miss Gertrude Jolliffe, of the Jolliffe sisters 
of San Francisco, to Dr. Herbert W. Allen, one of this city's most 
prominent young physicians. Miss Jolliffe is a sister of Mrs. Herbert 
Moffit, and of the Misses Virginia, Frances and Mary Jolliffe. and is 
the youngest member of the family. She belongs to the exclusive 
Greenway set and to the Cinderellas, and is a popular member of 
the Burlingame Country Club set. Dr. Allen is also a member of the 
exclusive set, and of the University Club, where he has made his 
home. 

PISCHEL-FLETCHER. — The engagement was made known last week of 
Miss Inez Pischel and Harold Augustus Fletcher. Miss Inez Pischel 
is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Kaspar Pischel and a sister of Miss 
Zephyr Pischel and of Dohrmann and Harold Pischel. F. W. Dohr- 
mann is her grandfather, and her uncles are A. B. C. Dohrmann and 
Frederick Dohrmann, Jr. She belongs to one of the exclusive coteries 
in society. Her fiance is the son of Mr, and Mrs. Frederick N. 
Fletcher of Reno, Nev., and a brother of Miss Ethel Fletcher and 
Howard and Russell Fletcher. No date has been set for the wed- 
ding, as it will be an event of the summer of 1915. 

WILHOIT- NORTHCOTT. — Word comes from London of the engagement 
of Miss June Hazeltine Wilhoit, to Mr. Arthur Gordon Northcott, son 
Of James Northcott of Oxshott, Surrey, England. The Wilhoit family 
are wealthy Stockton people, well known in San Francisco. Mrs. 
Calla Wilhoit, since being divorced, has lived in the East and abroad. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
GIRVIN-TEVIS. — A pretty August wedding will be that of Miss Lee Gir- 
vin, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Girvin of Menlo Park, and 
Lloyd Tevis, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. S. Tevis. Miss Girvin 
will be attended by her cousin, Miss Elena Eyre, as maid of honor, 
and her bridesmaids will be the Misses Ysabel Chase. Evelyn Barron, 
Martha Foster and Edith von Schroeder. 

WEDDINGS. 

ELLIS-HENES. — The marriage of Miss Evelyn Ellis, one of the beautiful 
girls of local society, and Louis George Henes, a graduate of Columbia 
University, was quietly solemnized Tuesday morning at 9:30 o'clock at 
the home of the bride's father, A. T. Ellis, 749 Oakland avenue. Rev. 
Father Ramm of San Francisco officiating. After the ceremony a 
wedding breakfast was served. The couple departed immediately 
afterward for their honeymoon, keeping their destination a secret. 
The bride is one of the most beautiful girls in Oakland, being a tall 
and statuesque blonde. She is a graduate from a fashionable finish- 
ing school at Menlo Park, and is a talented linguist. The bridegroom 
comes from a representative Eastern family. On their return from 
their wedding trip the young couple will* establish their home in 
Oakland. 

LIGHTBODY-COLEMAN.— Miss Lucille Lightbody and Claude B. Cole- 
man, of Berkeley, were married at 5 o'clock Sunday afternoon by the 
Reverend H. H. Powell, Chaplain of the Berkeley Lodge of Elks, of 
which Coleman is a member. Mr. Coleman is connected with the 
California Insurance Company. The bride is the daughter of Mrs. 
Nancy Lightbody, 6811 Stuart street, and the bridegroom has been 
living with his mother, Mrs. B. Griffin, 2021 Lincoln street. Follow- 
ing an automobile tour to Carmel. the couple will live in Oakland. 

MARING- LENNON. — Miss Gertrude Elaine Maring of Newcastle, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Maring. old residents of Placer County, 
was married Wednesday night to Mr. Mark Lennon, the ceremony tak- 
ing place at Newcastle, with the Rev. Dr. Snow of the Auburn Epis- 
copal Church, reading the service. Mr. and Mrs. Lennon left for 
Southern California, and will reside in Oakland after the first of next 
months Miss Myrtle Maring and Mr. Roger Lennon were the at- 
tendants, and afterwards there was a small reception at the Maring 
home. 

McCONNELL-STRITE.— F. Harmon McConnell, Secretary and general 
manager of the Sacramento Valley Development Company, and Miss 
Blanche Strile. daughter of Mrs. Samuel Harvey Strite, widow of the 
late treasurer of the George F. Everhard Company, of this city, were 
married quietly at the Strite homo, in Dana street. Berkeley, on July 
16th. On account of the death of Miss Suite's father last fall., the 



wedding was of the simplest. The young people? after their honey- 
moon trip, will divide their time between a home in Oakland and Mr. 
McConnell's country place in Yolo County, north of Woodland. Miss 
Stride is a popular girl who has made her home for several years in 
the college town, where her mother is a prominent clubwoman. She 
is a syster of Mrs. Lloyd Rowley. Mr. McConnell is the stepson or 
John J. Boyce, formerly United States Attorney for Alaska. He is 
a University of California graduate, a member of the Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity. For the past five years he has traveled in Europe 

WILLIAMS-ROPE. — From Buffalo, N. Y., comes the news of the wed- 
ding of Miss Gertrude May Williams, daughter of Lewis A, Williams, 
of San Francisco, formerly of Buffalo, to Raymond F. Rope, of Buf- 
falo, on June 26th, Rev. Carl D, Case, rector of Delaware avenue 
Baptist Church, officiating. The ceremony took place in the home of 
the bride's sister and brother, Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Williams. Af- 
ter an extended wedding trip, Mr. and Mrs. Rope will reside per- 
manently in Buffalo. 

TEAS. 

CLIFTON. — Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Clifton was hostess at an informal 
tea in honor of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Otto Schultze of Napa, who 
is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Campbell. 

GHIRARDELLI. — Miss Esperance Ghlrardelli gave a tea a1 the home of 
her mother. Mrs. Domingo Ghirardelli. on Pacific avenue Tuesday. 
The motif for the event was Miss Florence Orr. 

KNKCHT. — Miss Anna Knecht. of Los Angeles, who is the house guesl 
of her brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Gustave Knecht, at 
their home on Twentieth avenue, was the reason for a tea given by 
Mrs. Knecht Wednesday afternoon. 

MAY.— Tuesday afternoon. Miss Edna Lawrence shared the honors with 
Miss Erna Hermann at a prettily appointed tea presided over by Miss 
Edith Mau in her home in Van Ness avenue. 

MURRAY. — General and Mrs. Arthur Murray were host and hostess at 
an informal 4 o'clock tea on Monday afternoon at the St. Francis 

NOKES. — Mrs. Ord Preston, of Washington, who is visiting her parents. 
General and Mrs. Arthur Murray, at their home at Fort Mason, was 
the feted guest on Tuesday afternoon at a small tea given l>v Mrs, 
Norval Nokes at her home in Pacific avenue. 

PRESSLEY. — Mrs. George Pressley was hostess at a matinee party and 
tea afterward in the Palace Monday, her guest of honor being Miss 
Florence Orr. 

REGENSBERGER. — Miss Marian Regensberger was hostess at a prettily 
appointed tea at the Palace one afternoon last week. 

WENDLING. — Miss Florence Wendllng was hostess at a bridge tea last 
Saturday afternoon at her home in Haight street in compliment to 
Miss Florence Orr and Miss Marjorie Emmons, two brides-to-be, 

LUNCHEONS. 

ESBERG. — Mrs. Matilda Esberg gave a most enjoyable luncheon at her 
charming new home at Loyola on Thursday last. 

GUYER. — Mrs. George Guyer, wife of Captain Guyer at the Presidio, was 
hostess at a beautifully appointed luncheon at her home at the Army 
Post on last Wednesday, her guest of honor being Mrs. Charles 
Farnsworth, wife of Major Farnsworth of the 16th Infantry. 

HOPKINS. — Miss Gertrude Hopkins was hostess recently at a luncheon 
at Menlo Park, entertaining some members of the golf club. 

MORTON. — Mrs. Oliver Dwlght Morton gave a luncheon on Thursday last 
with Miss Jennie Hooker as guest of honor. 

SIMMONS. — Edward Simmons, the noted artist, gave a luncheon at the 
St. Francis las week in honor of Mrs. Pelham Ames and Mrs. Thos. 
Robbins, who are his cousins. 

TREADWELL. — Mrs. James Treadwell gave a delightful farewell luncheon 
before she and Mr. Treadwell departed on Thursday last on a motor- 
ing trip through Lake and Mendocino Counties. 

DINNERS. 

BRI'NE. — Ernest Brune gave a dinner at the Olympic Club last Thursday 
evening !n honor of Mrs. Playfair of Sydney, and her daughter. Miss 
Oahlis Playfair. It was "ladies' night" at the club. 

DAVIS.— Mrs. Eugene G. Davis entertained six friends at dinner at the 
Cecil on Thursday evening. 

HARRISON. — Lieutenant and Mrs. Ralph C. Harrison entertained friends 
at dinner at their home at Fort Scott Wednesday. 

KIRKPATRICK.— Colonel John C. Kirkpatrlck was host at a merry little 
dinner dance Wednesday night, entertaining his guests In one of tin- 
private dining salons of the Palace Hotel. 

LOWE. — Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Ashbrooke Lowe were hosts at a dinner 
party in their home in Pacific avenue on Wednesday night. 

MacDONALD. — Mrs. Alan MacDonald was hostess Tuesday at a luncheon 
inher home at Sea Cliff, her guest of honor being Miss Ethel Bacon, 
of Louisville, Kentucky, who Is the house guest of her sister. Mrs. 
Graeme MacDonold. 

PEARKES. — On Tuesday evening, Miss Edith Pearkes was hostess at an 
informal dinner as a farewell to her fiance, Lieutenant Vulte, and 
Lieutenant Robert Skelton, who left Wednesday for the California, 
which is In Mexican waters. 

RAISCH. — Miss Almee Raisch was hostess at a delightful dinner at her 
home in Clay street on Monday evening, when she entertained a 
dozen guests in compliment to Miss Edith Pearkes and her fkm. e, 

Lieutenant Hermann T. Vulte. United States marine COr'pS, 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



DANCES. 
BE^ LARD. Miss Si tve a small dance on Saturday • 

to about thirty "i the younger set In the home of her parents. Mi 

and Mrs. i Beylard, on the county road near San Mateo 

OFFICERS' CLUB. — One of the delightful events of the week was tin 

Club at the Presidio on Thursday evening. 

iii. hosts, were Major Wlllard New-bill. Major Sherwood Cheney and 

i i Samuel Bottoms. 

MOTORING. 
MARTIN. One of the congenial coteries which set out last week for a 
motoring trip to last several weeks included Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin. Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Whitman and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Templeton Crocker. 

WEEK-END PARTIES. 
CAROLAN.— Francis Carolajl entertained a dozen house guests over the 

week end at the beautiful Carolan estate. Beaulleu, in the foothills 

near Mountain View. 
MOORE. — To celebrate the seventeenth birthday of their daughter, Miss 

Josephine Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore entertained a num- 

ber of their friends at a Jolly house party at their country home near 

Santa Cruz. 
5EARLES. — Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Searles, who are at their summer home 

near Los Gatos. are entertaining as their house guests Mr. and Mrs. 

A. N. Follansbee, Jr. 

ARRIVALS. 

I1AYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Robin Hayne have returned from a short visit 
with Mr. and Mrs. Felton Elkins at Santa Barbara. 

HENLEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Barclay Henley. Jr., who have been visiting the 
William Coopers at Santa Barbara, returned to town Monday. 

LAWRENCE. — Mrs. E. R. Lawrence and her daughter, Miss Edna Law- 
rence, are domiciled in the St. Francis, where they will be for the 
next two weeks or so. 

NELSON. — Lieutenant and Mrs. G. E. Nelson, who have been stationed 
at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, for the last five years, arrived in town 
Monday, and are guests of Mrs. C. H. Huffman in Broadway. 

PFAFF. — Mrs. Melvin Pfaff and Miss Helen Johnson, who have been at 
Brookdale in the Santa Cruz Mountains for the last two weeks, re- 
turned to town on Sunday. 

REAGAN. — Mrs. John Reagan arrived from Boise, Idaho, with her two 
children to visit the several Merle families over the summer. 

SELFR1DGE. — Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge. who have been passing the 
last three weeks at their ranch in the Santa Cruz Mountains, returned 
to their home in Clay street the last of the week. 

HI II ELS. — Dr. and Mrs. J. Wilson Shiels. who have been sojourning at 
Aetna Springs for the last fortnight, returned to town this week. 

WiiiiHWORTH. — Mrs. Selim Woodworth and Miss Dorothy Woodworth. 
who have been traveling leisurely through Europe for the last year, 
returned home last week. 

DEPARTURES. 

BRODERSON.— William E. Broderson sailed Friday on the steamer China 

en route for Honolulu, where he will remain for several weeks. Many 

friends were at the pier wishing him bon VOya 
BOWLES. — Mr. and Mrs. Philip E. Bowies are en route to New York, 

whence they will sail soon for Europe. They will be away about 

six months. 
OIILLEN.— Mr. and Mrs. Jack Cullcn, Lloyd G. Cullen, Mr. Oscar H. Cur- 

taz and Miss Delight Curtaz. left Thursday last to motor to Tahoe, 

via Truckee. 
HOOKER. — Miss Jennie Hooker has gone t" Santa Barbara to visit Mrs. 

William Holmes McKitlrlek. 

KIERTJLFF. — Mr. and Mrs. W. J. L. Klorulff sailed Wednesday on the 

liner Matsonia for the Hawaiian Islands. 
LA MONTAGNE.— Clinton La MODtSgne left Tuesdaj fOl Klamath Falls. 

where, with several friends, he will enjoy a fortnight's hunting and 

fishing, 

ROLPH. — Mr. and Mrs. George Rolph and the Misses Rolph left p 

for Southern California, going by automo 
SCHULZB.— Mrs. Oscar Schulae, mother of Mrs. Horace Clifton, left on 

S.i 1 11 i.l.i v Uii CSJ B the summer with relatives In the coun- 

try neai Montreal. 
i .I'll i: ll i Isrlch Zelle and her sister. Mrs. J. G. Lelbold. left 

vTednesdaj to spend a couple of weeks on a ranch In the Santa 

(■in/. Mount 

INTIMATIONS. 
AMES. Mr. and Mrs Pelhttm Ames have taken a house at San Mateo. 

where their daughter, Mis Thomas Robblns, will spend the summer 

with them. 
■ i ii\ BR. .Rear-Admiral Richardson Clover, V. S. N.. (retired) and Mrs. 

Clover have come from Washington, I'. C, to spend the summer In 

their country home In St. Helena. 
KNIQHT. — Mrs. l'rod Knight and Mrs. Samuel Monsarratt. who have 

been In Santa Barbai past week, have gone on to Los An- 

s, and may decide to go to Corona. I,, before returning to San 

Fraw 
LEE. Mr. and Mrs. Cuylet Lee and children have taken the cottage at 

io del Mont, fe it' remainder of tin- summer. 
MARTIN. M's Eleanor Martin returned to her home In Broadv 

Sunday after a delightful sojourn of three weeks at Btirllngame as 

the guest ol til. Waller S Ma' tills. 

in. Mrs, All IS in Floret. 

left San 1'; ral months ago for a tour of the world. 

Wkii.i turn to California for the 

> ilgllSt. 

remain in 1' onth. 




A man who tangoes is a tangoer — a girl who tangoes is 

a tangerine. — Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 

Bride — Oh, dear, Hugo's leave is up to-morrow and we 

haven't half finished our honeymoon. — Fliegende Blatter. 

— — Knicker — Something queer about Jones. Bocker — Yes; 
he is the only man who can't explain the high cost of living.— 
Judge. 

— —"Waiter, this knife is blunt and the steak is like lea- 
ther." "How would it do to strop the knife on the steak, sir?" 
— Exchange. 

Magistrate — Are you interested in this case? Witness 

for the Prosecution — Yes, sir; the prisoner cut my acquaint- 
ance. — Buffalo Express. 

. Biggs — You may laugh at Bumberly's talk, but he has a 

fine mind,_ just the same. Diggs — Of course he has — almost 
microscopic, I should say. — Exchange. 

Mrs. Knox — Mrs. Peeper is certainly a tiresome business 

woman. Mrs. Blox — Indeed! What business is she engaged 
in? Mrs. Knox — Everybody's. — Exchange. 

Prizefighter (after one look at his opponent) — Take my 

gloves off, Walter. His Second — Waffor ? Prizefighter — I ain't 
goin' to fight 'im — I'm goin' to kiss 'im. — The Tattler. 

"Why is it," queried the very young man, "that women 

never tell their age?" "Because," answered the wise guy, 
"they are always old enough to know better." — Exchange. 

"Where were you last night?" asked one girl of another. 

"I was out riding with father in his car." "But I did not know 
your father has an automobile." "He hasn't; he is a motor- 
man." — Indianapolis News. 

"Who are those two weary looking men who both admit 

they are afraid to go home?" "One," replied Miss Cayenne, 
"is the husband of a suffragist and the other is the husband 
of an anti-suffragist." — Washington Star. 

"What have you got in the package?" "Drawing mater- 
ials." "I didn't know that you were an artist." "Artist noth- 
ing! It contains a couple of pairs of forceps the dentist asked 
me to get for him." — Boston Transcript. 

Johnny — It's funny, ain't it, that everybody in our family 

is some kind of an animal? Father — What do you mean? 
Johnny — Why, mother's a dear, and baby is a little lamb, and 
I'm the kid, and you're the goat. — Chicago Daily News. 



MIDLAND CASUALTY ENTERS NEW FIELD. 

Will Write Burglary and Theft and Plate Glass. Increases 
Surplus Fifty Thousand Dollars by Reducing Capital. 

The Midland Casualty Company is adding $50,000 to its sur- 
plus by reducing its capital from $250,000 to $200,000. It is 
also amending its charter by substituting Burglary and Theft 
Insurance and Plate Glass Insurance in place of Liability In- 
surance now permitted by its charter. The officers do not be- 
lieve that conditions in Liability and Compensation Insurance 
would warrant any new company entering that field at this 
time. With the added strength that the company now has by 
this increase in its surplus will not only push its accident and 
health lines more aggressively than heretofore, but will begin 
at once building up an agency force for its new line of Bur- 
glary and Theft and Plate Glass. Mr. W. S. Cluff, its present 
Superintendent of Agents, who has had many years of practical 
experience, will be in charge of these new lines. 



BANK BOOK LOST 

Union Trust Company Savings Bank Account Book Number 
21376 has been lost. Finder is requested to return it to 
Union Trust Company, Grant Avenue and Market Street. 
San Francisco. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 






The balance sheet as of April 30, 1914, shows assets of $27,- 
114,492, and liabilities of $27,114,492. 



FINANCIAL 



Bondholders and noteholders of 
People's Water Co. the People's Water Company met 

last Monday and elected protective 
committees to confer on a reorganization plan. The meetings, 
held separately, were called to order by John Drum, chairman 
of the refunding committee. Drum explained that the com- 
mittees would be powerless to bind the security holders to any 
plan, but would merely be empowered to agree among them- 
selves upon a plan, which would be reported to the security 
holders, who could then adopt or reject it. 

The bondholders met first at 10 o'clock and elected the fol- 
lowing committee: C. O. G. Miller, president of the Pacific 
Lighting Corporation; George H. Collins, a director of the same 
company; Henry E. Bothin, Martin Judge Jr., bond manager 
for Byrne Sr McDonnell, and I. Strassburger, broker. The com- 
mittee organized at once by electing Miller chairman. Miller, 
Collins and Bothin are among the largest holders of bonds. 
Strassburger has been instrumental in placing many of the 
bonds and represents clients, while Judge represents one of the 
largest individual holders. The noteholders met at 11 o'clock 
and elected the following committee: R. D. Robbins, a banker 
of Suisun; Alexander D. Keyes, representing the Humboldt 
Savings Bank; J. F. Carlson, of the Central National Bank of 
Oakland, T. L. Miller and F. M. Wilson. The noteholders' 
committee organized by electing R. D. Robbins chairman. 

The first mortgage bondholders of the Contra Costa Water 
Company last Saturday elected the following protective com- 
mittee : John A. Hooper, of the Mutual Savings Bank, repre- 
senting 175 bonds; Wm. J. Dutton, of the Firemen's Fund In- 
surance Company, 101 bonds; A. Sbarboro, of the Italian- 
American Bank, representing a large block; F. W. Van Sicklen, 
of the Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank, E. K. Mcintosh, 
of the Bank of California. 

On the same day, the holders of first mortgage bonds of the 
Oakland Water Company elected the following committee: 
Percy T. Morgan, of the Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank; 
John D. McKee, of the Mercantile National Bank; Herbert E. 
Clayburgh, of J. Barth & Co. 



The Pacific Mail Steamship Com- 

Pacific Mail's Year. pany reports income account for 

the year ended April 30, 1914, with 
comparisons as shown in the table below : 

Operating income— April 30, 1914 April 30, 1913 

Operating revenues $5,566,130 $5,537,335 

Operating expenses 4,233,159 4,459,219 

Depreciation 510,567 519,372 

Total operating expenses $4,743,727 $4,978,591 

Net operating revenues $ 822,403 $ 558,744 

Taxes 9,655 7,290 

Net operating income $ 812,748 $ 551,454 

Total other income 36,951 36,503 

Gross income $ 849,699 $ 587,957 

Deductions from gross income — 

Miscellaneous rents $ 135,910 $ 155,119 

Miscellaneous charges 2,949 1,169 

Total deducted from gross income. .$ 138,859 $ 157,288 

Net income $ 710,840 $ 430,669 

Purchase money notes — SS. Mongolia 
and Manchuria maturing during the 

year, paid off 410,178 410,177 

Surplus $ 300,662 $ 20,492 



The reorganization committee for 
Natomas Reorganization. Natomas Consolidated has issued 
a plea to the security holders beg- 
ging them not to delay in depositing their bonds and stocks 
in conformity with the plan of reorganization, which has al- 
ready been agreed to by the European holders of more than 
$5,000,000 of the first mortgage bonds. The letter, which bears 
the personal signatures of every member of the committee, 
urges prompt action, and embodies the following paragraph : 

"From an impartial survey of the entire situation it seems to 
us apparent that, unless the proposed plan of reorganization 
is speedily accepted by a sufficient number of bondholders to 
make the plan effective, litigation, receivership or bankruptcy 
will follow, which will mean ruin." 

It is stated in the letter that the directors of the company do 
not think it proper for the reclamation work to be continued 
and the company to become thereby further indebted to persons 
for labor, supplies and material, unless the reorganization of the 
company is agreed upon and arrangements made thereby for 
the payment of these creditors. 

"Therefore, unless bondholders sufficient to make up the 
necessary number to insure the plan becoming effective, de- 
posit their bonds forthwith, the reclamation work and the other 
operations of the company will probably be discontinued." 

Inclosed with the committee's letter is one from Emery 
Oliver, general manager of the Natomas enterprises, in which 
he enumerates the principal items of expenditure between July 
10th and January 1st next, which must be provided for if the 
company is to continue to operate. The total is $1,332,236.38. 
Oliver estimates the company's income for the remainder of 
this calendar year at $803,000. 



In connection with the profit sharing 
Pacific Gas & Electric plan of the Pacific Gas and Electric 
Profit Sharing. Company, the Mercantile National 

Bank has issued the following cir- 
cular concerning the operation of the plan : 

"Believing in the sound investment value of the new first 
preferred stock of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company now 
offered to the stockholders and employees of the said com- 
pany, realizing the mutual benefits which will accrue to the 
company and its employees through a general adoption of the 
profit-sharing plan set forth in the circular letter of the com- 
pany to its employees dated July 1, 1914, and desiring to assist 
this worthy plan, this bank, if desired, will be very glad to 
lend to any employees of the said company, who have paid the 
first two payments on account of subscriptions to the said stock 
amounting to $20 per share, one-half of the amount necessary 
to make each subsequent payment; that is, the bank is willing 
to advance $6.25 per share for each of the payments due Octo- 
ber 1, 1914; January 1, April 1, July 1 and October 1, 1915, 
providing the remaining half of each said installment payment 
is simultaneously paid by the subscriber." 



President Pond, of the West Sacramento Company, an- 
nounced this week that he lacked only 7 bonds of having se- 
cured the deposit of 82 per cent of the outstanding bonds of 
the company, under the plan of reorganization. 



There will be a supper dance and dancing contest at 

Techau Tavern on the evening of July 22d. On this occasion 
there will be two prizes for each winning couple, a suitable 
gift for the gentleman and one for the lady, while every one 
who is present will receive an attractive souvenir. The dan- 
cing will commence at 9 o'clock, and continue throughout the 
entire evening, and as an added attraction, five beautiful orna- 
ments from the S. &. G. Gump Co. will be presented to as many 
of the lady guests. At the informal dance at the Tavern on 
Wednesday evening, July 15th, former Judge Daniel presided, 
and his felicitous remarks were well received by the large 
crowd which was present. He was heartily applauded when 
it was learned that he is again candidate for Police Judge. On 
this occasion the Tavern was crowded as it always is on dance 
riights. 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 




Rebellious Ulster. 

Sir Edward Carson threatens civil war in Ulster should home 
rule for Ireland be put in force. A Belfast despatch says : 

"The first meeting of the Ulster provisional government since 
it was formed has been called for at the request of Sir Ed- 
ward Carson, the Ulster Unionist leader. 

"According to Captain James Craig, the result of the meet- 
ing will have an important bearing on the Irish situation, but 
he declares there is no intention on the part of the Ulsterites, 
whatever happens, to set up a parliament for themselves in 
Ulster. 

"They claim the right merely to hold the province in trust 
for the constitution of the United Kingdom, in order that Ul- 
ster should continue to be an integral part of the British Em- 
pire. 

"The clauses of the constitution of the provisional govern- 
ment which, until now, have not been disclosed, expressly pro- 
vide that 'upon the restoration of the directly imperial govern- 
ment, the provisional government shall cease to exist,' and 'the 
provisional government, while it is in power, shall maintain 
and enforce all the statute laws now in force in Ireland other 
than the statute establishing a home rule government.' 

"Arrangements have been made to receive Sir Edward Car- 
son on his arrival. Four hundred Ulster volunteers, armed 
with rifles and fixed bayonets, will escort him to the place of 
meeting." 



The Lipton Scandal. 

A London despatch relates that criminal prosecution of Sir 
Thomas Lipton, the chairman and his co-directors in Lipton, 
Ltd., was suggested by Sir Arthur Markham, a Liberal mem- 
ber, in a question addressed to parliamentary papers. 

The question, the putting of which was postponed by ar- 
rangement, asks whether in view of Justice Darling's statement 
that the defendants in the army canteen scandal case were act- 
ing on a system which was encouraged by the directorate of 
the company, the attorney general "has laid the papers in the 
case before the public prosecutor with a view to criminal pro- 
ceedings for fraud and bribery against Sir Thomas Lipton and 
his co-directors." 

The question arose out of the recent conviction of nine army 
officers and eight civilians employes of Lipton, on charges 
of receiving and giving bribes to influence the allotment of 
supply contracts for the army canteens. 



Hindu Exclusion from Canada. 

A Vancouver, B. C, despatch says that British Columbia 
finished with one vexing problem, and it is possible another 
one was set for the Indian empire when about 300 Hindus, on 
board the steamer Komagata Maru abandoned their fight for 
admission to Canada and agreed to go back home. They have 
been there over a month, and the Komagata Maru was specially 
chartered to bring them from India via Japan. Their stay has 
been marked by plots to assassinate the local immigration 
officers not traceble to any one on the boat, and by all possible 
legal proceedings. They were refused permission to land be- 
cause they did not come directly from India; because they 
did not have $200 apiece, required by the immigration laws, 
and because they were held to be common laborers, liable to 
become public charges, and hence not entitled to admission. 

Whether the men on the boat expected to be allowed to 
land or not cannot be learned definitely. Their coming is said 
to have been financed by wealthy Hindus unfavorable to Eng- 
lish rule, on the theory that if they got in. it would open the 
door lor others, and if they were excluded, what they would 
have to say on reaching home would not make the path of the 
government any more smooth. One report was that the men 
on the boat were picked purposely from districts known favor- 
ably for their loyalty to the British, in order to disaffect them. 

To-day, Gurdit Singh, the leader, instructed his counsel un- 



conditionally to arrange for the return of the Komagata Maru. 
The ship's owners ordered her back a week or so ago, but the 
captain dared not sail, fearing his passengers would be unruly. 



Australian Manners and Customs. 

The Rev. F. C. Spurr makes a most interesting survey of the 
people of Australia, in the course of which he says: "A people 
materially prosperous in a new land are liable to forget the 
higher things. _ Wealth tends to make them vulgar, and to 
limit their horizon. There are very many refined people — 
especially in connection with the churches— who keep them- 
selves abreast of current thought; people who live in tasteful 
houses, who are models of courtesy, and who generally under- 
stand the art of savoir vivre. The children of many wealthy 
people proceed to the university. There are hundreds of young 
women in Melbourne who have graduated in Arts, Science or 
Law, not in order to obtain a livelihood, but solely for the 
culture which the study brings. But the rank and file of the 
people — who obtain good wages— have little intellectual am- 
bition beyond the football or the cricket fields, or the prize 
ring at the Stadium. 

"The manners of the rank and file leave much to be de- 
sired._ The doctrine that 'Jack is as good as his master,' as 
practiced in Australia, too often results, not in the elevation of 
Jack to the rank of his master, but in the coarsening of Jack. 
The Chief Justice has recently been lecturing our youth upon 
its rudeness. The rebuke is deserved. Rudeness is the char- 
asteristic of the average young man out here. It is a pity, and 
it need not be. Nothing is more necessary for this young coun- 
try than the inculcation of the spirit of respect. 

"My earlier impression of the new type of British life which 
is being evolved under the Southern Cross has been abundantly 
confirmed during the past five years. There can be no ques- 
tion that the Australian type of Briton is wholly different from 
the English type. For this difference the climate is chiefly re- 
sponsible. Close observation has revealed the fact that the 
third generation of Australians — that is, the generation which 
owns for its parents an Australian-born father and mother — 
tends towards the Italian or Spanish type rather than the Eng- 
lish. This third generation is one of jet black hair and dark 
eyes; it is the Italian or Sicilian type. This is particularly no- 
ticeable in Sydney and in Queensland. Life there is largely 
Neapolitan. A Neapolitan climate is producing a Neapolitan 
type of men and women. 

"The atmosphere of Puritanism, which has lingered over 
England even until this day, is wholly absent from Australia. 
The break between the two types of life is complete, and the 
distance between them seems destined to become wider. The 
British prejudice against the theatre, for example, does not 
exist out here. Great numbers of Church members openly 
patronize the playhouse. Some of the devoutest and most ear- 
nest Christian men I know find a place in their programme for 
the theatre, when good plays are staged. Australians, as a 
whole, are a sport-loving people. They are a happy people. 
They take all life in the sunshine, even their religious life. The 
minor chords are entirely absent from their music. All is gay 
and lively. 

"This spirit has invaded the Sabbath. The old-fashioned 
Sunday exists only for a small minority of persons. During the 
summer months tens of thousands of people spend the week- 
end amongst the hills or by the seaside, and the vast majority 
of these never trouble the churches. Yet, if they were chal- 
lenged, they would disclaim hostility to the Church — they might 
even contribute to its funds; nevertheless, Sunday is for them 
a day of pleasure." 



A practically new scenic region is opened by the Cali- 
fornia Western Railroad through Mendocino and Humboldt, 
between Willits and Fort Bragg, with 40 miles of unsurpassed 
scenery through the celebrated redwood forests, along the beau- 
tiful Noyo River and through the coming apple country of the 
State. Visit the Noyo River Tavern, the finest resort in the 
State, on the line of the railroad, midway between Willits and 
Fort Bragg. Fishing and hunting unexcelled. Beautiful sce- 
tennis. swimming, dancing, horseback riding. Pictur- 
esque mountain trails. High grade cuisine. Climate unsur- 
passed. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 




-•H mitn n: . . 



,lii..llHn"» VH 



By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

The Bis Auto Parade 

The Motor Car Parade which took place last Wednesday on 
the occasion of the dedication of the Automobile Section in the 
Transportatijn Building out at the Fair Grounds was something 
that is likely to stand for a record for some time to come. 

It was b} fa? the largest automobile parade ever seen in San 
Francisco. A striking feature of the turnout was that the 
great majority of those who participated were private owners. 
While the trade sent out a splendid representation, it was, 
however, the private owner who was responsible for the record. 

While the parade showed the earnestness of Californians 
in their desire to make history for the Panama-Pacific Fair, 
the parade, however, showed two things: First the strength 
of motor car owners, collectively, which, if intelligently han- 
dled, can gain great results for good roads, just legislation, and 
the sane and safe use of motor cars over highways and byways 
of the State. 

The speed at which the parade went forward showed the ex- 
pertness of the modern driver. The thousands of cars in line 
traveled from one line of the route to the other as fast as the 
law would allow. There was no jamming, collisions or acci- 
dents, and from the results, it might as well have been a half 
dozen cars proceeding to the Fair grounds. 

The parade has taught the Police Department something 
that it would be well to consider seriously, and that is: the 
handling of motor traffic on Van Ness avenue. There is no 
question but that, when the Fair opens, daily will be seen on 
Van Ness avenue and other streets as great a number of auto- 
mobiles as was out last Wednesday. A system of checking 
travel, both of the motorists and cross-town cars, will have to 
be worked out before Fair time. 



More Automobile Rules for Yosemlte 

The Interior Department has added the following rules gov- 
erning admission of automobiles to Yosemite National Park: 

Fines or other punishment will be imposed for arrival of 
automobiles at any point before approved elapsed time of pas- 
sage, at the following rates: 

Fifty cents per minute for each of first five minutes. One 
dollar per minute for each of the next twenty minutes. Twenty- 
five dollars fine or ejection from Park, or both, in discretion 
of acting superintendent, for being more than twenty-five min- 
utes early. Merced Grove to Cascade Creek checking station, 
11.7 miles, 10 miles per hour maximum speed, 1 hr. 19m. 
elapsed time between points. Cascade Creek to Pohono Bridge, 
2.75 miles, 8 miles per hour maximum speed, 21 m. elapsed 
time. Pohono Bridge to Camp Ahwahnee checking station, 
3.3 miles, 10 miles per hour maximum speed, 20 m. elapsed 
time. Ahwahnee to Sentinel Hotel, .88 mile, 10 miles per hour 
maximum speed, 6 m. elapsed time. Sentinel Hotel to Camp 
Curry, 1.15 miles, 10 miles per hour maximum speed, 7 m. 
elapsed time. Camp Curry to garage or Lost Arrow checking 
station, 1.25 miles, 10 miles per hour maximum speed, 6 m. 
elapsed time. 

Automobiles should check their watches with the station 
clock. 

For protection to motorists, no two automobiles while in 
motion should be less than 100 yards apart. All autombiles 
should maintain their gears constantly enmeshed while in mo- 
tion, except while shifting gears. 



Training 'or Road Building In France 

Jean de Pulligny, chief engineer of bridges and highways 
of France, has described the elaborate organization and care- 
ful training of that body in an article in Good Roads. M. de 
Pulligny, who is also director of the Mission of French Engi- 
neers to the United States, says in part: 

"The body of Ponts et Chausses has, for its foundation, 
patrolmen and chief patrolmen. These are plain laborers, 
generally of agricultural training, who take care of a section of 
road, canal or canalized river (length about 4 miles) under 
the direct order of an assistant engineer called 'Conducteur des 
Ponts et Chausses.' The conducteur generally resides in the 
capital of the canton, and has with him, as help or deputy 
one or more men, generally young, called 'Commis des Ponts 
et Chausses.' The 'commis' are recruited by an elementary 
competitive examination. The candidates have often served 
already in the office of some 'conducteur' or 'ingenieur' of the 
Ponts et Chausses as surveyor's helpers, draughtsmen, de- 
signers or practical helpers of some kind. The conducteurs are 
also recruited by a competitive examination, but a more diffi- 
cult one. Besides practical notions of surveying, of road and 
masonry construction, and of mechanics of materials, a good 
knowledge of elementary mathematics, physics, electricity and 
chemistry is required, putting that examination on a level simi- 
lar to that for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

"Boys enter the Ecole Polytechnique, the national training 
school, at from 18 to 21 years of age, by taking a very hard 
competitive examination, generally after two years of special 
training after their graduation as Bachelors of Philosophy. 
At the Ecole Polytechnique they are boarders, and the course 
last two years. They pay nothing and get no pay. The 
course is entirely of high science (mathematics, physics and 
chemistry), with little or no practical training. At the end of 
the course, all students get an appointment in the government 
service. They can choose it on a list of offerings after they 
are classified by the results of a competitive examination at 
the end of the second year. On the list of offerings are a few 
places in each of the national schools which the French govern- 
ment runs for training its own engineers — schools of mines, of 
bridges and highways, of gunpowder manufacture, of national 
factories (tobacco and matches), of telegraph and telephone, 
of shipbuilding, etc. All these appointments put together sel- 
dom number more than thirty or forty, and from 200 to 250 
students enter and leave the Ecole Polytechnique every year. 
The engineering places are always chosen from the first on the 
list. The 200 others enter the military schools for artillery 
officers and military engineers. 

"The organization above described has been in operation for 
more than a hundred years. Recently, two years of mili- 
tary service has been introduced between the years of studies 
in the Ecole Polytechnique and in the Ecole des Ponts et 
Chausses. Four-fifths of the candidates for the Ecole des 
Ponts et Chausses come from the Ecole Polytechnique. Those 
of the last fifth are taken from the conducteurs who have had 
at least six years of practice and are allowed, as a reward of 
very good services, to undergo a special and difficult examina- 
tion showing that their knowledge of science is sufficient to 
keep up in the classes with the boys who come from the Ecole 
Polytechnique. The courses of instruction at the Ecole des 
Ponts et Chausses are distributed over three years, with a 
session of lessons lasting about six months each year, the re- 
mainder of the time being devoted to laboratory and field work, 
preparation of designs for examination works, and practical 
training by acting as assistant engineers on works. 

"The program of the examination on theoretical science that 

young conducteurs must take before entering the Ecole des 

Ponts et Chausses runs the gamut of higher mathematics." 
* * * 

Final Link Given 

The final link for a roadway to connect Railroad Avenue with 
the San Mateo County highway has been given the city by the 
Crocker Estate Company. Their deeds convey a road 3,200 
feet long and 80 feet wide through their properties in the Visi- 
tacion Valley. City Engineer O'Shaughnessy says this prom- 
ises to become one of the most important arteries of travel to 
the South leading out of the city. A contract was let to pave 
with asphaltum one-half a mile of San Bruno road. This will 
connect with the road given by the Crocker estate. 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



Good Roads Essay 

In a contest in which nearly 5,000 children all over the 
United States engaged, two girls and a boy, all aged 14, have 
been awarded prizes by Logan Waller Page, director of the 
United States office of public roads, for writing the best essays 
on the repair and maintenance of dirt roads. 

The contest was arranged by Director Page to arouse in- 
terest among school children on the subject of improving the 
public roads of the United States. Page believed that if such a 
contest were started the children would ask questions of their 
parents, and an impetus would be given to the road improve- 
ment. I 

Many of the essays submitted bore evidence of having 
been prepared with the assistance of parents or school teachers 
and these were eliminated. The ablest engineers in the United 
States office of Public Roads acted as a board in passing on 
the essays and in making the decisions. 

The prize winners were : 

First prize, gold medal, Amy Coon, Scammon, Kansas, a 
pupil in the Skidmore school. 

Second prize, Lucille Huff, age 14, Willowdale Farm, Arling- 
ton, Oregon, a pupil in the Arlington school. 

Third prize, Melvin Paulson, aged 14, Bloominy Prairie, 
Minnesota. 

Those receiving honorable mention v/ere : Robert Barros, age 
14,Mansfield Center, Connecticut; George H. Rombough, age 
11, Woodside, Lewis County, Idaho; Maruine Atkinson, age 15, 
Independence, Missouri; Frances Cockran, age 14, Wellman, 
Iowa. 

* * * 

Highway Contracts 

Contracts were let recently by the State Highway Commis- 
sion for the construction of three units of highway, aggregating 
nearly thirty-one miles, and located in Tehama, Yolo and 
Santa Cruz Counties. George Vogelsang, of Tehama, secured 
the contract for the construction of 10.6 miles of State highway 
reaching from the southern boundary of the county to Los Mo- 
linos. A contract was let for the construction of 11.7 miles 
of highway from the southerly boundary of Yolo County to 
Woodland. A company of Los Angeles was granted the con- 
tract to construct 10.3 miles in Santa Cruz County from Glen- 
wood to Santa Cruz. 

* * * 

Watch Bike Cjp 

Motorcop Griffin, between Hollister and San Juan, has been 
waging war on automobile drivers who have neglected to secure 
an operator's license. Under the new State law every person 
who runs a machine must have an operator's license, and these 
licenses are issued free of charge by the Motor Vehicle De- 
partment at Sacramento. 

Many auto owners are in the habit of letting various mem- 
bers of their family or their friends run their cars, and the law 
demands that all who run a car at any time must have a per- 
mit. A number of drivers have been stopped by the traffic 
officer and informed that it will be necessary for them to either 
obtain a license or stop driving. 

* • • 

A Novelty Drive 

A novel way of smoothing a dance floor was instituted at the 
new open air platform owned by Charles Bertholas in Chico 
recently, when a bale of hay tied behind an automobile was 
dragged over the surface. Three men were seated on the bale 
of hay and weighted it down. The automobile traveled at a 
good speed over the floor, and the bale of hay was swung into 
the corners, every board on the floor being smoothed. 

* * * 

Orange County Auto Club 

The Board of Directors of the Automobile Club of Orange 
County held a meeting to complete its permanent organization 
recently in Santa Ana. 

The following officers were elected for the ensuing term : 
Clyde Walker, Santa Ana, president; H. O. Henderson, Ana- 
heim, vice-president; A. S. Ralph, Orange, secretary; and J. R. 
Porter, Orange, treasurer. The other members of the direc- 
torate are J. W. Tubbs, of Santa Ana; A. S. Bradford of Pla- 
centia ; and K. E. Watson of Orange. H. J. Forgy of Santa 
Ana was appointed attorney for the club. 



Arrested for Injuring Highway 

The first arrest for inflicting damage on the new State high- 
way has been made in Fresno. Clarence Boling of Fresno was 
arrested while driving a combined harvester along the State 
highway south of Herdon. He was requested to drive along 
the side of the highway and off the pavement, by Division 
Engineer Woodson, and refused, it is charged. The large 
cleats on the harvester wheels inflicted considerable damage, 
and a complaint was sworn to by the division engineer. 

Harvesters, well drilling and other heavy traction rigs, with 
cleated or rough studded tires, have been driven on the State 
highway in Madera and Santa Clara Counties. Near Los 
Angeles a disc harrow, or some other implement with a sharp 
edge, was driven on the pavement. 

The question is being taken up by the Highway Commission 
throughout the State, and owners of traction engines are asked 
to use care in helping to protect the paved sections of the State 
highway. The Attorney General has given the opinion that the 
State has full power to protect the road, and when the damage 
is wanton or wilfully made it is the intention of the Highway 
Commission to ask for a prosecution. 



Third Exit Out of City 

Plans of the California Highway Commission to give San 
Francisco a third exit of travel to Sacramento and eastern and 
northern points were approved by the State engineering ad- 
visory board recently. 

Orders were given for making a survey of the Napa cut-off 
from Ignacio, which is on the coast route between San Rafael 
and Petaluma, to Napa. 

This link is 24 miles in length and will tie the coast route, 
extending north to Eureka to the Highway extending from 
Napa to Cordelia and thence via Dais to Sacramento. 

The distance from San Francisco, including the ferry trip 
across the bay to Sacramento by this route will be approxi- 
mately 108 miles This route will connect with the Highway 
from Sacramento eastward to Lake Tahoe and the Nevada 
line. It will give the State a bisecting highway from the 
Nevada line to the coast. It will cut off nearly thirty miles as 
compared to the route via Stockton and will make a big saving 
in distance for those who travel south along the coast from 
Eureka, with Sacramento as the objective. 

The other two lines of communication between San Francisco 
and Sacramento now in course of construction by the Highway 
Commission are the Oakland-Benicia route, and the Oakland- 
Stockton route. 

The Oakland-Benicia route, requiring two ferries, one across 
the San Francisco bay and the other at Benicia, will be ninety- 
seven miles in length. The Oakland-Stockton and Sacramento 
route will be 130 miles in length. 



Trinity Highway 

Under J. E. Mitchell of the State Engineer's office, men and 
supplies are now being sent from Red Bluff to the Trinity 
State highway, where extensive improvements, including the 
construction of three concrete bridges, will soon be under way. 

One of the bridges will be built across the south fork of the 
Trinity river, near the Humboldt line, within the next few 
months. This bridge will be only a few miles from the stopping 
place known as Auto Rest. 

The first force, now en route to the scene, consists of 15 
men, 4 wagons and a caterpillar engine. The caterpillar will 
pull two trail wagons and will haul eight or ten tons of cement 
at each trip. 

The work to be done this summer on the highway will make 
it one of the best mountain roads in this section of the State, 
and will open the way for both summer and winter travel. 



Cards for Drivers 

A Sacramento despatch says: "The State Board of Control 
is planning the issuance of small cards as a certificate of the 
possession of an operator's license to drive automobiles, in- 
stead of the large sheet of paper now in use. The card will 
be of a similar size as that of the hunter's license. On the back 
will be printed several of the most important parts of the motor 
vehicle law regarding the operation of the machine." 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere in United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH — 301 California Street 

Telephone Sutter 3010 



San Francisco 



Tips to Automobi lists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garages, hotels and supply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 

SONOMA COUNTY. 

SANTA ROSA — GRAND GARAGE. Under new management. Third 
and Main street, opposite the court house. Phone 166. Finest equipped 
and convenient garage of any in Sonoma County. GEORGE A. ROSS, 
Proprietor. ^__„„ . 

PETALUMA- PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP. Sparks 
& Murphy, Props. Cor. Third and C Sts.; Phone Main 3. Automobiles; 
general machine work and gear cutting; supplies, repairing, auto livery; 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storage batteries. 

SONOMA, CAL. — MISSION GARAGE (Fireproof). Phone Main 741. E. 
W. Gottenberg. Prop. Full line of supplies, vulcanizing, machine shop, 
etc. Expert workmanship only. Service car and auto livery at all 
hours. 

NAPA COUNTY. 

ST. HELENA, CAL.— NAPA VALLEY GARAGE. R. A. Blum, Prop. 
Day phone 1501; night phone 853. Supplies, oils, general repairing. Auto 
livery. Service car at all hours. Expert workmanship only. Agency 
for Mitchell and Ford cars. 

SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
MILPITAS.— AUTO SUPPLIES. Electric welding, 
shop. Expert mechanics. Spangler Brothers 



Complete machine 
Tel. San Jose 2603— R. £. 



PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
owners and their families. Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 

SAN JOSE.— LAMOLLE GRILL. 36-38 North First street. The best 
French dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties 
given particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St.. Tel., P. A. 
333. Auto livery at al! hours. Tires and sundries in stock. Gasoline, oil. 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
BEACH HILL INN. — Location best in Santa Cruz, on crest of Beach 
Hill. 1 block from beach; 2 blocks from Casino; view of sea and moun- 
tain; appointments unique; garage near by. Address MISS A. PORTER. 



Lathe Work. United States or Metric Screw Cut 

Automobile Work a Specialty, American or Foreign Cars 

A Full Line of Parts and Accessories. Also Hand-Made Oil-Tempered 

Springs Always on Hand 

AUTO MACHINE WORKS 



MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 



Phone Franklin 6823 



350 Golden Gate Avenue 
Bat. Hyde and Larkin Sts. 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 

FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Commercial Trucks Automobile 

A Specialty Supplies 

The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF GARAGE WEST OF CHICAGO 




The Oil of Quality 

New York Lubricating 
Company 

516 Second Street 
San Francisco 



Racing Colors for Racers 

Racing colors in the next Indianapolis 500 mile race, it is 
announced, will be uniform, according to the nation which a car 
represents. German machines will thus be white; French, blue; 
English, green; Belgian, yellow; Italian, red; and American 
red and white. This move will do away with the freakish in- 
dividual color combinations which in the past have marred 
speedway racing, and at the same time give bolder relief to 
the international aspect of the sport. Credit for the idea is due 
to E. C. Patterson, the wealthy Chicago sportsman, who had a 
Mercedes, piloted by De Palma. in the last five-century, but 
unfortunately had to withdraw because of excessive motor 

vibration caused by a special aviation model. 
* * * 

Good Money In Racing 

The Indianapolis race winners received: Thomas, Delage, 
$25,000; Duray, Peugeot, $10,000; Guyot, Delage, $5,000; 
Goux, Peugeot, $3,500; Oldfield, Stutz, $3,000; Christiaens, 
Excelsior, $2,200; Grant, Sunbeam, $1,800; Keene, Beaver Bul- 
let, $1,600; Anderson, Stutz, $1,500; Rickenbacher, Duesenberg, 
$1,400. Total, $50,000. In addition to the cash awards of 
$50,000 given by the Indianapolis motor speedway, accessory 
prizes and trophies valued at $35,000, which were offered by 
various automobile concerns, are to be distributed among the 



Sale of Empires 

Clearly demonstrating the great strides being made by the 
light car, the advance made by the Empire Automobile Com- 
pany during the past year is noteworthy. The statement of 
business done during the first six months of 1914 shows that 
three times as many Empires were sold this season as during 
a like period of a year ago. 

This increase in production and sales gives the Empire Com- 
pany first place in point of number of cars built among manu- 
facturers in the great auto producing state of Indiana. 

* * * 

Goodrich New Device 

A new device in the field of big manufacturing has been 
brought out by the B. F. Goodrich Company at its rubber fac- 
tory at Akron, Ohio. This is a pay record card for all em- 
ployees, which also carries a "Safety Bulletin." The pay record 
card is designed to help the employee keep track of the num- 
ber of hours he has worked each day, the amount of piecework 
finished and the daily earnings that result. 

In addition, however, the card carries a safety talk, touching 
on a different topic with each issue, and a new card is "pub- 
lished" each half month. The safety bulletin idea carries out 
the policy of the company, which is making "Safety First" a 
slogan for its employees, as well as the manufacturing prin- 
ciple on which it designs and builds its tires. 

One safety bulletin tells how to care for a certain ailment, the 
next tells what to do to prevent infection of wounds, a succeed- 
ing bulletin will give advice on efficiency, and possibility of in- 
creasing production on piecework, and so on. 

The card, in folder form, is almost like a small, semi-monthly 
publication devoted to the interests of the 15,000 employees 
of the Goodrich Company. It carries the title "Safety, Loyalty 
and Efficiency" at the top, and is put out by W. N. Fitch, mana- 
ger of the Department of Safety and Hygiene, of the Goodrich 
Company. 

* * * 

Steveas-Duryea Top 

Each year there is added to the considered almost perfect 
pleasure motor car some new feature of such importance and 
practicability as to cause every one to say : "Why didn't some 
one think of that before?" 

So it is with one most striking feature embodied in the new 
type of Stevens-Duryea roadster now being marketed by the 
Stevens-Duryea Company. This company is the first to put into 
successful operation and to make practical or serviceable, dur- 
able and attractive top combined with a handsome type of body 
which will allow absolute concealment of the top when low- 
ered. The top is supported by neat, but rigid joints, which 
cause it always to follow a certain path in folding into and 
being withdrawn from the body. It is self-supporting, and 
when up requires no braces of any kind, being rigidly fastened 
in front to the windshield supports. 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



Roads to Tahoe 

The tour to Lake Tahoe is now at its best, is the report just 
received by R. L. Sargeant, of the Fisk Rubber Company. O. 
B. Parkinson, of Stockton, who went over the wishbone route 
over the "Fourth" says: 

"We made the up trip via Auburn, Gold Run, Emigrant Gap 
and Truckee, and we found that the best route to the lake, 
although it is somewhat longer. The road is a boulevard from 
Stockton to Sacramento, and on through, until the summit is 
almost reached. Up to a week ago Thursday, the road from the 
snowsheds on was almost impassable, except to those autoists 
who do stunts, but it is now exceptionally good. A gang of 
workmen have made a cut through a big snowbank which cov- 
ered the road as you run down to Donner Lake. The cut was 
made the day before we arrived. You can drive through the 
cut for a distance of 200 feet and grab snow by reaching out 
of your car. 

"The scenery around Donner Lake is now at its best. We 
drove on to Truckee and to Tahoe Tavern. From the tavern we 
made the trip around the lake to Tallac over that new State 
road. The man who drives has little opportunity to look at 
the scenery. The road is good, but it is narrow and winding. 
Should one fall from the car he might be hurt. However, 
any driver who is used to the mountains, and who has a mod- 
ern car can make any of the grades without a particle of diffi- 
culty. We made the 19 mile trip from McKinneys to Tallac in 
an hour and a half. On the return via Placerville, I counted 100 
machines on the road between Phillips Station and Placerville. 
That didn't take into account the scores of machines which 
stopped at the various resorts. Near Donner Lake the State 
Highway Commission is working on a new piece of road which 
will cut out the steep and somewhat dangerous grade crossing 
the railroad tracks. The new road will go under the railroad 
instead of over it. It will be open in another month." 



New Jeffery Dealers 

Two important additions to the dealers' organization of the 
Jeffery Company were made during the past week when the 
announcement was made of the appointment of the Frank C. 
Riggs Company of Portland, Ore., as Jeffery distributors for 
that State, and of McArthur Brothers of Phoenix, Arizona, 
as Jeffery distributors for Arizona. Both have attained 
success as Packhard dealers in their respective territories. 

Frank C. Riggs is widely known in the industry; he former- 
ly occupied the position of Vice-President and Sales Manager 
of the Fisk Rubber Company. 



Light Jeffery Six 

A light six for 1915 has been formally announced by the 
Thomas B. Jeffery Company of Kenosha, Wisconsin. 

The Jeffery four-cylinder car, having a motor that is in the 
nature of a small high speed type, will be continued without 
change. The success of the French designed motors of this 
type has been most striking, which has also been seen in the 
wonderful performances of the Jeffery car the last season. 

The new light six will be a revelation in its line, embodying 
unusual features for a car of its type and price. The factory 
officials have promised that this car will be as striking and in- 
teresting as was the four-cylinder Jeffery. The present Jeffery 
six will be continued, the new models will have many additions 
in refinements, equipment and luxurious features. 

* * * 

Woman and Auto 'Bus 

"Down in New Jersey, 'The Woman with the Green Veil' has 
routed the business and political bosses of Mendam, who op- 
posed her establishment of a 'bus line connecting it with Mor- 
ristown, and has ended by obtaining a contract from the gov- 
ernment for the transportation of the United States mail," says 
H. D. McCoy, of Chanslor & Lyon Company, agents for the 
Motz tires. 

" T was seriously handicapped, at first, by tire troubles,' 
writes Mrs. Agnes A. Maher, the woman in question, who oper- 
ates her own 'bus. 'I made my own repairs, and it seemed as 
though I were forever down on my knees in the road 'tinker- 
ing tires' — that is, until I equipped my 'bus with Motz High 
Efficiency Cushion tires.' " 



MACHINE WORK 
EJLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 



J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM, 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



ED. F. HENDRICKS 
Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave. 
At Gough St., San Francisco 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

FRANCIS BROS., Managers 
NEW ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF GARAGE 



PHONE 
PROSPECT 1915 



1120 POST STREET 

Near Van Ness Avenue 



I Make Sure of Your 

Comfort 

Truffault - ffarlford 

SHOCK ABSORBER 

"The Pioneer and The Best" 

Everywhere you motor you see the 
Truffault-Hartford Shock Absorber 
on car after car. Their owners ride 
comfortably — save steadily on tires 
and repairs — avoid broken springs 
and axles. But why let them have 
all the comfort and economy ? 

Equip your car today with the Truf- 
fault-Hartford. the time tried essential to 
motoring enjoyment. The only shock absorber 
made that gives you the gentle-but-steady 
spring control of fractional resistance. 
So far superior to other devices in both prin- 
ciple and practice that the makers of not less 
than twenty five of the country's leading 
cars have made It an integral part of their 
equipment. Make it part of yours. 

Four models, J16. — $3S . — *50. — *60. 
Can be fitted to any car. Send for Catalog 
— today. 
Insist Upon Tnilfaoll-Harlfords on Yonr New Cir 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION CO. 

EDWARD V. HARTFORD. Pr«. 
Office and Works:174BajSt.,Jer8eyCity,N.J. 

Manufacturers of Hinford Eltclric 
Starting and Lighting System 

DISTRIBUTORS 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 



Portland Oakland 
San Francisco 



Los Angeles Seattle 
Spokane Fresno 





22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 



Overland Victory 

"The Victory of the Overland car at Visalia has added an- 
other victory to the list already achieved by this popular car," 
says A. R. Theisen, treasurer of J. W. Leavitt & Co., distribu- 
tors for the Overland car on the Pacific Coast. 

"Few realize what this victory means, inasmuch that the con- 
test was held over the ordinary country road, and not over 
a highway especially prepared. The contest was full of local 
rivalry, and the different sections represented by the entries 
backed their favorites to the limit of their purses. We have 
just received a letter from C. H. Cobb, who owns the Over- 
land which Tom McKelvy drove to first place. Cobb writes : 

"This course was 3 1-8 miles long, with four square corners, 
the straightaway was 1 1-16 miles and the ends were one-half 
mile across, so you can see it was very difficult to make fast 
time, and McKelvy certainly did some good driving. He passed 
the Packard in the fourth lap, which was considered his strong- 
est competitor, and from that on he led the race until the finish, 
defeating the National, which was his nearest contender by two 
minutes; his time was 2 hours and 46 minutes, an average of a 
little over 54 miles per hour, which was very good considering 
the course. We got quite a bunch of Packard money on the 
side, as Visalia was backing the Packard very strong, and we 
took all the money we could get on the Overland. There was 
in the race three Nationals, Mercer, Pope-Hartford, Packard, 
two 40 Buicks, and a number of other cars of less importance, 
a total of fifteen in all." 



Kissel Trucks 

"I have driven my three ton Kissel Kar truck more than 15,- 
000 miles, and never yet had a breakdown," says L. G. Good- 
rich of Fresno, California. To which John H. Eagal, of the Kis- 
sel Kar, adds : 

"That is good news, but Mr. Goodrich's recital of some of 
the things his truck has done is the astonishing part of it. He 
admits that the truck has carried seven tons at one time, and 
several other times he has hauled four or five tons over eight 
miles of dirt roads. A truck that will stand up continuously 
for 15,000 miles under such service needs no qualifying word." 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging. 
Kodak, etc. You will be Interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phones—Franklin 1184. Home C 4084. 



CLASS A GARAGE, Inc. 

Particular Service to Out of Town Motorists 
"CLUB" Service Our Specialty 

735-751 Post Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2280 



When you have a party at your home you will give your 

friends a better time by treating them to a real old-fashioned 
Kentucky cocktail, made with "Old Forester" whisky. 



REPUBLIC 
STAGGARD TREAD 

Quality Tires for 
Quality People 

REPUBLIC RUBBER CO., of Cal. 



295 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



M0T0R0L 



''It suits because it doesn't soot' 



If you want to prolong; the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 

If you want to reduce your oil 
expense, 

Uae M0T0R0L 

Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



"HOOVER" 

AUXILIARY SPRING & 

SHOCK. ABSORBER 



Full factory equipment on all Pack- 
ard!, Oldsmoblles, Coles, Thomas and 
Saven ethers. Absolutely perfect. 
Full set of four— $14 to $18. Under 
compression by heavy loads, rough 
roads or bumps. Under all conditions 
rides as easy as on asphalt. Impos- 
sible to break springs. No competition 
HOOVER SPRING CO. 



617 Turk St.. 



San Francisco 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 
Pacific Coast Agents 
637-39-41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich £ Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-347 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 



VULCANIZING 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market 6370 

42 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 

L. H. & B. I. BILL 

643 Golden Qate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



July 18, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




IN9VMCB 




// I v« 



At the Insurance Congress recently held at Los Angeles, the 
following resolutions were adopted : 

"Whereas, The people of the great State of California need 
and are entitled to as sound and conservative laws governing 
all forms of insurance as has so many States, 

"And whereas, The people and those representing the busi- 
ness are not properly protected by the laws now on our statute 
books, 

"Be it resolved by this Congress, That we are in favor of 
such corrective legislation as will safeguard our people, and 
hereby pledge our support to such legislation, and further, we 
appeal to those in authority to interest themselves in this 
legislation, having to do with the welfare of so many of our 
people, and also to our business, which holds so great potentiali- 
ties for the good of the home and general business interests of 
California. 

"The thanks of this body are hereby offered to the daily and 
insurance press for the kindly interest and space which has 
been given to the activities of the Insurance Congress of South- 
ern California. The influence of the press is always appre- 
ciated by insurance men who see in its co-operation a valuable 
aid to the fulfillment of the mission in which this body is en- 
gaged. 

"Whereas, The Panama-Pacific International Exposition has 
signally honored the underwriting business of the world by 
placing it on the same basis as the other arts and industries 
which contribute to the happiness and welfare of mankind by 
appointing a commissioner to have charge of the World's In- 
surance Congress events, and 

"Whereas, President C. C. Moore has recognized this Insur- 
ance Congress, the first to be held in the United States, by 
sending Commissioner W. L. Hathaway here as his personal 
representative, 

"Be it therefore resolved, That this Congress does hereby 
pledge its loyal and continuous support to the Exposition and 
the World's Insurance Congress, and we also urge that every 
individual engaged in the insurance business assist the com- 
mission in charge of the World's Insurance Congress in ce- 
menting the insurance influences of the nation together for such 
purposes as shall benefit the public and conserve their interests. 

"Be it finally resolved, That this Congress extend its sincere 
thanks to those who participated in the program, and whose 
efforts aided to make this Congress a conspicuous success, and 
to those who have striven so ably and unselfishly to promote 
and carry this gathering to its final success. 

"That we appreciate their efforts and labors, and shall al- 
ways bear in mind with gratefulness their service in our behalf 
which has and will redound to the great benefit of all the lines 

of legitimate insurance." 

* * » 

In a report covering the first six months of its existence, the 
compensation insurance department of California finds itself 
in possession of a balance of nearly $300,000, of which a legis- 
lative appropriation of $100,000 has been maintained intact. 
The net premiums written during this period between January 
1st and June 30th, amounted to $379,450. The net represents 
the amount of premiums after deducting premiums returned 
and cancelled. There were received 4,417 applications, rep- 
resenting the number of California employers who elect to 
insure their workmen under the provisions of the State law. Of 
the premiums paid, $181,371 have been actually earned. Against 
the earned premiums there is a total claim liability, including 
the items of compensation paid, medical expenses and the esti- 
mated cost of claims in course of settlement, that totals $67,- 
122.38. This is about 37 per cent of the earned premiums. 
The entire operating expense for the six months, including the 

furniture and fixtures and supplies accounts was $31,666. 

• « • 

The San Francisco brokerage firm of C. B. Sloan & Co. has 
been charged by the Pacific Board with accepting excess com- 
missions in connection with the placing of the Sperry Flour 
line controlled by them. 



On August 28th, the fire chiefs of the Pacific Coast will meet 
at the Exposition grounds to witness a special demonstration 
of fire fighting apparatus and the high pressure system intro- 
duced in San Francisco since the year of the great conflagration. 
The exhibition will be under the auspices of the World's Insur- 
ance Congress Events Committee. The system installed for 
the Exposition is considered the finest and most modern in the 
world, and will form part of the exhibit of the American La 
France Company. All the fire stations on the grounds have 
been completed, and a company of nine men with five pieces of 
motor fire apparatus is at present occupying the headquarters 
station at the Fillmore street entrance. 

* * * 

The Industrial Accident Commission announces that in order 
to assist employers and insurance companies easily to rate the 
permanent disabilities of their injured workmen, a set of tables 
for free distribution has been prepared. The records and ex- 
perience of other compensation commissions, both in the United 
States and Europe, and opinions of medical authorities through- 
out the world, have been obtained and carefully considered. 
Conferences have been held with thousands of individual em- 



Fire and Automobile Insurance 

Ample Facilities for Handling Large Lines 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

WILLIAMSBURGH CITY FIRE INS. CO. - Organized 1853 

MERCHANTS FIRE ASSURANCE CORPORATION, Organized 1910 
UNITED STATES FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, Organized 1824 
NEW BRUNSWICK FIRE INSURANCE CO. - Organized 1826 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE CO. - - Organized 1822 

WM. W. ALVERSON, Manager 

374 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

SPECIAL AGENTS 

R. R. ROPER, San Francisco A. M. LOVELACE, Portland 

T. J. KELEHER, Loi Angele. W. T. BOOTH, Spokane 



1863 



1914 



FIFTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets, $10,000,000 



FIRE 



MARINE AUTOMOBILE 



California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 
(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance. Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Miller. President: L. B. Hoge. General Manager Accident an 
Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building. San Francisco 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

CHARTERED 1850 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

The Insurance Exchange, San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager Guy Francis, Asst. Manager 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. GAL 

A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid Ina 
laws of California, Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 18, 1914 



ployers, with a score of employers' associations, and with more 
than two hundred trades unions, while the characteristics of 
various industries and of over fourteen hundred occupations 
have been studied and classified. The Industrial Accident 
Commission of California has formally adopted this rating 
schedule as its guide in determining the amount of compensa- 
tion due workingmen who are permanently disabled, and will 
iollow it in all cases except where convincing evidence is in- 
troduced to the contrary. Under the Workmen's Compen- 
sation Act, employees who lose an eye or a foot or some other 
part of their body, are compensated in accordance with the 

percentage of their disability. 

» * » 

Commissioner Turner, of the department of public health and 
safety, will ask $503,041 for the maintenance of the Oakland 
fire department for the fiscal year 1914-15, in the incoming 
year's budget, approximating $140,000 more than the depart- 
ment was allowed last year. Improvements are contemplated 
for the Piedmont district, a drill tower for the East Oakland 
district, hydrants and additional men made necessary by a re- 
cent ordinan; e giving firemen one day off in every five. 

* * * 

A new intersurance exchange is being organized in San Fran- 
cisco, to be known as the Mine Owners' Casualty Indemnity 
Exchange, for the purpose of insuring compensation and lia- 
bility risks of California mines. L. C. Fraser, Jr., and E. J. 
Mitchell are to be the managers and attorneys. The question 
to be determined is whether the mines in operation will offer a 
sufficiently large experience to permit good underwriting even 

if all should insure. 

* * * 

Julian Sonntag, vice-president of the West Coast Life, and 
F. L. Hoffman, statistician of the Prudential, have been named 
by George B. Scott, chairman of the World's Insurance Con- 
gress committee on participation and attendance of industrial 

insurance companies, to serve with him. 

* * * 

A. G. Crane, formerly with the Great Republic Life of Los 
Angeles, has joined the forces of the West Coast Life as 

agency director at San Francisco. 

* * * 

Secretary W. H. Brown and Actuary Walter I. King, of the 
Columbian National Life, have been visiting the principal 
coast agencies of their company during the past two weeks. 



SUMMER ACTIVITIES AT SANTA CRUZ. 

There have been good years and bad years at Santa Cruz, 
but the present one appears, in point of numbers and general 
enjoyability, to be one of the best for many years. The cruiser 
Marblehead left port Sunday morning bound for San Francisco 
after a most enjoyable stay, and every one is now looking for- 
ward to the visit of the torpedo boat flotilla which it is thought 
may drop in any day. There is something about the visits of 
these warships that makes them most enjoyable; the girls 
would probably say it was because of the young officers, and 
that is probably so. 

The weather continues almost perfect, not hot, but just the 
right shade of coolness so acceptable to our friends in the hot 
interior. 

The plunge and the surf, the scenic railway and the Hippo- 
drome vie with the grill and ballroom in point of popularity, 
while the unsurpassed golf links has its devotees by the hun- 
dreds. The Santa Cruz Beach band and Eagle's orchestra are 
better this year than ever before, and the addition to the band 
of Miss Marion Street, the girl with the wonderful voice, has 
made an additional pleasure to music lovers. 

Our Philippine cousins, the Igorotes, continue to be the cen- 
ter of attraction in their village on the lower board walk, many 
seeing these interesting natives of our new possessions for the 
first time. The salmon are running in the bay at the present 
time, numbers of them being taken every day, some of the 
specimens running from 30 to 35 pounds, and believe me, when 
you have a 30-pound salmon at the end of a rod and reel, you 
have some fish. 

The people from the valleys were late getting in this year 
on account of the heavy crops, but now every in-coming train 
is crowded with happy visitors, parents and eager kiddies, 
anxious to get away from the hot weather at home, and enjoy 
the cool sea breezes at Santa Cruz. 



OBITUARY. 
Charles A. Hooper. 

Charles Appleton Hooper a pioneer lumber man and the 
owner of extensive timber property in this State, died last Sun- 
day, at his residence, the Rancho Los Medanos in Contra Costa 
County. 

Death was due to nephritis complicated by heart disease. 
Hooper was seventy-one years of age, and was born in Bangor, 
Me., where he had his early training in the lumber trade. 
When the civil war broke out Hooper resigned his position to 
enlist, at the age of eighteen, in the Forty-third Massachusetts 
Volunteers. After serving the Union cause for one year he 
was discharged, and in 1863 he made his way across the plains 
to California. 

Hooper's destination was Amador County, where his father, 
John Hooper, had founded the town of Plymouth. Hooper for 
about a year worked in the Plymouth mine for his father, who 
had reached California in 1851. 

In 1865 Hooper came to San Francisco and established the 
firm of C. A. Hooper & Co., at 4th and Townsend streets, on 
the site where a new Southern Pacific depot now is being 
built. Here for several years he did a thriving business 
supplying lumber to the city and country districts around San 
Jose and up the rivers tributary to the bay. 

About 1867, Hooper took in William Lockerman as a part- 
ner, under the firm name of Hooper & Lockerman. At the end 
of two years, however, he bought Lockerman out, and the 
business went under the old name once more. In 1869, 
Hooper's brother, George William Hooper, became a member 
of the firm, which since then has been gradually enlarged into 
a wholesale and manufacturing business. 

Hooper organized many lumber companies, and invested 
heavily in California lands, ranches and timber tracts, in which 
he expressed great confidence. The flourishing town of Pitts- 
burg, at Los Medanos, Contra Costa County, was founded by 
Hooper. 

Hooper's ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War. His 
maternal grandfather, John Perry, Jr., established the first Sun- 
day-school in the United States in 1811 at Brunswick, Me. 

On June 7, 1880, at Brownsville, Me., Hooper married Miss 
Ida Geneva Snow, who survives him. He also is survived by 
two daughters, Mrs. Wiggington E. Creed of Piedmont, and 
Mrs. Sumner Crosby, of Alameda; eight grandchildren, a 
brother, John A. Hooper of San Francisco, and a sister, Mrs. 
W. E. Norwood, of San Francisco. 



BOOK NOTES. 



For Lovers of Cats. — Among the books announced for fall 
publication by Paul Elder & Company, San Francisco, is "The 
Great Small Cat and Others," by May E. Southworth — seven 
tales in which the leading parts are assumed by feline heroes 
and heroines; their true adventures being told in a sympathetic 
manner that will appeal to all cat lovers. The book is to be il- 
lustrated with mounted duotone prints and attractively printed 
and bound. 

Inspiration. — The "Impressions Calendar," which for many 
years has been annually welcomed by an appreciative audi- 
ence, is to be issued for this year, 1915, by Paul Elder & Co., 
San Francisco. The fifty-four leaves display selections from 
those authors who most felicitously voice modern thought, with 
decorations designed by Harold Sichel, printed in varied com- 
bination of exquisite color tones. The calendar is remarkable 
for its beauty and the interest and charm of its contents and its 
extremely moderate price. 

Nature Essays. — Stanton Davis Kirkham's delightful volume, 
"In the Open," is to be issued by Paul Elder & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, in a new Sweetbriar Edition, to be bound in a semi- 
flexible buckram that will be found ideal should the nature 
lover wish to carry the book with him out under the trees. 



The Unbeliever (after the spiritualist seance) — Surely 

you don't believe that the spirit of your dead husband upset all 
that furniture ? The Widow — Well, I don't know. George was 
dreadfully clumsy. — Sydney Bulletin. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




%: 



TV tt« 



IF ONE CAN DO IT— WHY NOT ALL OF US! 





Records by 

oan Sawyer's 

wn Persian Orchestra 

UGUST-1914 



JUST OUT! 

THE AUGUST 
LIST or 

Columbia 

Double-Disc 

Records 



Including first selections by Otillie Metzger, the eminent German 
contralto, who sings selections from her chief operatic successes; two 
famous Italian songs by Carolina White; two Pavlowa dances, recorded 
exactly as danced by the world's greatest dancer; six of the latest modern 
dances recorded under the supervision of G. Hepburn Wilson; twelve of 
the latest song hits; the two real vocal hits from Sari. 

Other selections, both vocal and instrumental, are recorded by the 
Columbia Light Opera Company, Louis Kriedler, Prince's Band, Henry 
Burr, Manuel Romain, Charles W. Harrison, Peerless Quartette, Ada 
Jones, Ed. Morton, Collins & Harlan, Billy Watkins, Williams College 
Glee Club and the Afro-American Folk Song Singers. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — All Columbia records will play on 
Victor talking machines. Likewise all Columbia Grafonolas 
will play Victor records. 

Columbia Graphophone Company 

334 Sutter Street, San Francisco 



Columbia Dealers Everywhere 





tsUHUhU July to. r&M 



TER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 





Vol. lxxxvui 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, July 25, 1914 



No. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mall matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Geo. Hische, 1310 Westminster, Westminster Building, 
Chicago. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England. 

Matter Intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.26. 
Foreign — 1 year, $6.00; 6 months,, $3.26. 



There are thirty-two — count 'em — candidates for Con- 
gress. 

Fashion Note — The more style she puts on the more she 

takes off. 

Sacramento is a prosperous island entirely surrounded 

by busted corporations. 

Yosemite has a new waterfall one thousand feet high, 

but it can only be seen through a telescope. 

Dear old London has been hit by the slogan fad, and 

George Bernard Shaw suggests, "Hell is a city much like 
London." 

Sacramento tries to feel cool with the thermometer at 

101, by reflecting that at Red Bluff it was 104 in the shade. 
Hot comfort. 

"General" Kelly, sometime commander of the unem- 
ployed, is still serving a term for vagrancy in Sacramento, but 
his army is marching on. 

Professor Merle Thorpe, lecturing on journalism at the 

University of California summer school, in answer to the ques- 
tion, "Can a newspaper tell the truth?" offers 57 different rea- 
sons for his answer in the negative. 

One reads that Madeline, a sequestered little village in 



Lassen County, is trying hard to locate a pretty school-ma'am 
who can play the piano as well as instruct in the three "R's." 
Decidedly, Lassen is getting on the map. Three months ago 
Most of us could not say offhand whether the county was in 
Canada or the United States. 

-On with the dance. When the calliopes on the excursion 



steamers play tango music the two hundred girls employed at 
the Mississippi Pearl Button Company refuse to work, and this 
is the grievance at the bottom of an injunction suit brought in 
Iowa asking for damages for loss of the services of their em- 
ployees made dancing mad by the steamer music. 

Some statistical fiend figures that three billion grass- 
hoppers have been caught this season in Siskiyou County, ac- 
cording to reports from the most northern section of the State 
These insects covered the fields for many miles, and destroyed 
grains and fruit crops. By way of rubbing it in, the fiend adds 
that if these insects were placed in single file they would make 
a line 47,350 miles long. 



Mrs. Niver, of the Pennsylvania board of censors for 

moving pictures, has decided that a kiss is a yard long. Mrs. 
Niver was censoring a film depicting a young man in the act 
of kissing his sweetheart. The pair clung and hung and hung 
and clung until five yards of film had been exhausted. It was 
then Mrs. Niver ordered the smack reduced by four yards, 
leaving three feet of kiss remaining. Here we have the arith- 
metic of osculation measuring bliss with a yard-stick. 

Senator Works has introduced a bill which proposes to 

treat the tip as an incident of interstate commerce, and a crimi- 
nal law at that. According to the measure, if it becomes the 
law in its original form, it will be a violation of the law and an 
offense against the common weal to give as well as to accept a 
tip, provided that the transaction is all in the way of interstate 
commerce or travel. What queer things you meet when you 
don't have a gun. 

An old controversy is current in Palo Alto concerning 

a proposition to cut down the trees that line some of the streets 
of that picturesque little town. The question has been raised 
because an automobile owner threatens to sue the city for dam- 
ages to himself and his machine by reason of the fact that one 
of the trees hid the light of a road car coming the other way. 
The city council passes the buck by referring the question 
to vote at the next election. 

The political editor of a San Francisco morning paper 

asks the question: "Does Mrs. Charles F. McCarthy of San 
Mateo seek to be an assemblyman or an assemblywoman?" 
The question is promptly answered by Miss Eleanor Falvey, 
chief deputy County Clerk of San Mateo, by recording Mrs. 
McCarthy's nominating petition as neither assemblyman nor 
assemblywoman, but as "member of the assembly from the 
42d district." This might be described as a circumlocutory 
judgment. 

One hears from New York that the woman who wears 

a short coat in the early season will be in fashion, and the 
woman who later in the winter puts on a longer one will also 
be in style. This is the decision reached by members of the 
United Cloak, Suit and Skirt Manufacturers' Association, and 
so far as they are concerned the question as to the length of 
the smart woman's cloak, which has been agitating the trade 
for some time, is settled. Now why should the women take 
orders from their dressmakers? 

The rival press agents are counting noses and inciden- 
tally calling each other liars over their disputes concerning 
the attendance at the political meetings of their several chiefs. 
This is the most futile and beguiling form of arithmetic, as 
everybody knows who has watched the course of politics in 
past campaigns. Curiosity is not conviction, and the press 
agents forget that the whole town would turn out to see a can- 
didate hanged where a paltry score would hesitate about going 
to hear him talk through his hat. 



The peck of trouble in store for 
Lots of Work California electors at the coming 

For Voters. genera! election in the shape of the 

multifarious direct legislation pro- 
pounded on referendum, has inspired some outside sympathy 
for the bewildered voter who is called upon to digest the merits 
of the Lord knows how many intricate questions. So the 
Springfield Republican extends its best Massachusetts con- 
sideration, and hopes for a prosperous delivery in spite of the 
bewilderment dished up to be swallowed by California in 
November. Thus, "it was lately predicted from the rate at 
which initiative amendments to the constitution of California 
were being prepared that the people of that State would have 
at least 100 propositions to vote upon next November, in ad- 
dition to selecting candidates for the senatorial, congressional, 
State and county tickets. It goes without saying that the aver- 
age voter will not before going to the polls spend the time 
needed to master 100 legislative proposals, some of them im- 
portant, complicated and dubious. It is equally obvious that 
in the few minutes occupied in marking a ballot the average 
voter cannot intelligently pass upon the merits of 100 separate 
proposals, some of which might properly engross a great part 
of a legislative session. If everybody voted, as some re- 
formers would compel everybody to do under penalty, the 
result would be worthless, because it would represent no real 
thinking. As a matter of fact, what will happen is that the 
great majority of the voters will give it up as hopeless and ex- 
press no opinion at all. Very likely the opinion expressed by 
those who do vote on these questions will be more intelligent 
than the average, but it can hardly be said to have the force 
of a majority vote, which is the very basis of the demand for 
legislation by initiative." 

It is not quite so bad as all that yet. We have not kept tally 
on the recent additions to the forthcoming electoral troubles, 
but at a guess it might be reasonable to put down the tale of 
submitted propositions at something less than fifty. It will be 
great fun for the tired business man to sit down and study the 
official and unofficial controversies over the half-hundred ref- 
erenda submitted for his wisdom to pass on or pass up. We 
hope he will do his duty. 

W 
State Controller Chambers takes a 
Pressure for gloomy view of the future, so far as 

Higher Taxes. it is concerned with the State reve- 

nue system, and he foresees the 
need of new and higher taxes to meet the expenditures of the 
commonwealth, which this year amount to the enormous sum 
of $14,908,900. Mr. Chambers has issued a statement fore- 
casting State revenue results, in which he says : 

"But what of the future? California is a rapidly growing 
State, and her requirements increase accordingly. The pres- 
ent system of taxation has worked well to date. Abundant 
revenue to meet demands has been provided. But how long 
will this continue? Let alone, it might prove sufficient for 
many years. But it has not been let alone, and the indications 
are many that it never will be. 

"By legislative enactment, we will lose after June 30th next 
the corporation license tax, amounting to over $8000 a year. 
In November, the voters will be called upon to decide whether 
to keep or to abandon the poll tax, involving nearly $850,000 
annually. Beyond that, constitutional amendments will be sub- 
mitted to the people to exempt from taxation certain educa- 



tional institutions and ships of over a specified tonnage. And 
so it goes, has gone and will continue to go. 

"In the meantime, as those abandonments and exemptions 
are sought, the demand increases for more money, and then 
more money, for this purpose and for that. As we cut off at 
one end, we ask more at the other. . . . All of which served 
to emphasize the need of looking about for new sources of 
revenue. Either that, or we must put a stop to abandonments 
and exemptions and discourage new occasions for expenditures, 
even though meritorious. We cannot continue to abandon such 
things as franchise licenses and poll taxes, to exempt churches, 
universities and so on from taxation, to vote free text books 
and other things for the good of the people, and yet make both 
ends meet under a system of taxation that already appears to 
be nearly pressed to the limit." 

It is a melancholy tale of extravagance that Mr. Chambers 
relates. Indeed, the State administration political machine, 
which is just now working overtime, will scarcely thank the 
Controller for calling attention to the manner in which they 
have been burning the candle at both ends, at the cost of the 
taxpayers, for salaries must be paid and grease provided for 
the machine. 



No more useful work is done in the 
Increasing the way of conserving and increasing 

Food Supply. the food supply than that of the 

Fish and Game Commission in 
planting salmon in the Sacramento River, but the results of this 
work have hitherto been greatly limited by the loss and waste 
of the young fish. Now the Commission is engaged on a series 
of experiments to demonstrate if possible that salmon can be 
hatched near the bay and liberated close to salt water, so that 
the high per centage of loss of small fish in the long trip down 
the river could be avoided. 

Every pumping plant and irrigation ditch taking water from 
the river yearly destroys thousands of young salmon, while 
the larger fish of the rivers devour many. 

Large numbers of the small fish yearly lose themselves in 
the overflow and die, as the water dries them up when they 
are caught in shallow pools. 

To save this loss, which is known to be enormous as a result 
of careful examination of the irrigating systems and overflow, 
it was decided to find a method, if possible, of releasing the 
fry nearer salt water. 

Three years ago, 50,000 salmon were liberated at Sisson, 50,- 
000 more at Benicia, and a third batch of 50,000 were freed 
just below Sacramento. Each group of salmon were marked 
in a particular way by the removal of small fins, so that the fish 
experts could tell accurately where they came from. 

Now the Fish Commission reports that one of the marked 
salmon liberated at Benicia has been caught in Monterey Bay, 
and another fish of the Sacramento contingent has been cap- 
tured in the same waters. 

The deduction made from these results is, that the young 
salmon can be safely liberated in tidewater. Whether they 
can be hatched close to the point of liberation is as yet un- 
certain, but the results of an experiment of this kind made near 
Sacramento were not very encouraging. Probably the tempera- 
ture of the water was not suitable. But in any event the salmon 
fry hatched in the mountains can be transported in cars to 
the point of liberation on tidewater. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



Among other propositions submitted 
To Raise the on referendum to the popular vote 

Cost of Living. at the coming election there is this : 

"Any employer who shall require or 
permit, or who shall suffer or permit any overseer, superin- 
tendent, foreman or other agent of said employer, to require or 
permit any person in his employ to work more than eight hours 
in one day, or more than forty-eight hours in one week, except 
in cases of extraordinary emergency caused by fire, flood or 
danger to life or property, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and under conviction thereof shall be fined not less than $50 nor 
more than $500, or imprisonment in the county jail not less 
than ten days nor more than ninety days, or both such fine and 
imprisonment." 

This is a stiff dose in the way of restrictive legislation. It 
will be observed that there is absolutely no provision for over- 
time in the proposition. No matter what may be the emergency 
of business or manufacturing industry, the men must quit the 
minute the clock strikes, or the employer goes to jail. 

This arbitrary and unreasonable law would simply put the 
farmer out of business, or in the alternative would greatly en- 
hance the cost of living already so burdensome. The necessary 
effect of the proposed law on agricultural industry would be to 
limit production and shorten the food supply. The measure is 
designed to help the labor element under a mistaken sense that 
a man can lift himself up by hauling on his bootstraps. The 
certain result of this measure, if enacted, must be to raise the 
cost of living so that the purchasing power of wages will be 
lowered. It is the remorseless law of trade that if you increase 
the cost of production the price of the product must be raised. 
Otherwise production will stop. 



Some people like to play with fig- 
A Meal of Figures. ures. They have a confirmed ap- 

petite for statistics and will eat 
them up. To people of that kind there is no more interesting 
document than the "Statistical Abstract of the United States" 
for the year 1913. From its sober pages one learns that in 
the basic elements of economic progress the United States 
ranks high among the nations of the world, being one of only 
five countries having an area in excess of three million square 
miles, and the only nation of the Western world (except Rus- 
sia) having a population of over 100 million. In the inter- 
change of products among its own people it leads the world, 
its home trade at the present time being estimated at nearly 
40 billion dollars, or equal to the international exchange of the 
world, and approximately ten times the value of our own for- 
eign trade now valued at four billion dollars. 

That our present foreign trade is far short of its immediate 
possibilities is evident from a consideration of its area, com- 
merce and other economic factors in comparison with that of 
other leading countries, as set forth in comparative tables pub- 
lished in the "Statistical Abstract of the United States, 1913," 
compiled by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 
Thus the present export trade of the United States (two and 
one-half billion dollars) represents about $25 per capita. A 
per capita basis equal to that of Argentina would raise the ex- 
ports of the United States to five billion dollars; and one equal 
to that of Belgium would bring its exports to ten billion dollars 
a year; while our aggregate foreign trade, when upon a per 
capita basis as large as that of Canada, would be considerably 
over thirteen million a year. 

Other comparative tables in the "Statistical Abstract" further 
emphasize the commercial power of the United States and its 
strong international position. In railway mileage, for exam- 



ple, we possess one-third of the world's total, our 258,000 miles 
being ten times as much as the mileage of the United Kingdom, 
and six times that of Germany. The Western Union Company 
alone has 238,000 miles of telegraph lines, or double the total 
in Russia, next in order. More than one-third of the world's 
mail service is performed upon routes located in the United 
States, while our public debt of one billion dollars is smaller 
than that of Italy, Austria-Hungary, Spain, Germany, Austra- 
lia, Japan, British India, or Great Britain, and is less than 
one-sixth that of France, and one-fourth that of Russia. 

If this meal of figures does not sate your appetite, more 
can be had by asking the Department of Commerce in Wash- 
ington to supply the book and fountain of statistical lore. 



Wilson's Wise 
Mexican Policy. 



3»- 

The elimination of Huerta was slow 
in coming, but its arrival makes 
possible the pacification of Mexico, 
and approves the wisdom of Presi- 
dent Wilson's Mexican policy. Ever since the beginning of the 
Mexican revolutionary troubles, certain large American inter- 
ests, holding concessions and other property in that country, 
have labored and exerted pressure to compel intervention by 
the United States. It is to the credit of the President that he 
has been strong enough to withstand this pressure, and save his 
country from the horrors and cost of a foreign war. Not only 
is the President's policy approved insofar as he has resisted 
the selfish clamor for the invasion of Mexico, but he has be- 
sides vastly improved our relations with the great Latin repub- 
lics of South America by his mediation policy. The moral 
position of the United States has been strengthened not only 
in Mexico, but in Latin America, because the mediation con- 
ference has demonstrated that the United States does not seek 
territorial aggrandizement in Mexico. A palpable chance to 
begin a war of conquest was deliberately thrown away when 
President Wilson, refusing to accept that form of unlimited in- 
tervention, embodied in the Lodge resolution, and pressed upon 
him by the minoiity in Congress, when Vera Cruz was seized, 
rigorously restricted the scope of the reprisal, held the army in 
check, and turned promptly to welcome the good offices of the 
A. B. C. powers. The wisdom of the President's policy in re- 
jecting the intervention policy of the minority in Congress 
seems thoroughly vindicated. 



The Stockton Merchants, Manufacturers and Employers' 

Association has issued the following statement in relation to 
the labor troubles in that town : "We notice that the labor 
leaders deny that the statements made to the fact that union 
painters are painting non-union lumber; we wonder if the labor 
leaders will deny that union carpenters are not scabbing on the 
striking glaziers by setting glass on the Jackson school ? We 
also wonder if they will deny that non-union teamsters and 
union teamsters are working together? The same holds good 
with laundry workers and a great many of the other crafts." 



Time was when rabies was absolutely unknown in 

California, but Dr. Geiger, of the State hygienic laboratory 
said the other day : "The widespread recent occurrence of ra- 
bies in California, and the resultant large number of persons 
bitten by infected animals, have made preventative measures 
necessary. During the present epidemic, which began in 1909, 
26 deaths from rabies have occurred. The disease is now prev- 
alent more or less in all the populous districts of the State, but 
I believe the height of the present epidemic has been passed." 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Satan the Statistician- Meyer Lissner Reads Los Angeles a Timely Sermon— The Gross 
Materialism of Figures — Thrilling Tale of An Octopus — The Catfish and the 

Mouse— Multiplication of Police 



BY EDWARD F. CAH1LL 



I find in the California Outlook an article signed by Meyer 
Lissner, which appears to be at outs with the gospel of boost 
and brag through which Los Angeles hopes to be saved. I may 
say that I fully concur in Mr. Lissner's heresy, so far as that 
goes, but I am surprised that he should dare the wrath of the 
Los Angeles real estate sharks as he does in the following 
article: 

"Another foolishness in the newspaper campaign now being 
made for an unofficial census to prove that Los Angeles has 
at least 550,000 population instead of 430,000, as estimated 
by the census department at Washington. A professional cen- 
sus taker proposes to show the larger figure, all for the modest 
consideration of something like $25,000, of which Mayor Rose 
says he will gladly contribute $25. Budget-maker Whiffen, of 
the City Council, most magnanimously says that he will permit 
the balance to be raised by popular subscription. 

"What difference does it make whether Los Angeles has 
450,000 or 550,000 population? We don't lose any of our peo- 
ple by an under estimate by the census department, and an in- 
crease in population from 319,198, according to the 1910 cen- 
sus, to 438,000, according to the present Washington estimate, 
is not to be sneezed at. It is just as certain as anything may be 
that the official census of 1920 will show at least a million popu- 
lation in Los Angeles, and perhaps the effect upon the outside 
world upon which boosters lay so much store will be even bet- 
ter if it comes somewhat as an official surprise. 

"After all, it is not quantity of people that counts, but qual- 
ity — not so much the number that we have within our gates, 
as what we do with those that are here. 

"Let us use any spare change that we have for making better 
population instead of showing bigger population, and, in the 
meantime, let Nature take its course." 
B B B 

Satan, the Statistician. 

Not how many, but what kind? asks Lissner, and the ques- 
tion is well put. It may be that he is mindful of the precept 
implied in the text: 

"And Satan stood up against Israel and provoked David to 
number Israel . . . And God was displeased with this thing: 
therefore He smote Israel." 

Beware of Satan the Statistician, and read what the learned 
Bagshot has to say on this text: 

"I see in the history of the last hundred years an illuminat- 
ing commentary on this most cryptic of Scriptural incidents. 
Until the beginning of the 18th century the various communi- 
ties of the world lived in a flattering state of ignorance about 
themselves and their conditions. No great nation knew the 
numbers of its population, the amount of its trade, its birth- 
rate or its death rate, the proportion of its rich men and its 
poor men. Any nation could indulge in any dreams that flat- 
tered its vanity and claim to be bigger, wealthier and more en- 
terprising than its neighbors, without running the risk of ex- 
posure or disillusion; and a grand kind of chivalrous boastful- 
ness about imponderable manly virtues was the mark of patriot- 
ism. 



"Into this romantic fool's paradise comes Satan, the statisti- 
cian, bringing envy and malice, shattering dreams and poetry, 
prime author of the deadly prose and ungodly materialism of 
modern life. He will measure us and hold us up to scorn if 
we fall short of our neighbors by one inch in stature; he will 
keep up racked with anxiety lest we cease to grow or our 
neighbors grow faster; he will insist on the fullest exposure, 
not only to ourselves, but to all the world of our delicacies and 
weaknesses, and our sins and shortcomings. When we are 
strong, he will fill us with dread lest we become weak; when 
we are weak he will fill us with envy of those who are strong. 
And all the time he will insist that nothing shall count but what 
can be weighed in his scales or measured by his rule; and woe 
betide the country which would cheat him by putting its soul 
into the scale. For Satan, the statistician, has no mercy on 
you if you are merely beautiful or gifted; he requires peremp- 
torily that you be plump and sleek and your pockets bulging." 

B B S 
The Tribe of Ananias. 

Some forgotten humorist has divided the tribe of Ananias 
into liars, damned liars and statisticians, but the ingenious 
Bagshot goes into a deeper and more elaborate philosophy, to 
wit: 

"Statistics are the clinical thermometers of the modern 
world. There is an incessant taking of temperatures, followed 
by jealous comparison of the resulting records, and every pa- 
tient examines not only his own but every other patient's fever 
chart. This is a chronic source of jealousy and unrest in the 
modern world. It tends at times to an almost insane hypo- 
chondria in which the patient declares himself ill beyond re- 
covery, though his appetite is enormous and his growth un- 
ceasing. 

"The habit encouraged by statisticians of weighing quantities 
instead of measuring qualities is most debasing to ideals in a 
modern state. It is habitually taken for granted that a nation 
must be inferior to its rivals if it falls short of them in popu- 
lation, territory or volume of trade, regardless of the fact that 




en 



STRAIGHT 

ourbory 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 



A«ikt« Pacific Coast 



314 SACRAMENTO ST., S. F. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



on two out of three of these tests China would still be the 
leading nation of the world. Of what use is it to cry out on 
the vulgarity of worshipping wealth when all the great nations 
and their statesmen and spokesmen deliberately preach to us 
that the richest among them is the greatest? The chief need 
of to-day is to recover the thought that a country may hold 
the primacy of the world by leading it in ideas and the art of 
living. But for that we shall have to shut half the government 
departments and kill all the statisticians." 

Los Angeles, more than any other city of America, is satu- 
rated with the spirit of gross materialism, and this absurd 
census humbug is part of the game. Having canonized the mul- 
tiplication table, they have turned it into a joke. 

* V V 
The Tale of an Octopus. 

This is the season for fish stories, and I get from the Santa 
Cruz Sentinel the thrilling tale of Roswell Welch's alarming 
experience while on a fishing trip off the coast with his father, 
Game Warden Welch, and Dave Berkett. The members of 
the party were looking for abalones among the rocks on the 
beach, and while so engaged, became separated and lost sight 
of each other, until Game Warden Welch saw his son standing 
upon a rock at some distance away and beckoning to come to 
him. Thinking Roswell had found a good bunch of abalones, 
Mr. Welch went to him and found him almost exhausted and 
deathly pale. In reply to an inquiry as to what ailed him, 
Roswell explained that when reaching under a rock for an aba- 
lone, quick as a flash an octopus or devil fish had thrown one 
of its tentacles around his neck and another around his left 
arm. He pointed to a red welt on his neck and another on his 
arm as evidence of the fact. He had escaped from the mon- 
ster's clutches by bracing himself and chopping off, with an 
abalone bar, the tentacles which were being used to drag him 
into a pool of water under the rock, where the octopus was still 
lurking. The several tentacles lay on the rock as visible proof 
of the encounter. 

The three men then by a great effort rolled away the rock 
which sheltered the devi! fish, and killed the brute with their 
abalone bars, while it lashed around with its remaining six 
tentacles and ejected about a pailful of black fluid. 

The dead octopus, which weighed about 50 pounds, they car- 
ried to camp, where it was examined with great curiosity by a 
number of local residents. Its tentacles were about 6 feet 
long and as thick as a man's- wrist, where they joined the mon- 
ster's body. Game Warden Welch recommends all abalone 
hunters to provide themselves with sharp sheath knives as a 
means of freeing themselves from this eight-armed danger of 
the sea, if one should happen to lay hold of them, while in- 
vading its stronghold among 'he rocks. 

S S S 
The Caifish and the Mouse. 

I can cap that with a fresh water fish story attributed by the 
Fresno Republican to H. A. Goddard, the well known mem- 
ber of the Union League Club of this city and of the Commer- 
cial Club of Fresno. One learns that Goddard, as chairman 
of the annual picnic of the Commercial Club and the advance 
agent of its prosperity, gave out the information that fishing 
was to be the principal sport for the outing. Incidentally he 
promised all the club members a luncheon of fresh fish caught 
from the San Joaquin River on the spot. Goddard was re- 
minded that there was nothing but catfish in the river, and that 
they didn't bite very easily, but he declared that obstacle 
could be easily overcome. 

"We know that catfish prevail in the river," he said, "and 
we know that they won't strike at a fly or a spoon, but I have 



thought out a scheme that will be a dandy. For the last three 
days we have had a number of boys catching mice for us, and 
we have several hundred fat, gray mice. Really, a terrible 
temptation for a catfish. Well, we are going to place each of 
these mice on a small shingle for a raft and set them adrift 
down the river. As soon as the catfish smells the mouse he 
will come up out of the water, and when he makes a grab for 
the mouse, one of the fishermen will hit him over the head with 
a golf stick. 

"All will be provided with golf sticks, and several of the 
fishermen are known to have played eighteen hole games of 
golf in ninety-eight strokes, and they are sure to kill several 
hundred fish before all the mice are gone. We are going to 
start fishing early in the morning, and by 10 o'clock we will 
have plenty for all of the members of the club and their ladies." 

W 5 5 
Couldn't Match the Sample. 

The Los Angeles Graphic tells a good story of a polite elec- 
tion clerk and a young woman who came to cast her first vote 
at one of the numerous special elections of that political 
division. She had received a sample ballot and made a care- 
ful study of it, so that she would be able to do her duty at the 
polls. She went to the voting place, signed the book, and was 
given a little slip of paper. She hesitated, and then asked : 
"Where is the ballot?" "That is it, in your hand," the clerk 
informed her. "But the sample ballot was green," protested 
the fair tyro. A smile went around the table where the election 
officials sat. "I'm sorry, miss, but we cannot match the sample. 
Anything else to-day?" said one, mimicking the most approved 
ribbon counter manner, and the young woman, realizing the 
joke, laughed with the rest, and voted. 

{Continued to Page 24.) 




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San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




The San Jose Mercury has this concerning the straddlers 

who are playing the cuckoo in politics : "A candidate has un- 
doubtedly the right to resort to all legitimate means to secure 
his election; but it is a question if the kite with so many tails 
appended will find as popular a breeze or fly so well as the 
one more easily identified. If a man, for example, is on the 
Republican ticket alone there can be no question of his colors, 
or a Democrat or Progressive, one or the other, he is easily 
distinguished. But the man who seeks the shelter of his own 
and the can.ps of his neighbors, being all things to all parties, 
is less easily distinguishable, and hence less likely to draw to 
his canvass the support of those in a position to properly class- 
ify him. Why this foolish ruse is employed by otherwise sen- 
sible men we do not know, unless it is under the delusion that 
the more tickets he can bait the people with the better his 
chances of catching the thoughtless voter, who gives little 
leed to party designation." 

Superintendent of Schools J. R. Francis, of Los Angeles, 

apparently likes to pose as an intellectual spectacle. At the 
convention of the National Educational Association in St. Paul 
the other day, he declared that "the study of algebra causes 
many girls to lose their souls;" that "the average literature 
teacher has no soul and little brain," and that it is "a wicked 
waste of a child's life to compel him to study with her;" that 
"most of our teachers are selfish egotists, who should be 
scholars, hidden behind the word conservatism, afraid of any 
new method because it would show their ignorance;" and finally 
"nine-tenths of our immorality is due to damage done by teach- 
ers to boys and girls before they reach the high schools." Now 
did he really mean all that nonsense, or was he merely talking 
to hear himself talk? 

1. E. Levi, an apricot grower of Santa Clara County, 

swears that his product is both food and medicine, and he in- 
sists that for those suffering from indigestion as a result of 
insufficient acid in the stomach, the acid of the apricot supplies 
it, and with those who have indigestion as a result of too much 
acid, the sugar of the apricot neutralizes the acid; therefore 
as far as indigestion and dyspepsia goes, the apricot gets this 
affliction "going and coming." Mr. Levi also states that from 
the abundance in which apricots grow in Palestine, Canon Tris- 
tram supposes the apricot to be the apple of the Bible. Mr. 
Levi contends that if a person will eat just a few apricots every 
day and drink freely of water as well, that doctors will soon go 
out of business. 

The model husband has been again discovered — this 

time in Berkeley. Mrs. Charles Atwood is the fortunate wife, 
and Mr. Atwood's chief perfection, in her judgment, lies in the 
fact that he stays away from home and sends her money. The 
lady confided to Judge Edgar that on a recent occasion her 
wandering helpmeet came home and severely beat her, and she 
asked the court to make him stay away. "If you will see that 
he just stays away from home, everything will be all right," 
declared Mrs. Atwood, assenting to her husband's explanation 
ihat he had been intoxicated. "He was away before for more 
than two years, and it was fine. Every nickel he earned, and 
he did pretty well, that he did not need for himself, he sent 
home." 



Brinka is a real lady. A Modesto despatch tells us that 

an average of 68.1 pounds of milk and 2.519 pounds of butter- 
fat a day, and a total of 2,403 pounds of milk and 75.5 pounds 
of butter fat for the 30 days of June is the record of Brinka De 
Kol, a Holstein thoroughbred, established through the tests of 
the Stanislaus Cow Testing association. Of the 200 cows be- 
longing to the 23 owners in the association, but ten made a 
record of 1 1-2 pounds or more of butter fat a day. Brinka not 
only led the herds in amount of milk and butter fat, but also 
in the percentage test. Her owner has been compelled to do 
his milking in her case three times a day. Three small cheers 
for the illustrious Brinka. 

No explanation is given of the decline in the demand for 

free text books for the public schools this year, as compared 
with last year. San Francisco orders 47,730 books this year, as 
against 127,349 last year; Los Angeles 41,463 this year as 
against 124,253 last year; Long Beach 4,950 as opposed to 
12,175; San Diego orders 3,741, less than one-fourth of last 
year's demand, and Pasadena calls for 4,775 books, about one- 
fifth of the 23,050 needed last year. Although no explanation 
is given, it may be presumed that there is an annual waste or 
loss of one-third of the books, even when they are new. It 
might be worth while to inquire what is the average life of a 
free text book. 

Chief of Police Vollmer, of Berkeley, insists that a 

University town should have a high-brow constabulary, if only 
for the moral effect upon its ungodly neighbors. Vollmer de- 
clares that unlike the poet the policeman is made, not born, 
and in his annual report he announces that "effort is being 
made to educate our officers, who are now receiving instruction 
in the various subjects considered essential to the better per- 
formance of their duties. Examinations will be held annually, 
and the percentages obtained by the individual members will 
be made a part of this report in the future." A term on the 
Berkeley police force is equivalent to a liberal education. 

Another good friend of our rising young volcano has 

been found in the person of Professor R. S. Holway, of the 
Department of Geography in the University of California, who 
told the summer school the other day : "I wish to congratulate 
my fellow students on the fact that California, always the 
richest of the States in its geographic features, has added to its 
attractions a live volcano." The learned professor admitted 
that our volcano was short on lava, but had a competent out- 
put of hot rocks and sulphur fumes. On the whole, it is a 
well-behaved volcano. 

Ed. Leake, of Yolo, picks up the confusions of current 

politics, and says that Editor Rowell, who is seeking the Pro- 
gressive nomination for United States Senator, continues to 
abuse the new tariff law. for which nearly all the Progressives 
in Congress voted, thus giving a fine indication of a candidate 
who has lost his head. Since his support of Candidate Need- 
ham for Congress, Mr. Rowell has enjoyed the unique dis- 
tinction of being a Progressive for nine months in the year and 
a stand-pat Republican during September, October and No- 
vember. 

Redding folks blame the ultimate activity of Lassen be- 
cause eight hundred acres of land four miles north of Whitmore 
is sinking. Barbed wire fences are being rent at different 
points. Great big oak trees are toppling over, and pine trees 
are leaning and threatening to fall at any moment. Water is 
oozing from the ground in hundreds of places, and threatening 
to inundate the entire area. The land began sinking on the 
day following the first eruption. 



July 25. 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PLyEASURI/S WAND 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




PAUL OERSON. 



"Fine Feathers" at the Columbia. 

The All-Star Players are certainly on their met- 
tle this week. This play, with two exceptions, gives 
the entire company an exceptional opportunity to 
show the public the scope of their real ability. The 
short cast of six characters are individually and col- 
lectively what the actor terms "fat" roles. A poor 
acting company could make "Fine Feathers" inter- 
esting. The story is so deeply interesting and the 
tension throughout is so keen, that there is little 
opportunity for the interest to lag or relax. Of our 
present day American authors we have nobody who 
can write such terse and pithy dialogue as Eugene 
Walter. He certainly knows how to build a scene 
and pile on top of it climax upon climax, until we 
wonder where the inventive genius of the man will 
stop, and exactly how far he can go. "Fine Feath- 
ers" is a play of this kind. Each successive act is 
crowded with such scenes. The whole thing is posi- 
tively gripping. As a playwright, Eugene Walter 
stands in a class by himself. When the play was 
witnessed here before, it raised a storm of com- 
ment, but few found fault with the technical skill 
of the author. The play may be depressing, and at 
times almost morbid, but it is sincere and rings 
true. Monday evening everybody was prepared to 
make comparisons with the splendid cast seen here 
before. In all honesty, I would state that "The All- 
Star Players" have no need to feel ashamed. Gladys 
Hanson, now doing the role of Jane Reynolds, is 
much better than her predecessor in the role. Miss 
Hanson is a better all-round actress than Lolita 
Robertson. George Stuart Christie was assigned 
(he very difficult part of Robert Reynolds, done here 
' efore with such remarkable acting skill by Robert 
Edeson. This is the first chance Christie has had to 
show what he can really do since the company has 
been here. He handles the role along somewhat 
different lines than Edeson, but his performance on 
the whole stamps him as an actor of tremendous 
possibi'ities. He gives the part virility, and an 
amount of vital energy and force which surprised 
everybody. He rises to his big scenes with excel- 
lent discretion and judgment. In short, he shows 
what a good actor can do with a good part. His 
success Monday evening amounted almost to a personal tri- 
umph. Charles Cherry does Dick Meade, so well done before 
by Max Figman. Cherry gives his own interpretation of the 
part, and I liked it very much. Charles Richman does Brand, 
which was enacted before by Wilton Lackaye. The latter may 
be more polished in his manner and demeanor in the part, but 
beyond this I would state that the two performances leave 
little to choose between. Richman should make a splendid 
leading man for a regular stock company, as he appears to 
be such a good study, and is always sure of his lines. His 
John Brand this week is an altogether fine characterization. 

Charlotte Tittell wins a personal success as Frieda. We 
have had occasion to see little of this excellent actress during 
the engagement of the company, and though not a character 
actress, she nevertheless makes Frieda a regular howling suc- 
cess, investing the part with lots of unction and a genuine 
spirit of comedy. The play moved with surprising smoothness, 
there not being a single hitch anywhere. It is by far the big- 
gest success which the company has scored since its advent 
here. Too bad they did not open their engagement with this 
fine play. It is hard, though, nowadays to surmise what will 
please the public. Moving pictures and vaudeville have so 
completely revolutionized former existing conditions in the 
theatrical world that prominent managers are almost ready to 




Ernette Asoria. who will appear in Society and Cyclonic 
Dances next neck at the Otpheum. 

give up in despair, owing to their seeming incapability of be- 
ing able to cater to the erratic taste of the theatre-going public 
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San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




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"Officer 666" at the Alcazar. 

Our permanent stock company theatre is literally "packing 
'em in" this week with this melodramatic farce written by 
Augustin McHugh, and seen here some months ago when it 
scored a tremendous hit. This aforesaid hit is reflected at the 
Alcazar, where Miss Barriscale and Thurston Hall and the Al- 
cazar associates are giving a performance which is noted for all 
round excellence. "Officer 666" one might say has a thrill and 
laugh in it almost every minute of the two hours and a half. At 
all events, there is not a dull moment in it. From a comedy 
standpoint alone there are more genuine laughs in the play than 
in the ordinary farce, and as many real dramatic situations as in 
the best groomed drama. One could not reasonably ask for 
more. The play is a surprise all through, and keeps the audi- 
ence on the edge of suspense, wondering what the clever author 
is going to evolve next. The play as a whole is more or less of 
a novelty. I do not recollect another play exactly like it. One 
is laughing unroariously one moment and catching the breath 
the next at some thrilling incident. The play has an appeal for 
anybody who likes good entertainment, and the Alcazar audi- 
ences are almost devouring the play at one gulp, so evident is 
their enjoyment and appreciation. It is a pity the play cannot 
run two weeks, as the house is practically sold out for the en- 
tire week, and this is a record for these dog days. Bessie Bar- 
riscale does not have a trying role to assume, but she is more 
than bewitching in what she has to do. "Dainty Bessie" has 
grown to be a regular Alcazar fixture, and she has won for her- 
self a steadily growing clientele and a following which is very 
loyal to her. We sincerely hope that "Dainty Bessie" will make 
herself a regular visitor among us. 

Thurston Hall wins much favor with his breezy interpretation 
of Travers Gladwin. He shows that he enjoys comedy and 
knows how to play it, too, with much distinction. S. A. Burton 
does very well as the Japanese servant. It is a very good char- 
acterization. Bert Wesner, as "Officer 666," is more than good. 
Howard Hickman, as the picture thief, is fine, and gives the role 
the necessary sang froid and individuality which the role re- 
quires. It is a fine performance. Edmond Lowe scores a genu- 
ine hit with his clever acting of Whitney Barnes. It is a big 
part, and affords some admirable chances for good work, and 
Lowe is the man on the job. It is easily the best thing this actor 
has done for some time. Kernan Cripps is given a rest cure this 
week, and is seen in the brief part of the detective, which he 
does very well. Dorcas Matthews is pretty and engaging as 
Sadie Small, and a number of minor roles are in competent 
hands. The one setting is up to the splendid standard of the 
Alcazar, and is complete in every essential. Do not miss the 
Alcazar this week, providing you can secure seats. The play has 

registered one of the biggest hits of the season. 

• * • 

Orpheum. 

Trixie Friganza is, of course, the high light on the Orpheum 
bill this week, and she shines with dazzling brilliancy. She 
fills the whole stage, and might be said to carry the house on 
her ample shoulders. In fine, she spells success. So they give 
her the center of the stage, and she fills it, getting both laugh- 
ter and applause. She does, in fact, just what she pleases all 
the way. And it is the most refreshing evidence of sheer abil- 
ity for vaudeville that has yet been provided from the legiti- 
mate — or semi-legitimate — stage. 

Some of the stars from the two-dollar theatres refuse to be- 
lieve that vaudeville is a special talent. They find it out later, 
but won't admit it to themselves. Trixie Friganza proves that 
it is by possessing it. She belongs just where she is. She oc- 
cupied the stage for thirty-five minutes, assisted in one or two 
instances by a couple of young dancing gentlemen, but in the 
main as a quite solitary performer. She lampooned herself 
unmercifully, and sang songs of a characteristic sort, and con- 
tributed all sorts of burlesques upon the dances of the day. 

Following Trixie came a couple of Italian artists in a brief 
spell of fisticuffs. "Five Melody Maids and a Man" — this 
year two men — have been over the circuit before. Their play- 
ing on five pianos simultaneously and their dancing and singing 
will be recalled as a rather attractive novelty; and now that the 
tour is repeated, some new songs and slight innovations have 
been attempted. 

There is a good ventriloquist, Ray Conlin, who does a smart 
burlesque of Eddie Foy. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



ADVANCE ANNot \( EMENTS. 

Alcazar. — On Monday night, July 27th. Bessie Barriscale 
will enter upon the last stretch of her present engagement at 
the Alcazar Theatre. The management has chosen for the 
closing week Israel Zangwill's delightful comedy in four acts, 
entitled "Merely Mary Ann." This is one of the best plays 
of many seasons, and it should afford Miss Barriscale unlim- 
ited opportunity for her splendid talent. The leading role of 
little Mary Ann, the slavey, who becomes a great lady in the 
last act, will be a great role for charming little Miss Barriscale. 

Following Miss Barriscale, and opening on Monday night, 
August 3d, will come to the Alcazar an old favorite, in the 
person of Charles Ruggles, who returns for a brief season of 
four weeks to co-star with clever little Adele Rowland, who is 
best remembered here for her capital performance in "A Mod- 
ern Eve." 



Gaiety. — "Cabiria," at the Gaiety Theatre, begins its third 
week with every evidence of a continued and an indefinite 
success which could run for a period of months were it not 
for the fact that bookings outside of San Francisco have to be 
met, and it is not likely that the D'Annunzio masterwork will 
remain at the Gaiety for more than one or two weeks longer. 

In its musical expressiveness, in its tremendous appeal to 
the sense of sight, in its appeal to the senses that thrill, "Ca- 
biria" is unique among all photo-spectacles, and an adequate 
description is impossible. A delicious romance is intertwined 
in the historic scenes, holding the interest of the witnesser with 
a grip that reaches across the many centuries. 

• • • 

Orpheum. — Chrystal Heme, who is regarded as one of the 
foremost and cleverest of the younger leading legitimate ac- 
tresses of this country, will head the Orpheum bill next week 
:n a dramatic playlet entitled "Dora." 

Ernette Asoria, with the assistance of Miss Eliante and Che- 
valier de Mar will introduce a series of terpsichorean efforts. 

Prince Lai Mon Kim, the noted Chinese tenor, is one of the 
very few Orientals gifted with an appreciation of Occidental 
music and a voice which enables him to do it full justice. 

The Seebacks offer a particularly interesting gymnastic act. 
The male member is the champion bag puncher. 

Emil Pallenberg will introduce three trained bears which are 
simply marvelous. 

Next week will be the last of Clark and Verdi, and the Five 
Melody Maids and A Man, and also of Trixie Friganza. 



TO SUPPORT JOHN CURTIN. 

In support of John B. Curtin for Governor, prominent Demo- 
crats met Monday night in the office of J. J. McDonald, chair- 
man of the Democratic County Central Committee, in Oakland, 
and decided to form Curtin clubs in each of the eight Assembly 
districts of Alameda County. The Thirty-fourth Assembly dis- 
trict is organized, with H. H. McPike as chairman, and the 
Thirty-sixth, with R. B. Meyers as chairman. The club 
adopted the following resolutions : 

"Resolved, That this club heartily endorses the candidacy of 
Senator J. B. Curtin for Governor, recognizing that his splendid 
record of sixteen years in the Senate of California has won for 
him the confidence of the people of this State, and with him 
as the standard bearer of the Democratic party, we can march 
steadily on to victory in the coming election; 

"Resolved, That we pledge ourselves to aid in the formation 
of Curtin-for-Governor clubs throughout Alameda County, and 
all counties in the State, impressing upon the Democrats that 
we should unite upon him as the one man whose record stands 
without a blemish, and whose candidacy will inspire the con- 
fidence of the people of California." 



If you want an out-of-the-ordinary lunch at a ridicu- 
lously low price, go to Tait's. Here you will find the daintiest 
viands so appetizingly prepared that ever afterward you will 
not be hungry for lunch but "Hungry for Tait's" when noon- 
time draws near. Dinner at the same place is ideal. There is 
an "atmosphere" about dining at Tait's that expresses the full- 
est satisfaction. And the entertainment is unsurpassed for 
quality and novelty. 



After a Hot Day on the Beach 

There is nothing more grateful than to 

wash or bathe in water to which has been 

added a liberal supply of the genuine 

MURRAY & LANMANS 

(The Original, Century-old) 

Florida Water 

It soothes the skin, cools the 

smart of sunburn, and leaves a 

most enjoyable sense of comfort. After the 

bath, its fragrance, clinging to the person 

lends it an added charm. 

SOLD BY LEADING DRUGGISTS AND PERFUMERS 

Sample size mailed for six cents in stum/ix. 
Booklet "Beauty and Health " sent ofl request, 

LANMAN & KEMP, 135 "Water St., New York 




Alcazar Theatre 



O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Phone Kearnj 2 

Week Commencing Monday Night, July 27th, Matinees Thursday. Saturday, 
Sunday 

FAREWELL WEEK ! 
BESSIE BARRISCALE 
Supported By The Alcazar Players In Israel Zangwill's Delightful Comedy 

"MERELY MARY ANN" 
Summer Prices— Nights, 25c, 50c, 75c Mats., 25c, 35c, 50c 
A good orchestra seat at night for 50c 
Monday, August 3rd. Charles Ruggles — Adele Rowland 



Gaiety Theatre 



O'Farrell, Opposite Orpheum 
Phone Sutter 1141 



THIRD BIG WEEK ! 



"CABIRIA 1 



The Greatest Photo-Spt'Ciarle Ever Produced 

masterwork: 

Every Afternoon at 2:16 and Evening at 8:lf», 

Grand Opera Chorus. 

Matinee Prices, 25 and . r >0 cents; Evening Prices, 25c, 50c, 75c, 

ALL SEATS RESERVED. 



GABRIELE D'ANNUNZIO'S 
Superb Orchestra and a 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street 



Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 



WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON MATINEE EVERY DAY 

A GREAT NEW SHOW 
CHRYSTAL HERNE ami ller Company in the Dramatic Playlet " Mora" by 
lulle Berne; ERNETTE ASORIA with Miss Eliante and Chevalier fie Mar in 
Sni-iely A: Cyclonic Dances; PRINCE LAI MON KIM The Noted Chinese 
Tenor; THE SEEBACKS with nARRY SEEBACK World's Champion Hug 
r in His Athletic Novels; EMIL PALLENBERG with his THKEE 
TRAINED BEARS ON SKATES & BICYCLES; CLARK & VERDI: FIVE 
MELODY MAIDS AND A MAN. Last Week — Immense Hit TRIXIE 

LNZA. 
Evening Prices, 10c. 25c. 50c. 75c Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c. 50c. Phone Douglas 70. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 2230 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



BANK BOOK LOST 

Union Trust Company Savings Bank Account Book Number 
21376 has been lost. Finder is requested to return It to 
Union Trust Company, Grant Avenue and Market Street, 

San Francisco. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




The revival of tennis, due of course to the fact that Malcolm 
Whitman is a tennis shark, and that his wife is fast becoming 
a little shark, only proves that any sport can be popularized if 
the right dash of human interest is given to it. It would 
have been impossible to rehabilitate tennis with the smart set 
by handing around tracts, bound in limp leather, showing just 
what tennis does to the fashionable human race. The fact that 
"Jennie Crocker" and her husband are going in for tennis has 
done more for the game than mountains of literature. Now the 
few amphibians in the smart set want some one to cry "Come 
on sailing — the water's fine!" Some one has to get aboard a 
yacht and "stat something." 

A committee of men have decided that if they can only in- 
terest women : n the sport of sailing that the problem of putting 
our society on the water map will be solved. If the women 
can be prodded into enthusiasm the men feel that there will 
not be so much doubt about raising the funds to build a boat 
with which to lift the cup from Sir Thomas Lipton, who has 
promised to enter a boat if we arrange races here during the 
Exposition. 

This is a curious commentary on the influence of women, and 
it is still more curious that men should show themselves so 
thoroughly alive to that influence. I talked with one of the 
men the other day, and blinked at the strong light of his pene- 
tration. "We have to get the women into this game out here," 
he said ; "people have always blamed the bay — said that it was 
not a pleasure bay — but I believe that the trouble is that we 
have made it a stag affair. You get women interested, and you 
get behind a sport all the competition that comes from dressing 
the sport properly, you get all the sort of thing that they have 
in the East, and that we have lacked out here because the wo- 
men were out of it. If we get them interested, make it a sort 
of social game, with a lot of prestige, not one man, but several, 
will want to put up twenty or thirty thousand dollars for that 
cup! Their wives make them want to do it!" 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Alexander (Harriet Crocker) are 
coming to the coast, just as soon as the canal is opened, in 
their magnificent yacht, Speedwell, which is commodious 
enough to accommodate the party which the Alexanders will 
bring as their guests, and it is more than possible that the fact 
that they are coming out here in a yacht, and are planning 
pleasure trips in this vicinity, will inspire some of the local 
hostesses to matriculate for sea-going hospitality. Mr. and 
Mrs. John D. Spreckels get a great deal of pleasure out of their 
yacht, and have been the pioneers in that sort of thing around 
here, although of late years they have done most of their 
cruising around the Southern waters, as they make their home 
in San Diego. Colonel Jackling, the copper magnate, who will 
make his home in San Francisco when the new wing of the St. 
Francis is completed, has a yacht which is the wonder of these 
Western waters, and which doubtless will play a leading part 
in building up the society of the seas which even the old salt 
dogs, who hate to see the stag mariners who have ruled the 
bay put to rout by petticoats, admit is necessary in order to 
put the sport on a par with Eastern yachting. Mrs. Fred Kohl 
is one of the society women who, with a little encouragement, 
and the stimulus that comes from creative work, would be just 
the hostess to redeem our maritime hospitality and oust the 
mariners from taking up all the seas for bachelor quarters. 
© © © 

The luncheon given by the Woman's Board of the Exposi- 
tion for Mrs. Martin Glynn, wife of the Governor of New 
York, and Mrs. Wm. Hearst, is the only festivity of the week 
which has had any semblance of formality, and even that affair 
had the sort of mid-season touch which is inevitable at this 
time of the year, when so many people are out of town that it 
is practically impossible to get a very representative gathering 
of people together. Many of the women who are on the board 
are either in Europe, or enjoying country life in the mountains 
or by the seashore, so it is really something of a triumph to 



get together anything that looks like an assemblage of person- 
ages. Those who have met the wife of the chief executive of 
New York are genuinely enthusiastic about her, and have most 
commendatory things to say about her frank, unaffected man- 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

DURING 

Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 

CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



Plan to Spend Your Vacation in 

YOS EM ITE VALLEY 



THIS YEAR 



It costs no more than many a common- 
place resort In Yosemite there is nothing 
common. There Is plenty to do and see, and 
rest and recreation not found elsewhere. 

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE IN THE PARK 

Auto stages will carry the visitor between 
railroad terminus and Yosemite this season, 
one of the finest auto trips in the world, 
without extra cost. 

ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLOER 
There are hotels, boarding camps, private 

camping — your choice at reasonable rates. 
For further Information and rates, see any 

ticket agent, or address. 



YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY 

MERCED, CALIFORNIA 




HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Rates Reasonable 

Under Management of Victor Reiter 



ALP 



TAM - nl— I - AIS 

CALIFORNIA vs. SWITZERLAND 

WE HAVE THE ALPS RIGHT HERE 

Mt. Tamalpais and Muir Woods 



The Recreation 

and Play Grounds 

of San Francisco 



FARE 
EITHER TRIP 

$1.90 



Via Sausallto Ferry 

Foot of 

Market Street 



$7 ROUND TRIP TO 

Anderson Springs 

By Writing to 
ROSE E. ANDERSON 



Anderson's Springs 



Lake County, Cal. 



Rendezvous of Automobilists 
HOTEL OCCIDENTAL 

SANTA ROSA 

Rates, European Plan, $1.00 per day and up. 
Garage in Connection 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



ner. In these days when so many women make a profession of 
the kind of frankness which is a cross between rudeness and 
affectation, the genuine thing stands out even more sharply 
in contrast to the spurious manner which is so badly done by 
the women who lightly change their manners just as fast as 
a new set of mannerisms becomes the vogue. 

© © © 

The return of Miss Gertrude Jolliffe to town the other day 
aroused the suspicions of the social forecasters, who at once 
came to the conclusion that she had cut short her visit at 
Tahoe in order to come down here and prepare for a mid-sum- 
mer wedding, instead of going to the altar when the winter 
season is on. However, Miss Gertrude strenuously denies that 
there is any change in the plans, but she does blushingly ad- 
mit that perhaps the fact that it was necessary for her fiance, 
Dr. Allen, to cut short his vacationing, may have something 
to do with the scenery at Tahoe, and the congenial friends and 
relatives there palling on her. The Jolliffe girls divide their 
time between their own country place on the Rudolph Spreck- 
els estate and the Herbert Moffitt home on Lake Tahoe. Sobre 
La Vista, the Spreckels place, has had a great many improve- 
ments added since the fire several years ago, which destroyed 
the house and injured many of the shrubs and trees. No less a 
person than Mrs. Peter Martin, who has certainly been a guest 
de luxe all her life, and therefore something of an authority, 
says that never has she visited at a more charming country 
home than this beauty spot in Sonoma County, which unques- 
tionably placards the place with high praise. 

© © © 

The selection of Miss Margaret Abercrombie as the Harrison 
Fisher type of beauty, created a great deal of interest in society 
— for the news comes at a time of year when there are no 
thrills animating the smart set, and even soft bullets are grate- 
fully received as ammunition for the conversational lockers. 
In this case, the ammunition looks as though it had been or- 
dered at a florist's shop, for even the girls who work at being 
"catty" all the time admit that "Margaret is a magazine cover 
type all right!" They may refuse to accept her as their ideal 
of the dominant type of beauty which they would like to see 
spread over the land, but they grudgingly admit that "she is 
unquestionably the dominant magazine type which artists like 
Fisher spread over the land." Those who can detect a flicker 
of sarcasm in this have the crushing retort at command, which 
is that Prince Troubetskoy, the Russian painter and sculptor, 
asked her mother for permission to paint Margaret when they 
were in New York last winter, and only the fact that their visit 
was not long enough to permit sittings prevented the Russian 
artist from doing her portrait — which proves that the type has 
appeal to a wider art than the magazine field. 

This discussion reminds one of the time that Bernhardt 
came to the coast accompanied by a physician who was said 
to be one of the greatest beauty experts in the world, and the 
man who kept in full repair, with all the modern improvements, 
the most famous beauties of Europe. He was a man of many 
attainments, and when he was not preparing oils and ungents 
and irritants for these beauties to use, he painted their love- 
liness on canvas; therefore his opinion of loveliness was not 
so be scouted. So when the San Francisco beauties of that day 
were paraded before his appraising eye in all their photo- 
graphic loveliness, he selected half a dozen with the trained 
hand of the expert, and then, with the unerring touch of the 
gifted master, lifted out the portrait of Edith Preston, now 
Mrs. Willard Drown, and proclaimed her the beauty par ex- 
cellance of the group. He gave his reasons in gracious French 
for pedestaling her a little higher than the others, who also met 
with his flattering approval, but as always happens in transla- 
tion, the letter, rather than the spirit, is dominant, and the 
gracious quality of the explanation came out in the wash of 
translation pretty faded looking. Of course, the fact that he 
had arrived at his conclusion by the process of elimination, 
and that the four or five next in line were likewise exploited, 
gave a tang to the whole discussion, and society divided up into 
as many groups for and against his verdict — but it was all very 
good natured, for no one lakes these things very much to heart, 
and fortunately nothing has yet been invented to destroy the 
sense of humor which car. always be counted on to save a 
situation of this sort. 



Although the songbirds in their glee 

Make up a gay and tuneful troupe, 
The birds that I delight to see 
Are yonder in the chicken coop. 

— Washington Star. 



Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 
Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



Jl Quiet Hotel of Unusual Excellence 



Bell 



evue 



Hotel 



Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters fispecaill}) to Luncheons and Banquets 

H. W. WILLS, Manager 



ALL ROADS LEAD TO 

CASA del REY 

at 

SANTA CRUZ 

And They're Good Roads Too. 
RATES REDUCED 



AT THE HOME. CLUB, CAFE OR HOTEL 

CASWELL'S COFFEE 

ALWAYS SATISFACTORY 

Geo. W. Caswell Co. 

530-534 Folsom St. San Francisco 



JAMES KEANE ACADEMY 
of Motion Picture Acting 

at the UNITED KEANOGRAPH FILM MANU- 
FACTURING CO., Studios— Fairfax, Marin County. 



1 hour from 
San Francisco, 
Telephone San 
Rafael 8 7 O- 
The finest mo- 
tion p ictu re 
studio in the 
west where re- 
fined students 
will be given 
practical stage 
and acting ex- 
perience before 
the camera. 
Write for a 
booklet. 




14 



San Francisco News Letter JuLY 25 > 1914 - 

II I ..H I' ■ ' I I ■ ■ ■ ■ '■ ! ■■ [ ■■ . ■■ . I'l«l " I 1 1 1 ■ Ml 





'^i:!:;::':^W' :: '^:;^:^;^V-::^:-'i-fe^:';^ ''■ ■'~ : \$&: >--':'■' 




ENGAGEMENTS. 

ALDEN-KLEINERT — Mr. and Mrs. O. Alden announced the engagement 
of their daughter, Violet, to Alfred G. Kleinert at a dinner given at 
their home last week. Miss Alden is a member of the Gamma Chi 
Sorority. 

KELLOGG-McKEXLAR— Mr. and Mrs. F. "W. Kellogg announced at 
Pasadena the engagement of their daughter, Dorothy, to Dr. James 
H. McKellar of Pasadena. Miss Kellogg was graduated last year from 
Bishop's School at Lajolla and is very popular in the younger set at 
Pasadena, Her fiance is a well-known physician of Los Angeles. 
Miss Kellogg was born in Detroit, but has lived in California for the 
past ten years. She is a granddaughter of William A. Scripps, well 
known philanthropist of Pasadena. Her father is F. W. Kellogg, 
publisher of the San Francisco Call and Post. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

WHEELER-HEAD — July is the date set for the marriage of Miss Eliza- 
beth Wheeler and Mr. Eradway Head, the ceremony is to take place 
on Tuesday evening. Bishop William Ford Nichols will read the 
ceremony a St. Luke's Episcopal church. Following the service, 
there will be a rather small assembly of the relatives and oldest 
and dearest friends at the Charles Stetson Wheeler home, and later 
in the fall, when the other two daughters of the household. Miss 
Olive Wheeler and Miss Lillias Wheeler are married, there will be a 
large reception to include all of the friends of the Wheeler family. 
Miss Lillias Wheeler will be married to Mr. Matt Savage Walton of 
Lexington, Ky., on September 16th, and it is expected that by that 
time Lieutenant Curtis H. Nance will have arrived from the Philip- 
pines, when the date of his marriage to Miss Olive Wheeler will be 
announced. The bridal party for Miss Elizabeth Wheeler and Mr. 
Head will include the Misses Lillias and Jean Wheeler as bridesmaids 
and Miss Olive Wheeler as maid of honor. Mr. Lawrence O'Toole 
will be best man and the ushers will be Messrs. Theodore Wilder, 
Robert Webber and David Oliphant. 

WEDDINGS. 

GARDENER-BURG.— In their fine home, 1501 Lake street, where they 
will reside after their honeymoon, Mrs. Clara B. Gardener and Mr. 
Cal H. Burg were married Tuesday of last week, a large throng of 
friends being present at the ceremony and enjoying a wedding sup- 
per afterward. The house was decorated with flowers in unusual 
profusion. The maid of honor was Miss Florence Gardener and Mr. 
E. J. Burg was best man. Mrs. E. J. Burg was matron of honor. 
The ushers were Mr. Edward Burg Jr. and Mr. G. F. Burg. The 
ring bearer was E. J. Burg. The wedding ceremony was performed by 
Dr. E. H. Hadlock. 

GREAVES-MOORE — Miss Florence Greaves and Mr. Charles Kindness 
Moore were married Tuesday at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church 
Hollywood. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Travis 
Greaves of this city. She is a graduate of Miss Gamble's School at 
Santa Barbara, and her friends include the Misses Rebecca and 
Elizabeth Shreve, Genevieve Bothin and others of the younger set 
that went south to school. Mr. Moore is a Yale man. The honey- 
moon will be passed at Lake Tahoe, and a home at Beverly Hills 
await them on their return. Misses Dorothy and Marjory Greaves 
were their sister's principal attendants, and Harry Alexander Bruce 
was best man. 

ORR-JORGENSEN.— Miss Florence Orr, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Wallace Orr, and Virgil Williams Jorgensen were married Wednesday 
evening at 8:30 o'clock in the First Unitarian Church. After the cere- 
mony the bride and groom, with Mr. and Mrs. James Wallace Orr, 
Mr. and Mrs. Chris Jorgensen and the bridal party, held an informal 
reception in the church parlors, where "good-byes" were said, as well 
as congratulations proffered, for Mr. and Mrs. Jorgensen left Thurs- 
day for a two years' sojourn in Paris, where the former will devote his 
time to the study of architecture. After the reception, the bridal 
party and old friends of the family went to the Fairmont, where the 
wedding suppei was served. 

TORMEY-CALLAGHAN— Miss Mary Tormey and Ensign Daniel Judson 
Callaghan, U. S. N. f were married at the Church of St. Francis de 
Sales, on Thursday evening. July 23d. The bridal party included the 
Misses Rose Marie Callaghan, Marguerite Sullivan, Alleen Rourke, 
Margaret Durney and Adele Lucke, and Ensign Milton Anderson, U. 
S. N., was best man. 

TEAS. 

NUERNBERG.— Prior to the sailing Monday of the German cruiser 
Nuernberg, Captain von Schaenberg gave an informal tea on board 
ship, complimenting Lieutenant- Commander and Mrs Wallace Ber- 
tholf. 

SHEEN.— Mrs. H. H. Sheen was hostess Thursday at an elaborate bridge 
tea at her home at Fort MSley. The affair was given in honor of 
the hostess's cousin, Miss Eleanor Schleicher, of Texas. 

LUNCHEONS. 

CLOMAN.— Last Thursday, Major and Mrs. Cloman were host and 
hostess at an informal luncheon at the St. Francis, 

ELKINS.— Last week Mrs. Elkins was hostess at an informal luncheon, 
the guest list of which included Mrs. William H. Bartlett, Miss Yso- 
bel Chase. Miss Beatrice Miller, Miss Marguerite Doe and Miss Nina 
Jones. 



MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin gave a luncheon Sunday at the Burlin- 
game Country Club in honor of Mrs. George Bell, Jr., to celebrate the 
promotion of Colonel George Bell. Jr., to the rank of Brigadier- 
General. 

MAU. — Miss Erna Hermann was the guest of honor at a bridge luncheon 
given Thursday afternoon by Miss Edith Man, 

McNEAR. — Miss Ernestine MteNear, whose engagement to George Nickel 
was announced a few weeks ago. was guest of honor at a luncheon at 
which Mrs. Felton Elkins presided Thursday at the Montecitn Country 
Club. 

DINNERS. 

BLACK.— Charles Black and his daughter. Miss Marie Louise Black, en- 
tertained at dinner Monday evening at their home on Broadway. La 
France roses and lace ferns adorned the table. After dinner the 
party enjoyed the performance at the Columbia. 

CROCKER. — Charles 'fempleton Crocker will be host at an elaborate 
dinner to be given in honor of Harry Scott at the Bohemian Club 
on Friday evening. July 24th. 

HARRIS. — Lieutenant and Mrs. C. P. Harris gave a delightful dinner 
last Friday evening in their quarters at Fort Wlnfield Scott in com- 
pliment to Colonel and Mrs. J. C. Joyes, of the arsenal at Benicla. 

ORR. — Mr. and Mrs. James W. Orr were host and hostess at a delightful 
dinner at their home in Gough street on Saturday evening, their 
guests of honor being Mrs. Chris A. Jorgensen and Miss Amy Jor- 
gensen. 

PIKE. — Cut flowers and maidenhair in crystal vases decorated the din- 
ner table at which Mr. and Mrs. Roy Pike presided Friday evening 
in their home in Pacific avenue in honor of Mrs. Norma Preston 
Ames, who will become Airs. Harry Scott on July 29th. 

PFINGST. — Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst was hostess at a delightful din- 
ner at her summer home near Santa Cruz last week. 

RAISCH. — Miss Aimee Raiseh entertained at a dinner and theatre party 
Thursday night in honor of Raymond Campbell, who is home from 
West Point on vacation. 

WILLIAMS. — On Friday evening. Lieutenant and Mis. B. II. L. Williams 
gave a dinner for Colonel and Mis. Isaac W. Llttell and their daugh- 
ters at Fort Winfield Scott, who left Saturday i"i Washington. 
SUPPERS. 

GOVE. — The many friends of Rear-Admiral and Mrs. Charles Gove have 
been showering them with good wishes and congratulations since the 
former received his promotion. Wednesday evening Admiral and Mrs. 
Gove gave a supper at their home at Yerba Ruena. 
DANCES. 

PERMCDY. — Miss Hazel Maxom. one of the younger set in Honolulu 
society, was elaborately entertained on last Saturday evening by 
Miss May Dermody at the home of hei parents in 1631 Bush street 
The evening was pleasantly passed in music and dancing. 

FIClvERT. — An informal dancing party was given by Mr, and Mrs. Chas, 
Fickert on Friday evening at their home in Green street. 

SOUTHERN CLUB.— An event In social circles in the near future is the 
dance to be given l ■ > the members of the Southern Club mi Friday 
evening, July 31st. at the club house in California street. 



Pears' 

"A shining coun- 
tenance" is pro- 
duced by ordinary 
soaps. 

The use of Pears 
reflects beauty and 
refinement. Pears' 
leaves the skin soft- 
white and natural. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



RECEPTIONS. 

(JREAN .Valtei C, G i Dct'ptlon ul liei I 

Scott streel i"< ■ -on in honor ol Mis. Marj E. Hart, 

\* »N SCHAi ,1 in, last week was the 

dim,- l ,,, M Lteo Polo Club In Mills- 

borough on evening In honor of the visiting officers of the 

< ierman cruiser Nuem i I [axon and Bai 

Eckhard von Schack, the acting German Consul and his wife, Baron 
and Baro m the homo of the 

German Consul, Franz Bopp, during his absence, were the guests ol 
Mr, and Mrs. George n. Howard at San Mateo, The club house was 
very attracl ■ ■ -rated with flowers and the German and Ameri- 

colors foi the occasion, 

WEEK-END PARTIES. 

PARNHAM.- A delightful week-end party was given bj Mr. and Mrs. 
Sylvanus Farnham at their countrj home at Boulder Creek, their 
lesl : n i in nlng to the city Tuesday. 

PAGE. — Willi Captain and Mrs. John Burke Murphy and Captain Herbert 
Brees ...s the complimented guests, Miss Leslie Page entertained a 
party of friends over the week-end at the San Rafael home of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Page. 

ARRIVALS. 

COOL. — Dr. LuElla Cool, who has been spending a month at her bunga- 
low. "Casa ESsperanza," Camp Meeker, has returned to the Cadillac 
Hotel with her guests, Mrs. Newcomb of New Jersey, Mrs. Heagney, 
the Vice-Grand of Loyal Lodge of San Francisco, and Mrs. Carrie 
Freeman, 

FREYER.— - Lieutenant and Mrs. Frank Freyer arrived Monday from 
Washington. D. C. where the former has been stationed for the 
last two years. 

GLYNN.— Among the noted arrivals in San Francisco are Mr. and Mrs. 
William Randolph Hearst, accompanied by Mrs. Martin H. Glynn, wife 
of the Governor <>l New York, and the Misses Hazel Bliss and Margaret 
Goodrich, who have been the guests of the Hearsts on a transconti- 
nental tour. 

GREENWOOD. — Mr. and Mrs. George Greenwood and Miss Suzette 
Greenwood, who have been abroad for about a year, are being wel- 
comed home by their friends. 

1-IAYNE. — Mr. and Mrs. Robin Y. Hayne have returned from a visit with 
Mr. and Mrs. Felton B. Elkins in Santa Barbara. 

LJL1ENTHAL.— Mr. and Mrs. Jesse W. Lilienthal. Jr., who have been 
honeymooning at Tahoe Tavern, returned to town Sunday, and are 
domiciled at the Fairmont Hotel for the present. 

MARYE. — George T. Marye, the newly appointed Ambassador to Russia, 
and Mrs. Marye, arrived In Sari Francisco Monday from Washington, 
D. C, to put their affairs at home here in final arrangement for their 
departure for St. Petersburg. 

NEWHALL. — Mrs. William Mayo New-hall has returned from Europe, 
and has joined her family in Burlingaine. 

POOLE. — Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Poole have come from their home in Vir- 
ginia, and ate visiting the la t tor's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ri 
Sprague at Menlo Park. While here they will be entertained at a 
number of smart affairs. 

SCHMOLL.— Dr. Emil Schmoll, who has been at Del Monte for the last 
three weeks, returned to town Sunday. 

SPRHCKELS, — Mrs. .lark Spreekels, who has been abroad, is home again, 
occupying her artistic apartments, one of the Cliff Dwellings in Wash- 
ington street. 

HPROULB. — Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Sproule and the hitter's daughter, Miss 
Marie Louise Baldwin have returned to town. 

WARNER. — Mr, and Mrs H. R. Warner and Miss Alice Warner are at the 
Palace. They motored up from Del Monte M laj afternoon, 

DEPARTURES. 

DE TRISTAN. — Vic te and Vicomtesse de Tristan ami their chlldrei 

closed their homi al San Mateo, and left last week for Europe. I 
win pass the nexl wlntei al the home of the De Tristans In I 

WISSEK.-Mis. John l' Wlsser left lasl week foi southern California. 

GRIFFIN.— Mr. and Mrs. Frank Griffin Lefl for a motor trip 

through th. mining country of I 'lacer County. 

HOWARD George Howard, Jr.. who was hoal to a number of the Ger- 
man officers of the cruiser Nuremberg:, left Saturday for Santa Bar- 
bara, to remain for the rest ol the month. 

L10NT. Mr, and Mis George H, Lent lefl Wednesday In their touring 
car for Lake Tahoe, where they will Join Mr. and Mrs, Etobi 
Hooke t their three little sons. 

NIBBLING, Mi:--.:. Khods Nlebllng lefl lasl tveeh rot a month's visii 
to Judge .in! iir W. W, Cotton In Portland, Ore. 

PARROTT. Misses Bmllle and Josephine Parrott, John Porrott, Jr.. Jos. 
Parrott and Edmund Pai ott, iccompanled by their tether, John 
rott, left le ata Barbara, where they will be at the 

Tetter for the next six weeks. 

RAISCH, Miss AJmee Etalscti left Inst Wednesday for San Mateo, where 

she will visii Mrs Walter Mbert Scot! for the next ten days. 
STHTSON.— Mt. and Mrs, Harry Stetson have tone to Santa Barbara, 

ire she v ill I t Of her parents at San DIegO for the next 

month or two. 

INTIMATIONS. 

BLISS Mrs. William Bliss, Kr . and her daughter, Bliss Hope Bliss, have 
returned from the Blast and will ke Tahoe. 

CAROLAJS. -Mr Fran.is Carolan is at Del Monte with friends, with 

whom he will gpand s <■■ 
DB QUIGNE. — Mr. ami Mrs. Christian de Gulgne have derided I 
■nil of August, and are plain 
Urs.de' ther and sister- In-law, Mr, and Mrs. Felton 

BDB Mr ai d Mrs !de and their two 

the fullest extent, bavins motored down from Piedmont. 



i.ii.iK.Niu \, ontemplatlng 

loavlng in September for Europe 
M VRTIN. Mi nn I i Martin, who have b< 

1 ,|Im1 Tal place of Mr. and Mrs. Fn dei Ick Ki 

t" their home in Burlln 

'■■■■■" and Ml . . spend 

part ol the m h al Santa Barb It! Felton 

Elkins. 

McKITTRIC] i aptaln and .Mis Wm Holmes McKlttrlck arrived Wed- 
nesday from Santa. Barbara going on to Bakers field foi 
visit. 

NICHOLS. Bis iand Mrs. Wm. Ford Nichols i M^m.- as the 

•is "i Mrs. > leorge \\ . Qlbbs. 

POPE.— Mr, and Mrs. Qeorgi A, Pope and their children Will spend the 
remainder of the month at Tahoe 

RATHBONE. — Mr. and Mrs. Gerald RathbOne and Mr. and Mrs. Win. Dun- 
can, have been enjoying a motor trip through the State. 

HIDEOUT. — Mrs. Corinue Rideout writes enthusiastically of the wonderi 
of the northeastern part of the Slate. She left here some week) 
and has taken a leisurely motor trip. 

STONE. — Mr. ar.d Mrs. C. B. Stone are at Idlewild In the Santa Cruz 
Mountains, where they will be for the remainder of the su ier. 



Superior Judge Franklin Griffin took charge of award- 
ing the prizes at the dancing contests at Techau Tavern on the 
evening of Wednesday, July 22d, and by his appropriate re- 
marks won the approbation of all who were present. The 
prizes for each contest were two in number — one for the gen- 
tleman and one for the lady, and were most attractive and 
costly. The Tavern was crowded to its utmost limit with en- 
thusiastic guests, all of whom received beautiful souvenirs of 
the occasion, and five of the lady guests exquisite and artistic 
articles purchased by the management from the collection of 
the well known art dealers, S. & G. Gump Co. 



F. R. BIGELOW, President 
A. E. KREBS, Auditor 



A. W. PERRY, Secretary 
H. S. GREEN, Ass'tSec'y 



99th SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

JUNE 30th, 1914 

St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company 

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 

ASSETS LIABILITIES 



Bonds at Market Value 

June 30th 
stocks at Market Value 

June 30th 
Real Estate (Home Office 

Bldg. $216,167.26) - 
Mortgage Loans - 
Cash and Bank Deposits 
Agents' Balances - 

Dau from Re-Insurance 

i lo.'fl Notes, etc. 
Accrued Interest - 



$ 6.952,827.03 

269.775.00 

251,508.66 

871.905.00 

194.379.52 

1.402.966.34 

240.866.13 

64.099,52 

$10,249,327.20 



Reserve for Unearned 

Premiums - - $ 5.196.918.55 

Unadjusted Losses - 717.903 44 

Reserve for Taxes - 100.000.00 

Special Reserve - - 169,368.70 
Due Companies and 

Agents - - - 101.279 93 
Capital Stock $1,000,000.00 

Net Surplus 2.963.856.58 3.963,856.58 

$10,249,327.20 



COMPARISON WITH DEC. 31, 1913: 

- $784,437.47 
32 402.15 



Increase in Assets 

Increase in Unearned Premiums 



Gain in Policyholders Surplus 



M. C. HARRISON & CO., General Agents 



Before lO A. M. Res. Phone Prospect 1973 

After 10 A. M. Studio " ,r 2177 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

FOR THE STUDY OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN DANCES 

Private Lessons Given 1443 POLK STREET 

By Appointment Only Studio 1 1 

Sketches For Vaudeville Furnished 



BRUSHES 



623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 

E. H. PEASE. 




GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 
M9. ML 993 Msrket Si 



Tke best sis 

streatest 
Gardes Hese 

Goarsautee le 

mid 700 lbs 
Presmrt 

THY IT AND 

•E CONVINCED 

Saa Frai 



White Diamond Water Company, Inc. 

Pure Water for Oakland. Alameda, Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically treated 
but bacteriologically purified by electrical process. S gallons DELIVERED 
FRESH EACH WEEK. ll-SO per month. Single 6 gallon bottle. 40 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792 
5736 Telegraph Ave., opp. Idora Park Oakland, Cal. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 






UHNANCIAV 



The noteholders of the People's 
People's Water Co. Water Company are secured by 

twice and a half the face value of 
the notes in bonds. The notes aggregate $3,000,000, and the 
holders have named a protective committee, which issues the 
following statement: 

"The committee feels that its efficiency will be materially 
increased if it receives the unanimous backing of the note- 
holders. A sale of all of the bonds of the People's Water 
Company that have been pledged would increase the bonded 
and secured debt of that company to the extent of nearly five 
million dollars, and would diminish the value of the security 
of the notes to tae extent of nearly 33 per cent. It is, there- 
fore, vital to the interests of all that no further sales of pledged 
bonds take place, at least for a reasonable length of time. In 
its dealings with the several committees of bondholders, your 
committee's power to protect your notes will be greatly in- 
creased by the fact that the noteholders are acting as a com- 
pact body whose friendly co-operation will be absolutely essen- 
tial to the bondholders, and will be given only on condition that 
the interests of the noteholders be properly recognized. 

"In view of the great advantages to be derived from con- 
certed action, and the danger from individual action, your com- 
mittee requests you, as it will request all other noteholders, 
to give it an assurance not to sell, at least for ninety days, any 
pledged bonds of the People's Water Company. If before the 
1st of August, 1914, your committee receives this guarantee 
from not less than 90 per cent of the noteholders, it is be- 
lieved that definite assurance for the payment of the note in- 
terest can be secured." 



Pacific Gas and 
Electric Statement 



The Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany's condensed statement for 
June, for the first six months of the 
year 1914, and for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1914, follow: Gross earnings, $1,379,438, inc. 
$128,248 changes; Net earnings, $644,711, inc. $171,419 
changes; Balance after bond interest and discount, $308,120, 
inc. $163,859 changes. For the six months ending June 30th : 
Gross earnings, $8,587,991, inc. $540,712 changes; Net earn- 
ings, $4,188,037, inc. $731,230 changes; balance after bond in- 
terest and discount. $2,167,871, inc. $671,954. For the twelve 
months ended June 30th: Gross earnings, $16,743,050, inc. 
$1,316,322 changes; Net earnings, $7,602,367, inc. $1,135,216 
changes; balance after bond interest and discount, $3,612,396, 
inc. $996,009 changes. 

The company in its statement to stockholders again asks all 
to subscribe to the new issue for first preferred. 



The Oakland, Antioch and Eastern 
Oakland and Antioch. Railway has filed an application 

with the Railroad Commission, ask- 
ing authority to issue $900,000 of 6 per cent convertible gold 
notes to be secured by its first mortgage 30 year gold bonds in 
ratio of 2 to 1. The notes are to be convertible before matur- 
ity at the holder's option on the basis of 80 per cent of the par 
value of the bonds, and accrued interest, as against the par 
value of the notes and accrued interest. It is furthermore pro- 
vided that the notes shall be redeemable in whole or in part at 
the option of the company on any interest date at face value 
and accrued interest on not less than 30 days' notice. The 
company proposes to sell these notes at not less than 96, the 
proceeds to be used toward paying off floating indebtedness. 
On April 30, 1914, this indebtedness amounted to $1,349,960.44 
with cash on hand of $44,561.85, and accounts receivable to 
$89,144.34. The company now has outstanding 100,000 shares 
of common stock, par value $100, and 4,355 first mortgage 
30 year gold bonds, par value $1,000. During the last fiscal 
year it paid out $280,735.15 in interest. 



The stockholders of the Northern 
Northern Cal. Power. California Power Company have 

authorized an increase in the capi- 
tal stock of $2,000,000 6 per cent cumulative non-assessable 
preferred, of which it is intended to issue at present only $500,- 
000. There were represented at the meeting 800,000 out of a 
total of 100,000 shares. The half-million preferred will be put 
out at 80, and offered to common stockholders for subscription 
in the ratio of one share of preferred for each twenty shares 
of common now held. As the opinions of stockholders had 
been pretty well canvassed before this action was taken, offi- 
cials of the company say there is little doubt in their minds 
but what the issue will be taken by those entitled to subscribe. 
The Northern California Power Company has a very large 
generating capacity in excess of its requirements. To operate 
to capacity costs no more than to operate on the present basis. 
Meantime, without adequate markets, fixed charges run high in 
proportion to revenue. The new money is needed to develop 
additional markets. 



A special despatch from Los Angeles stated that the 

directors of the Union Oil Company had met in that city and 
declared a regular semi-annual dividend at the rate of 2 per 
cent, payable August 25th to stock of record July 31st. This 
is in accord with previous announcements to the effect that the 
stock would go on a 4 per cent basis in July, 1914. 

The Royal Dutch Petroleum Company, in connection with 
its annual report, issued a summarized balance sheet of the 
California Oil Fields, Ltd., the concern taken over last year 
by the Dutch-Shell combine. This statement shows that the 
California company's net profits for 1913 amounted to $682,- 
762, as compared with $659,714 the previous year. The com- 
pany paid a dividend of 5 per cent on its $400,000 issued capi- 
tal stock, leaving a profit and loss surplus for 1913 of $806,- 
730. Production of the California Oil Fields, Ltd., last year 
amounted to more than 4,400,000 barrels, as compared with a 
production in 1912 of 4,248,849 barrels. 



San Joaquin Light 
And Power. 



The financial statement of the San 
Joaquin Light and Power Corpora- 
tion for the month ending June 30, 
and the six months of 1914, ending 
on the same date, were given out by N. W. Halsey & Co. 
There has been an increase in the operating expenses. The 
increase in the interest charge is explained by the fact that 
this company, like others, has had recourse to the plan of is- 
suing short term notes to meet capital requirements. The state- 
ment is as follows : Month ending June 30th — Gross income, 
1913, $141,372.42; 1914, $153,756.72. Operating expenses, 
maintenance, taxes, 1913, $63,694.98; 1914, $61,062.48. Net 
income, 1913, $77,677.44; 1914, $92,694.24. Interest charges, 

1913, $35,050.51; 1914, $42,326.39. Balance, 1913, $42,626.93; 

1914, $50,367.85. Six months ending June 30th — Gross income, 
1913, $831,802.37; 1914, $919,728.69. Operating expenses, 
maintenance, taxes, 1913. $342,956.32; 1914, $341,752.42. Net 
income, 1913, $488,846.05; 1914, $577,976.27. Interest charges, 
1913, $203,411.79; 1914, $253,520.75. Balance, 1913, $285,- 
434.26; 1914, $324,455.52. 



TEACHING FOR MOTION PICTURE STAGE. 

In virtue of his great experience as a director of dramatic 
art, James Keane has organized the United Keanograph Film 
Manufacturing Company, of Fairfax, Marin County, with a 
full staff composed of thoroughly competent motion picture 
directors. The course will extend over a period of three months, 
during which time a pupil will become thoroughly competent 
to pursue the vocation of motion picture acting or come to 
realize their unfitness for the vocation. The management in- 
tends to select from amongst its students talent of unusual per- 
sonal magnetism and screen qualifications, with the idea of 
using them in feature productions to be staged in the near 
future. In a feature production of 6,000 feet recently com- 
pleted by the United Keanograph Film Mfg. Co., at its studios 
in Fairfax, several hundred men and women were given the 
opportunity to make good. Many evinced ability, and with 
the benefits of a technical training would make decided suc- 
cesses. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



MISS HAML1NS SCHOOL. 



Noted Institution of 



Some Interesting Particulars About a 
Learning. 

Whether as a finishing school or a preparation for the 
universities, Miss Hamlin's School for Girls, at 2230 Pacific 
avenue and 2117-2123 Broadway, in this city, has no equal on 
the Pacific Coast. In testimony to this fact, and the high char- 
acter of the school, its educational and social standing, it is 
worth while to examine the list of distinguished men and wo- 
men who stand as references for this institution of learning. 
The list includes Hon. James B. Angell, President University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Benjamin Ide Wheeler, 
President University of California, Berkeley, California; David 
Starr Jordan, President Leland Stanford Junior University, 
Palo Alto, California; Rt. Rev. Wm. Ford Nichols, Bishop of 
California, San Francisco; Rev. Wm. Kirk Guthrie, Pastor First 
Presbyterian Church, San Francisco; Rev. Wm. Rader, Pastor 
Calvary Church, San Francisco; Rev. Samuel H. Willey, Ber- 
keley, California; Hon. Charles Sumner Hamlin, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts; Prof. Chas. Mills Gayley, University of California, 
Berkeley, California; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. T. Reid, Belmont 
School, Belmont, California; Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Boone, 
Berkeley Preparatory School, Berkeley, California; Mr. and 
Mrs. Osgood Putnam, San Francisco; Judge and Mrs. Aylett R. 
Cotton, San Francisco; Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst, Pleasanton, 
California; Mr. and Mrs. E. J. De Pue, San Francisco; Mr. and 
Mrs. George P. McNear, Petaluma; Mr. and Mrs. 0. M. Golda- 
racena, San Francisco ; Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Morrison, San Fran- 
cisco; Dr. and Mrs. T. W. Huntington, San Francisco; Capt. 
and Wm. Matson, San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Tillman, 
San Francisco; Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Orr, San Francisco. 

The social standing of the school may be gathered from the 
fact that many of the leaders of the younger set are graduates 
of this institution, as for instance Miss Agnes Tillman, Miss 
Lurline Matson, Miss Florence Orr. Miss Ethel Melone, Miss 
Elizabeth Mills, Miss Miriam McNear, and others. 

In further particulars it may be added that Miss Hamlin's 
School is for boarding and day pupils, and is "accredited" by 
all "accrediting institutions," both in California and in Eastern 
States. The courses of study not only follow the requirements 
for admission to the above institutions, but other courses are 
established for which, when successfully completed, the 
diploma of the school is given. In the latter case, certain 
studies are obligatory, others are elective. Special courses 
may be taken by pupils not desiring a diploma, with the con- 
sent of parents or teachers. 

The aim of the school is to tiain a pupil in the best use of her 
faculties, to develop character and to maintain a high standard 
of scholarship. In testimony of this statement, reference is 
made to the University of California, to Leland Stanford 
Junior University, and to the patrons of the school. 

The teachers in Miss Hamlin's School are college or normal 
school graduates, and are women of character and refinement. 

Each year some innovation is made, for while the school does 
not depart from methods which "have been tried and not found 
wanting," it is ready to receive new ideas and to adopt new 



^^HUl_ Ips 
755 j— ^ 


/*- — i 


l_m_-^j 


■H^WMAl 



courses of study. In addition to courses already established, 
there will be, provided a sufficient number of pupils so desire! 
a Secretarial Course, including bookkeeping, typewriting! 
stenography and commercial arithmetic. 

For young women interested in the Panama- Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition, whether members of the school or not, 
special classes will be formed for instruction upon subjects' 
of special interest, notably the art exhibitions there to be dis- 
played. Advanced courses of study in English, economics, 
psychology, parliamentary law, Christian ethics and history are 
ready for students who so desire, provided that a sufficient 
number desire them. 

Domestic science and household economics are given much 
attention. This course extends through two years, including 
one hour a week in theory and two hours of practical work in 
the kitchen-laboratory. The two years' work counts as three 
units in the admission requirements to the University of Cali- 
fornia, when taken in connection with one year of chemistry of 
five periods a week. 

The first year's work consists of the study and dietetic value 
of food materials. The treatment of food principles — starch, 
fat, protein, etc., is illustrated by the preparation of foods in 
the simpler forms and the selection, cost, care and serving of 
foods are carefully considered. 

The second year's work consists of the study and investi- 
gation of food composition and food values; use of calories and 
the study of dietaries; preparations of food in rather elabo- 
rate forms, with lessons in invalid cookery. The planning and 
serving of breakfasts, luncheons and dinners will also be 
considered. 

The location of the school is admirable and picturesque, 
overlooking the Golden Gate and the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion grounds. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




Fast Electric Trains 



TO 



Sacramento 



The Wonder Trip 

Entire line equipped with Automatic Block Signals. 
Observation cars operated. Safe — Quick. 

Oakland Antioch & Eastern Railway 

San Francisco Depot— Key Route Ferry 
Phone Sutter 2339 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavla. Telephone Park 2940. 

DENTISTS. 
W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S. r Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul 
tatlon hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attomey-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 217R 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured bv a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank PMg.. 830 Market St. Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately 217 Montgomery SL. above Bu#h. San Fran- 
-luro. CsJ. Phone PoujrlM «01 



Home building on Pacific avenue of Miss Hamlin's School 
for Girls. 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you In your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers In 
The Highest Class T Al t-IX ForOfflce Stationery 

Battery and Jackson Streets San Francisco, Cal. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




Home Rule in Ireland. 

The Home Rule amending bill introduced by the govern- 
ment does not satisfy the extremists in rebellious Ulster, or 
their backers of the Tory party. The details of the bill are 
thus summarized : 

"Areas in which a majority votes for exclusion are to be ex- 
cluded from Home Rule for six years from the first meeting 
of the Irish Parliament; that is, about seven years from now. 
The civil government of the excluded areas is to be exercised 
by the Lord Lieutenant through such officers and departments 
as may be directed by Order in Council. The Minister^ dealing 
with other Irish business which may concern the British Par- 
liament at Westminster will deal also with this; and in that 
Parliament the excluded areas will continue to be represented 
as at present. The financial problem will be devolved upon 
the Joint Board, which will make apportionment between the 
excluded and included areas. The judicial problem is solved 
by providing that residents in the excluded areas can claim to 
have their cases tried by one of the already existing Irish 
judges, or failing such a judge, by one appointed by the Crown 
under this section." 

Lord Lansdowne's reception of the measure was, however, 
very significant, in the opinion of the Daily News. Lord Lans- 
downe does not find the government's offer acceptable in its 
present form, but he scrupulously avoids bluster and the rat- 
tling of the sabre, and he recognizes that it is the duty of those 
who reject the government's scheme to offer a practicable one 
of their own. Sir Edward Carson, to be just, has a plan of his 
own — the permanent exclusion of the whole province of Ulster. 
Lord Lansdowne — surely not without design — carefully fore- 
bore to pin himself and his party down to that plan. 

"Lord Crewe, for the government, deplored exclusion, and 
Lord Lansdowne, for the Opposition, once more declared him- 
self 'entirely against exclusion as a basis of settlement.' Yet 
here is the one leader putting forward an exclusion proposal, 
and the other suggesting that the exclusion proposal should be 
made wider. Lord Lansdowne himself said, 'Any attempt to 
arrive at a final settlement of the Irish question by means of 
the separate treatment of part of the country is predestined 
to failure.' 

"That sentence in particular, and the whole tone of Lord 
Lansdowne's speech, are significant. They point straight to 
the conclusion that when the Opposition come to close quar- 
ters with the business of formulating a practicable alterna- 
tive, they must and will drop exclusion, and seek a solution 
which preserves the unity of Ireland. There are numerous 
varieties of solution fulfilling this condition, which have been, 
and can be, suggested, and we believe that the title of the 
Amending Bill was made broad precisely for this purpose — to 
allow the substitution of a unifying scheme for the scheme of 
exclusion." 

Papers like the Morning Post declare that the Bill is "a 
repetition of the Prime Minister's offer, which was contemptu- 
ously described by Sir Edward Carson as a hypocritical sham;" 
and that the Prime Minister, who no doubt earnestly desires a 
peaceful settlement, is prevented by Mr. Redmond from mak- 
ing any further concessions. The Post goes on to say that "to 
the offer of exclusion with a time limit the Ulstermen will 
never assent. They mean to have their fate settled once and 
for all." 



The Austrian Crisis. 

Apprehensions as to the immediate future in the Austro- 
Hungarian Empire has been entirely removed by the restora- 
tion of order after the riotous outbreaks that marked the ex- 
plosion of race hatred, on June 29th, when the Archduke Franz 
Ferdinand and his morganatic wife, the Duchess of Hohen- 
berg, were shot to death by a Servian, in Sarajevo, the capital 
of Bosnia-Herzegovina. The preliminary investigations into 
the authorship of the tragedy that startled the world showed 
that bombs which were thrown on the same day in an attempt 



to assassinate the heir to the crown of Austria-Hungary were 
furnished by an official of a government arsenal in Kraguje- 
vatz, in Servia, and that the young man who actually succeeded 
in laying Franz Ferdinand low had lived for a time in the 
Servian capital, and that he had been in touch with leaders in 
the nationalist movement, not only in Belgrade, but also in 
Bosnia-Herzegovina. 

Subsequent inquiries into the tragedy of Sarajevo indicated 
with certainty that the assassination was prompted by a politi- 
cal motive, and that it was an expression of the discontent of 
the Servian people with the present status of Bosnia and Her- 
zegovina, which were annexed to Austria in 1908, after they 
had been in occupation by Austro-Hungarian forces since 1878, 
under the mandate of the congress of Berlin, which fixed the 
boundaries of the Balkan States after the Russo-Turkish war. 
The act of annexation was laid by the dissatisfied Serbs at the 
door of the archduke, who for the past ten years had been an 
increasingly powerful factor in the administration of their 
Austrian rulers. The utterances of the unofficial Servian press 
on the incident betoken ill concealed satisfaction with the sum- 
mary method of giving voice to political discontent. 



Hindus in Canada. 

The color question grows steadily more serious for the Brit- 
ish empire, and there will be anxious interest in the case of the 
Hindu who was ordered deported from Vancouver by the head 
of the immigration department. Upon that case will depend 
the fate of hundreds of other Indians who are detained there, 
and perhaps much more than that will depend on the issue. 
India has taken the matter deeply to heart. Education has 
spread British ideas of liberty and justice, which the English 
freely preach, but are not so ready to apply to subject races. 
At the same time imperialism has spread a sense of the glory 
of empire, and the dignity of being a British subject. It is the 
greater shock to the Indians to find that "civis Britannicus" 
has not what the pragmatists would call "cash value," that the 
color line is drawn against British subjects when they wish to 
go to another part of the empire. And unless some way of 
circumventing that difficulty can be found, it may yet spell dis- 
aster to the empire. 



DAVID FARQUH ARSON. 

David Farquharson died at his residence in this city last Sun- 
day at the advanced age of 87 years. Mr. Farquharson was 
much respected as an architect and banker, and enjoyed un- 
bounded popularity among the business men of the city, and 
was unanimously nominated for the office of Mayor on the 
ticket of the New Constitution party in 1879. This was the 
only occasion on which he took an active part in politics. He 
was a native of Scotland, and the father of Charles D. Farqu- 
harson. For forty years Mr. Farquharson was president of the 
California Savings and Loan Society, and he was the architect 
of many of the city's finest buildings. 

Among the important buildings of the city before the fire 
designed by Mr. Farquharson were the Bank of California, 
the Nevada Block, the San Francisco Stock Exchange, the 
London and San Francisco Bank, the Fireman's Fund Building 
and the Thurlow Block. He was an honorary member of the 
American Institute of Architects. 



The judicious epicure, in the course of his explora- 
tions among the noted restaurants of San Francisco finds noth- 
ing better in the way of good things to eat, served in the most 
dainty fashion, than the Vienna Cafe, 171 O'Farrell street, 
near Powell. Observe, this house is in the heart of the busi- 
ness quarter, convenient to all the big theatres and the great 
shopping places. Now if the epicure is a lady or a gentleman 
she or he will find the Vienna Cafe a good place to drop in 
for lunch or have dinner before going to the play or supper 
afterwards. At any of these seasons of refreshment, the judi- 
cious epicure will not be disappointed by the good cheer served 
at the Vienna Cafe. 



"I'll never speak to you again as long as I live," ex- 
claimed the temperamental girl. "Haw! Haw!" rejoined the 
practical youth. "You can't help yourself. I've got some of 
your songs and recitations on my phonograph." — Washington 
Star. 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

{NOTICE. — The Motoring Magazine Section is supplied in 
place of the Automobile Department this week. This issue is 
special, and the number of copies distributed is doubled. Every 
copy of this issue dated July 25th contains a copy of the Motor- 
ing Magazine Section. — Editor.) 

Oakland Car Used on Run 

The interesting run to San Juan Bautista during the feast of 
the Pentecost by the staff of the News Letter, and which is de- 
scribed in this month's issue of Motoring Magazine, was made 
in the Oakland car as the guests of Manager Arthur Bunker. 
The run of two hundred miles was easily made in one day, 
leaving lots of time to enjoy the noon-day meal in the Mis- 
sion town. No trouble whatsoever was experienced from the 
start to finish. 

Olympic Club at San Jose 

The annual automobile run of the Olympic Club this year 
was to San Jose. The number of owners who took part in the 
club event were more than repaid for their trouble. It was a 
most delightful affair, and the Garden City enthusiasts turned 
the town over to the visitors. After the big feed, the mem- 
bers started for home over the different routes, some even go- 
ing as far south as Del Monte, Santa Cruz, before returning 
northward. There is no outing that the club runs that seems 

to give more pleasure than this event. 

* * • 

Short Cut to Sacramento 

The trip by automobile from San Francisco, Oakland, or, 
in fact, any of the bay city points, can be made direct to Sac- 
ramento via Davis and over the tule lands, and that the long 
detour to Stockton need not be taken. This road to Sacra- 
mento is now open, as the bridge across the slough between 
Sacramento and Davis in the tule country has been completed. 
This means that automobile traffic now can go in either direc- 
tion between San Francisco and Sacramento, and the upper 
Sacramento Valley points direct, saving the motorists quite a 

number of miles of travel. 

* * * 

Auto and the Pedestrian 

San Francisco motorists are studying a decision of far-reach- 
ing effect, defining the rights of the motorist and pedestrian. 
The judicial opinion was rendered in a Philadelphia court, but 
the principles involved apply to every city in the United States. 
Here is what the court said : "Motor cars in a short time have 
practically displaced horses for ordinary traffic. The first con- 
sequence is that the ancient right of the people to cross a city 
street at any point must be qualified by the doctrine that be- 
tween crossings the right of way belongs to the vehicle, and 
that the pedestrian must recognize this at his risk. 

"There is, however, a second consequence. Streets must be 
crossed, and there must be a reasonable provision for crossing 
them in safety Therefore, we must recognize the intersection 
as such crossing point. At such intersections, the pedestrians 
must have the right of way, and the driver of the vehicle must 

recognize this right at his risk." 

* * * 

Motor 'Bus Vibration 

The effect of motor 'bus vibration, which threatens the 
safety of such giant landmarks as St. Paul's Cathedral, West- 
minster Abbey and the clock tower of the House of Commons, 
London, is being made the subject of careful tests by the 
National Physical Laboratory. Investigators have learned 
through delicate instruments placed in these buildings that the 
amount of vibration is largely a matter of speed of the 'buses. 



When three 'buses were driven past the cathedral at six miles 
an hour no disturbance was recorded. But at twelve miles an 
hour the vibration was marked. Both vertical and horizontal 
movements were noted. Plans for a system of steel supports 
have already been found necessary for St. Paul's, owing to the 
disintegrating effects of a traffic on which Sir Christopher 
Wren did not reckon. 

v • * 

New Plerce-Arrow 

W. F. Culberson, Western distributer for the Pierce-Arrow 
line, has announced the new 1915 model which features a low 
body and a number of other refinements in what is designated 
as "Series Three." The latest types of this well known car 
include three models, rated at 66, 48 and 38 horsepower, but 
all with six-cylinder motors. The most radical difference be- 
tween the new and previous models is the lowering of the body 

Without reducing the road clearance, it has been found pos- 
sible to lower the bodies and running boards of the central por- 
tion of the frame. This change has made it necessary to aban- 
don the gravity fuel feed to the engine, and to substitute a 
pressure feed with a gasoline tank at the rear of the chassis. 

Two independent systems of ignition are used, while the 
electric lighting and starting systems are both wired with a 
single wire system. The starting motor is entirely independ- 
ent of the generator. The new machines are better in appear- 
ance than the old, and more efficient. 

The Pierce factory was one of the first of the large manufac- 
turers to adopt the six-cylinder type of motor exclusively, and 
on account of the prominence of these cars, the factory, an- 
nual announcement is of unusual interest to motor enthusiasts. 
According to Culberson, a number of advance orders have 
already been received for early deliveries of the new ma- 
chines. 

• * * 

The Englebert Tyres 

Costello-Lang Company has been receiving some splendid 
reports of the service gained from the Englebert tyre. The 
tire, which is built in Belgium, is noted for the fact that it does 
not blow out, and gives 10,000 miles service. 




POWERFUL THREE 
TON TRUCK 

In Perfect Condition. Cost 

$3,650 

Will be Sold for 

$1,500 

if purchased before Tuesday, 
July 28, 1914. 

Owner deceased, widow 
needs cash immediately. 



ADDRESS 

Box 200 — San Francisco News Letter 
21 Sutter Street, San Francisco 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




R. K. Roberts, who has been appointed Assistant General 
Sales Manager of the Oakland Motor Car Company. 

Roberta Changes 

R. K. Roberts, general manager of the Howa-rd Automobile 
Company, has been appointed assistant general sales manager 
of the Oakland Motor Car Company, of Michigan. Roberts 
has been identified with the Howard Company since 1907, and 
the change was a great surprise to the trade. 

Roberts, in speaking of the change, says: "It is with re- 
luctance that I leave the Howard Automobile Company. My 
business relations with C. S. Howard have been such the last 
seven years that I pondered for hours over the flattering offer 
of the Oakland Company before I could bring myself to sever 
my connections with Howard and his company. I absolutely 
know it will be impossible for me to ever be more pleasantly 
situated than I have been with the Pacific Coast Buick dis- 
tributers. 

"These pleasant relations have extended even to the Buick 
factory, and it is through this channel I received the offer. 
Charles W. Nash, who is general manager of the Oakland Mo- 
tor Car Company of Michigan, is also president of the General 
Motor Company, which not only owns the Oakland plant, but 
also the Buick, Cadillac and several other popular makes of 
cars. General Sales Manager Fred W. Warner, of the Oak- 
land Company, before joining this organization, was promi- 
nently identified with the Buick interests. 

"So, while I am making a change, yet at the same time I am 
identified with interests with which I have had dealings for 
the last seven years. 

"In severing my connection with the Howard Automobile 
Company, I feel I am doing so with the best wishes of Chas. 
S. Howard, and if I did not think so, I. would never have made 
the change of my own volition. We will be working along the 
same lines, for while we have our personal interests, we have 
at the same time the interests of the General Motor Company 
to consider. 

"In regard to the new models of Oakland cars which will 
be brought out later in the season, little can be said at this 
time except that as Charles W. Nash is taking a personal in- 
terest in the output, one may feel well assured that the new 
models will reach the highest state of perfection that advanced 



designing and unlimited capital can produce. I absolutely 
know from experience that it is going to be our greatest trouble 
to find ways and means to fill demands after these cars ap- 
pear." 

* * * 

Take Care of Rima 

"Rims appear to be a small, unpretentious part of the auto- 
mobile, yet if neglected, are a very expensive necessity," says 
R. L. Sergeant, of the Fisk Rubber Company. 

"Don't ride on the rims without sufficient air pressure in 
the tires. 

"Don't ride with casing on rims that are not true. 

"Don't fail to use a pressure gauge, as it will save rim cut- 
ting 

"Don't fail to keep the rim free from rust at all times. 

"Don't attempt to re-varnish rims, however, until every trace 
of rust is removed, and also see that the rim is neither dented 
nor rough. 

"Don't ride on car tracks or in deep ruts, as it wears out the 
rim very rapidly, and causes the rim to become rough and 
ragged. 

"Don't fail, after coming in from a long journey, particularly 
if the weather has been rainy or slushy, to sponge the rim 
clean and then wipe dry, as this will do much to prevent rust. 

"Don't use anything but black varnish. It is a little expen- 
sive, but the cheapest in the long run. 

"Don't use a file to smooth off roughened rims; use coarse 
emery paper, and then finish off with fine emery paper. 

"Don't hesitate to inspect the rims at frequent intervals, as 

a little attention will insure longer service." 

* * * 

Post Signs 

Fifty signs pointing the way to Los Angeles have been 
posted along the Lincoln Highway by W. C. Dungan, who is 
making the transcontinental trip in his Pierce-Arrow. When 
Duncan left, his car was equipped with Lee tires. He agreed 
to post the signs for Phil Lyon, and in a letter received from 
the tourist recently, he stated that all the signs were up in the 
most conspicuous places he could find. He also stated that he 
was having a fine trip, and to date had experienced no trouble 

whatever. 

* * * 

Tires and Wire Wheels 

"Comparative records kept by a company of London, on its 
vehicles, covering nearly 300,000 miles of tire use, equally 
divided between wooden and wire wheels, show that the wire 
wheels afforded an increased tire mileage of 68.75 per cent 
over the wooden type," says H. D. McCoy, of Chanslor & 
Lyon Company, agents for the Rudge-Withworth wire wheels. 

"Non-skid tire covers, 935x135, were used, fifty on each type 
of wheel. Each cover on wire wheel averaged 3,454 miles; 
those on the wooden wheels averaging 2,050 miles. 

"The cars used being identical, except as to wheels, the re- 
sult showed a saving of over four cents per mile on tire bills. 
Resiliency, lightness, less periphery weight, and coolness, all 

tend to reduce tire stresses." 

* • • 

Corn and the Auto 

"It doesn't hurt to own the corn occasionally," says Sales 
Manager G. C. Frey, of the Kissel-Kar, "and I must confess 
that we greatly underestimated the demand for the new two- 
door body design, and consequently were obliged to turn down 
many orders specifying immediate delivery of the 48 'six' so 
equipped. We know now, however, that this style is a com- 
plete success, and are building accordingly. It will be optional 

on all our models hereafter." 

* * * 

Weight Counts Id Tire Wear 

The mileage obtained from automobile tires depends largely 
upon the way the car is driven, and the load the tires carry. In 
speaking on this subject, Samuel Crim, Velie agent, says : 

"In the Velie for 1915, weight has been worked out, and Ve- 
lie engineers have gone at the problem in the right sort of a 
way. Notably light weight with superior strength has been 
secured by the proper use of high grade materials. Bulk and 
weight avoided, and superior strength is secured. Heavy 
weight as an argument for strength no longer commands at- 
tention." 



July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



By Way of Feather River 

A strong movement has been started to have the Lincoln 
ocean-to-ocean highway cross the Sierra Nevada Mountains 
from Nevada over the Beckwith Pass and down the Feather 
River Canyon into California. The route leads through a rich 
placer mining region, gradually climbing to a higher altitude 
and into the heart of a rich orange and olive producing section, 
and then again, within a few miles, one is motoring in a virgin 
forest of white and sugar pine, and then one has the sixty- 
nine mile trip from Oroville to Quincy, from which place on 
into Reno the scenery, while becoming less attractive, is never- 
theless interesting through contrast. 

A Buick pathfinding crew in charge of Claud McGee and 
Fred Gross, of the Howard Automobile Company, went over 
the path recently, and took this means to introduce this attrac- 
tive mountain touring ground to the motoring public. 

The Feather River country is certainly going to attract 
scores of motoring parties for the remainder of the season, and 
the tour books of the future are going to log this route as one 
of the most interesting of the many splendid scenic sections in 

which the motorists can safely tour in California. 

* * * 

1915 Marmons 

The latest announcement by the Nordyke & Marmon Com- 
pany is the specifications for the 1915 Marmon car, which will 
soon be on display at the salesrooms of Walter Morris, the 
local Marmon agent. The latest practices in automobile de- 
sign have been incorporated in the new Marmon car, which is 
called the Marmon model "forty-one." 

The motor is made up of six cylinders cast in blocks of 
three and water cooled. The body has an attractive stream- 
line effect, with sloping hood, crowned fenders and rounded 
radiator. To provide additional ventilation, the front doors 
open from the forward edge. Bodies are constructed of sheet 
steel, and are superior both in quality and workmanship. The 
upholstery is deep and soft, with a wider tufting, and the body 
has slightly higher sides than the previous models. The front 
running board is brought about by removing the tool and lug- 
gage boxes from the forward end of running board. Ingenious 
provision is made under the front seat of the body and else- 
where for storing tools, curtains, etc. 

* * * 

Firestone Tires on Racers 

"On July 3d and 4th, race fans and others in Tacoma, and 
for hundreds of miles around, were treated to some speedy 
driving which they will not soon forget. The Montamara 
Festo road races furnished the excitement," says W. H. Bell, 
Pacific Coast manager of the Firestone Tire and Rubber Com- 
pany. "No graded track with saucer turns helped the motor- 
ists in this race. Public roads constituted the speedway. The 
races consisted of three events — a 100 mile race, a 200 mile 
race and a 25 mile event. 

"If tires were ever put to the test they were in this race. 
The first race was won by Jim Parson, at an average speed of 
73.63 miles an hour. The second race was a draw between 
Cooper and Hughes. The third and most important was a 
250 mile race, won by Cooper at an average speed of 73.53 
miles an hour. Firestone tires weie used by Jim Parsons and 
Cooper, and they attributed their successes to the wonderful 

endurance of their tires." 

* * * 

One on the "Cop" 

"It is not always those who travel the straight and narrow 
path that avoid trouble," says J. W. Leavitt, the head of J. W. 
Leavitt & Company, coast distributers for the Overland cars. 

"At least that has been my experience lately. A couple of 
weeks ago, in coming down from Cloverdale in my car with a 
party of friends, I proceeded to demonstrate that the State 
speed law was sufficient for all purposes of the automobilists. 
That a speed limit of thirty miles an hour in open country and 
twenty in town was liberal and just. 

"On leaving Cloverdale, we laid out a schedule according to 
the State laws, and held to it all the way down. At every town 
we touched, we scheduled just to the minute. On leaving Peta- 
luma, we figured a thirty mile pace to San Rafael, and one can 
imagine our surprise when about two miles out from the latter 
place we were stopped and arrested for speeding. We all pro- 
tested, telling the deputy sheriff that we had not exceeded the 
speed limit, but had run according to schedule, in fact we had 
run from Petaluma to the point where we were arrested in just 



thirty-eight minutes. 

"The deputy sheriff, which proved to be J. C. Donohue, in- 
formed us that on our own statement we had exceeded the 
speed limit inasmuch that the distance from Petaluma to the 
point where he was, was nineteen miles. Just a thirty mile 
clip was impossible, considering the turns and grades between 
the two points, for any car to make it on the level without ex- 
ceeding the speed limit. He informed us that we would have 
to tell the Justice of the Peace in San Rafael our story, that in 
his mind we had exceeded the speed limit. A day was set for 
our trial, and on that occasion I appeared before the Justice of 
the Peace, W. F. Magee. I asked postponement of action with 
the privilege of proving to Deputy Sheriff Donohue that my 
statement of running thirty miles an hour between the two 
points was true. Both the Justice of the Peace and Donohue 
were most liberal in their treatment of me, and said that if I 
could prove to Deputy Sheriff Donohue that it was possible 
for me to cover the distance between San Rafael and the point 
named as I claimed, that my case would be made. A few 
days later I drove to San Rafael, and picked up Deputy Sheriff 
Donohue; then we re-traced my steps to Petaluma, covering 
the distance in dispute in forty minutes. We turned around 
there, and started back. 

"I placed the speedometer hand at thirty miles an hour, and 
kept that rate of travel up until we reached the point where the 
arrest had been made. The watches showed just thirty-eight 
minutes, and at that point the odometer dropped over at nine- 
teen miles. It was a revelation to Deputy Sheriff Donohue. 
We had taken the level road, the turns, and the grades at thirty 
miles an hour, never exceeding that rate of speed, and the 
demonstration was satisfactory to him, which resulted in a 
dismissal of the case." 

* * * 

Goodrich Signs 

"From Cape Cod to the Golden Gate, and from Michigan to 
Florida, the B. F. Goodrich Company's touring bureau has 
covered the country with sign posts to guide the motorist on 
his way. Not only that, but the Goodrich Touring Bureau has 
mapped almost every good road in the country, and put its vast 
collection of data, relating to routes and touring information, in 
its famous Route Books, which are now ready to distribute 
free. Year by year this service, the only one of its kind in 
the world, has been extended till now, 1914, will see 300,000 
miles of the best touring routes in this country, Canada and 
Europe plotted so that motorists can go anywhere they want to 
and have a safe and sure guide all the way either with a Route 
Book for the section, or by the road markers, which have been 

set up to the number of 45,000 or more. 

* * * 

Woods Mobile tte Distributors 

International Cyclecar and Accessories Company has 
been recently incorporated, with an authorized stock issue of 
$5,000,000. If the plans that have been determined upon are 
carried out, this company will probably be the most effective 
and influential in the cyclecar industry. The purposes of the 
company include the general distribution of Woods Mobilette, 
"America's First Cyclecar;" also other productions of the 
Woods Mobilette Company's big plant at Harvey, 111. The 
company will also handle a general line of cyclecar parts, as- 
semblies and accessories, marketing only such productions of 
Ihe various kinds as possess unquestioned integrity and for 
which a large demand must develop as the industry grows. The 
policy of the company will be to do business direct with the 
local dealer, and through him with the consumer, all inter- 
mediate interests being eliminated. It is said that the com- 
pany has already received more than 10,000 applications from 
motor vehicle dealers who are anxious to be among the chosen 
ones to become a part of a large and comprehensive system for 

distribution. 

* » * 

Federal Rubber Anniversary 

The third anniversary of the Federal Rubber Manufacturing 
Company of Milwaukee recently was fittingly celebrated by 
the officials issuing orders for the erection of new factory build- 
ings to cost over $500,000. Work is already under way on the 
new structures, which will be in the form of added units to the 
present plan. When completed, the new buildings will mean 
an increase of 150,000 square feet of floor space, making 450,- 
000 square feet in the entire factory. 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 




JINSVMCIi 




Midland Casualty Issues New Industrial Policy. 

The Midland Casualty Company has just issued a new and 
up-to-date industrial policy which will be found by its agents to 
be an easy seller. The company has eliminated practically all 
of the objectionable features heretofore contained in all indus- 
trial policies, and has made this new policy a Life Indemnity 
contract; broadened the illness provision and added Optional 
Indemnities. Industrial agents should make inquires at once 
regarding this new policy. The company has just reported 
a 21 per cent increase in the industrial and commercial pre- 
miums for the first six months of 1914 over a similar period 
of 1913. The Midland is represented in San Francisco by 

Edward P. F'sh & Son. 

* * * 

Presentation to Thos. H. Anderson. 

During his recent visit to his former home at New Orleans 
to make arrangements for the transfer of his family and effects, 
to San Francisco, Thos. H. Anderson, recently appointed as- 
sistant manager of the Liverpool & London & Globe's Pacific 
Department, was presented by his old friends in the Southern 
city with a handsome chest of silver. Mr. Anderson has taken 

up a residence in Berkeley. 

* * * 

The Standard Fire of Hartford, represented in the Pacific 
field by S. C. Kinney, with headquarters at San Francisco, has 

increased its capital stock from $500,000 to $1,000,000. 

* * * 

John James, an insurance man, succeeds Willard Done as 
insurance commissioner for the State of 
Utah. Mr. James began his business ca- 
reer as a newspaper man, afterwards 




A GOOD JUDGE 



of fine whiskey will pronounce 



HUNTER 



BALTIMORE 



RYE 



a perfect product of the still, 
because whiskey cannot be more 
carefully made, aged and perfected 

Sold at all first-class cafes and by jobbers. 
WM. LANAI1AN & SON, Baltimore, Md. 




the Travelers, twenty-five hundred with the Prudential, and 
ten thousand with the New York Life. The Travelers, an acci- 
dent policy, has been paid. 

* * * 

The First National Life of Tacoma, has absorbed the Ameri- 
can Life and Accident of Portland. The First National has 
been writing life only, the Portland Company accident and 

health. 

* * * 

A. P. Lange, recently called to New York as superintendent 
of agencies for the Fidelity-Phenix, is an old time special 



drifting into the business of insurance. 
He has seen service with the Travelers 
and Columbian National, and for a time 
was connected with the Anderson Insur- 
ance Agency, writing all lines. 

* * * 

The Indemnity Exchange, a county 
mutual of Los Angeles, organized in 1913 
by A. M. Warren, and which has been 
writing a limited fire insurance business 
since that date, has been ordered to 
cease business by Insurance Commis- 
sioner Phelps. Its affairs are alleged to 
be hopelessly entangled. 

* * * 

H. F. Risbrough, who, during a seven 
years' connection with the office, has 
made himself quite popular, has been re- 
appointed deputy insurance commissioner 
for the State of California by J. E. 
Phelps, the new insurance commissioner. 
Mr. Risbrough is thoroughly acquainted 
with the office, and has made himself 
very popular with all classes. 

* * * 

The California Mutual Life, an assess- 
ment concern organized by the Van Dooz- 
ers of San Francisco, has made applica- 
tion for a California license. It is 
claimed that the $5,000 guarantee fund 
and 200 charter members required by 
law have been secured. 

* * * 

Eva Jane Rhinehart, a nurse, twenty- 
two years old, has been arrested on the 
charge of murdering her business part- 
ner, Mrs. Katherine Fitzgerald Bluett, by 
poisoning at Auburn, Cal., last January, to 
secure the insurance on the latter's life. 
Mrs. Bluett carried three thousand with 



Trusting to Memory 



GOOD telephone service depends vitally upon 
care in calling telephone numbers. A wrong 
number called causes loss of time to you, to 
the party called and to the operator. Every instance 
means inconvenience to all concerned, which is 
wholly avoidable. 

It is not the loss of time to you alone or to the 
operator that concerns us most, but it is the annoy- 
ance to the party called. Your mistake cannot be 
explained to him, and the Telephone Company is 
held responsible for your error. 

Consulting the current issue of the telephone 
directory, instead of trusting to memory; giving your 
number clearly, and quickly correcting the operator 
if she misunderstands your call, will greatly increase 
the efficiency of the service. 



The Pacific Telephone 
& Telegraph Co. 





July 25, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



agent known all over the Pacific Coast. For the past ten years 
he has represented the Fidelity-Underwriters in the Pacific 
Northwest. 

* * » 

The city advisory water committee will this week send a 
letter to the Spring Valley Water Company of San Francisco 
to start the ball rolling for the acquisition of the Spring Valley 
plant by the city. The company will be sounded as to its will- 
ingness to accept the proposition as outlined in the letter, to 
sell at approximately $34,500,000. The city will, on acquiring 
its portion of the Lake Merced lands, assume its proportion 
of the Twin Peaks tunnel tax on this property. The company 
will be allowed to keep most of the Merced lands, and will re- 
imburse the company for its outlay on the Calaveras dam, and 
a division of the money impounded in the Spring Valley rate 
case will be arranged. 

* * * 

A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Samuel H. Gil- 
bert, who is accused of embezzlement. He is said to be short 
nearly $12,000 in his accounts, with several insurance com- 
panies, life, casualty and fire. Careless bookkeeping is alleged 
to be the cause of his difficulty. It is not believed that any 

of the money was used for his private affairs. 

* * * 

Mayor Otis, of Alameda, has devised a plan for the city to 
establish an insurance fund to protect municipal employees. 
Those connected with the electricity department are the only 
ones at present insured. The insurance of these employees 
costs the city over $2,000 per annum for policies written in 
the State insurance fund. The city council will consider the 
matter at an early date. 

On account of unsatisfactory experience, the Fireman's Fund 
has circularized its agents in portions of Missouri to cease 
writing business located at a distance from the agency. The 
company, however, is permitting present policies to remain in 

force until expiration. 

» * • 

Special agents traveling in the Mountain Field to the num- 
ber of fifty or more, will enjoy a trip to the Yellowstone Na- 
tional Park on August 21st. They will leave Livingston, Mont., 
Friday afternoon, and return on the following morning. The 
committee of arrangements has secured the very low rate of 
$26.25 for the round trip, including all expenses. The Wash- 
ington Pond of Blue Goose will hold an initiation at the Canyon 

Hotel. 

* * * 

Portland, Ore., has experienced its third disastrous dock fire 
within a year. The destruction of the Oceanic dock entailed a 
loss of $150,000, all covered by insurance. Twenty-five hun- 
dred tons of wheat and five thousand tons of barley either 
burned or fell into the river. It is believed that a considerable 

salvage can be effected on this. 

* • * 

Insurance Commissioner Ferguson, of Oregon, after studying 
conditions in that State, has reached the conclusion that rates 
for fire insurance are as low as they should be. In his annual 
report he says : "Fire losses appear to have been above the 
normal ratio, and many of the stock companies and most of 
our mutual associations show their disbursements to have been 
in excess of their income in this territory. Such results may 
be due partly to the considerable reduction of rates, and, con- 
sequently, the premium income of companies. The fire insur- 
ance rates have evidently been reduced to a point where further 
reductions cannot be expected except for the reduction of 
hazard in risks." 



Uplifter — I can see good in all things. Pat — Can you 

see good in a fog? — Judge. 



HONOLULU JAPAN CHINA PHILIPPINES 

VIA "THE SUNSHINE BELT" 

S. S. Mongolia — Sails — August 8th 

CHOICE ACCOMMODATIONS STILL AVAILABLE 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP CO. 

384 Flood Building. San Franciaco 



PHONE 
KEARNY 3620 



Fire and Automobile Insurance 

Ample Facilities for Handling Large Lines 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

W1LL1AMSBURGH CITY FIRE INS. CO. - Organized 1853 

MERCHANTS FIRE ASSURANCE CORPORATION, Organized 1910 
UNITED STATES FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, Organized 1824 
NEW BRUNSWICK FIRE INSURANCE CO. - Organized 1826 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE CO. - . Organized 1822 

WM. W. ALVERSON, Manager 

374 Pine Street, San Franciaco, California 

SPECIAL AGENTS 

R. R. ROPER, San Franciaco A. M. LOVELACE, Portland 

T. J. KELEHER, Loa Angelea W. T. BOOTH, Spokane 



1914 



1863 

FIFTY- FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 



Capital $1,500,000 



Assets, $10,000,000 



FIRE 



MARINE AUTOMOBILE 



California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability. Teams, Elevator. Workmen's 
Collective. Vessels. Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance. Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Miller. President: L. B. Hoge. General Manager Accident an 
Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants' Exchange Building. San Francisco 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

CHARTERED 1850 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

The Insurance Exchange, San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager Guy Francis, Asst. Manager 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

BAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 

The Home Insurance Company 



Organized 186S. 



Cash Capital. $3,000,000 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners any- 
where in United States. Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss by 
fire. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity for loss of rental Income by fire. 
H. L. ROFF. General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN. An't General Agent 

321 Sansome Street. Sen Francisco, Csl- 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



Members 



f New 

J New 

I C.hK-i 

I The 



MILLS BUILDING 

.nd 

PALACE HOTEL 



York Stock Exchange 
York Cotton Exrh.nre 
Chie.ro Bo.rd of Tr.de 

Slock and Bond Exchange. S.n Francisco 



Branch Offices 



San Diego 
Portland Ore 
Waak. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



July 25, 1914. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

(Continued from Page 7.) 
The Multiplication of Police. 

How many kinds of police have we got in the State of Cali- 
fornia? I don't refer so much to the plain policeman of com- 
merce, known in polite circles as the "harness bull." I speak 
of the specialized police who call themselves inspectors, or 
some other fanciful title. There is a constant demand for 
more and more of these. For instance, at the recent State 
fruit growers' convention, held at the University farm at Davis, 
Fred Maskew, quarantine inspector at this port for the State 
Horticultural Commission, was quoted : 

"The Horticultural Commission has about 100 wardens, spe- 
cial deputies, and other officers, to handle its work of inspec- 
tion of all packages coming into the State to keep out the pests 
and blights, dangerous to the fruit crops. The State Fish and 
Game Commission has a force of 773 similar officers to enforce 
the laws in that department," said Maskew. "With the lim- 
ited amount of help to watch the 1,792 places of entry into the 
State, it is practically impossible to do effective work and ob- 
tain the results desired. Over 152,000 packages came into the 
port of San Francisco from foreign ports during 1913, an aver- 
age of more than 4,000 each month. While the customs officers 
help materially in the work, the immensity of the project is 
beyond the control of the present force." 
S V ~5 

The Bug Police. 

Doubtless Mr. Maskew's bug police fulfill a useful function, 
but like other officials, he is inclined to magnify his office 
Perhaps he is not to be blamed when he sees the luxurious 
provision made for the Fish and Game Commission, which is 
able to employ 700 or more policemen to watch the ducks and 
geese. There appears to be no end to this sort of thing, and I 
read in the Colusa Sun: 

"Information is given out to-day that State detectives 
are quietly at work in various parts of California, and 
may visit Colusa County at any time to see that the new 
automobile law is not being violated, either with regard 
to driving rules or the matter of licenses. These officers 
have been notified to require a strict compliance with the 
provisions of the law, and they are making no discrimina- 
tion between offenders. One is just as likely to be arrested 
for driving on the wrong side of the street or turning 
around in the middle of the block as for driving a car 
without a license. State detectives are also strict in regard 
to chauffeurs having the necessary license. The officers 
are determined that the new law shall be strictly enforced, 
and autoists who are not familiar with the provisions of 
the new law will do well to study the measure and learn 
just what is required of them." 

I do not vouch for the foregoing information, but it is quite 
in line with the prevailing tendency to multiply police varieties. 
The Federal Government maintains a standing army of sleuths 
of 57 different kinds that exceeds in number the regular mili- 
tary forces of the nation. There are more coming. The collec- 
tion of the income tax will involve the employment of a con- 
siderable addition to the roll of government spies. In fact, we 
are only beginning on this business because the rage for pro- 
hibitory and regulative legislation involves the creation of more 
and more policemen. Remember that every prohibitory law 
and every form of regulation necessitates the creation of a new 
kind of special police to make them effective. We appear to 
be approaching a time when one-half the nation will make a 
living by watching the other half. 



SUMMER DAYS AT SANTA CRUZ. 

Time was when one said, "All roads lead to Rome," but now 
it can almost be said that all roads lead to Santa Cruz, the way 
the crowds have been piling in the last few days. 

The reduced rates at the Casa del Rey, Cottage City, and 
Grill, have undoubtedly had a large share in bringing the 
crowds to Santa Cruz this season, for while travel is light to 
most of the resorts throughout the country, Santa Cruz has more 
people than for years past. 

An innovation this year has been a series of free entertain- 
ments on the beach, those last week being "The Clacks," a 
splendid team of aerial artists and contortionists, and this week 
being free moving pictures, the best that money can buy. These 
features have proven very popular to the crowds that throng 
the beach, and many new ones are in prospect. 

A warm sun and a clear sky have made the days here one 
endless delight, rendered not too warm by the cool ocean 
breezes. The hundreds in the surf and plunge and on the sands 
all bear witness to the popularity of our sea coast sites, while 
the bands of happy kiddies, frolicking at the water's edge, and 
in the warm sands, tell all who see them of the perfect health 
and happiness which will result from their summer visit to 
Santa Cruz. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



OBITUARY. 
F. W. Dohrmann. 

Frederick W. Dohrmann, head of the Nathan Dohrmann 
Company, and a leading figure in San Francisco civic affairs, 
died last Saturday at his home, 1815 California street. Death 
v/as due to heart failure. Dohrmann was 70 years of age. He 
leaves three children, Mrs. Minna Dohrmann Pischel, A. B. C. 
Dohrmann, and F. Dohrmann, Jr., and one sister, Mrs. Blanca 
Paulsen. 

Born in Schleswig-Holstein on November 17, 1842, Dohr- 
mann came to this country in 1858, at the age of fifteen. He 
obtained employment as a clerk at Davenport, Iowa, remaining 
there until he left for San Francisco, going via the Isthmus of 
Panama and arriving on April 1, 1862. 

Dohrmann, with M. H. Hecht, and others, organized the 
present Emporium Company in July, 1897, and for several 
years past was president of that concern. He was one of the 
organizers of the San Francisco Hotel Company, operating the 
St. Francis Hotel, in May, 1901, and up to his death was vice- 
president and director. 

Dohrmann was interested in the Red Cross Society, the Ger- 
man Benevolent Society and the German Altenheim. He was 
a member of the committee on indorsement of charitable insti- 
tutions, and also an active member of the Associated Charities. 
Dohrmann was one of the founders and a charter member of 
the Merchants' Association of San Francisco. He was one of 
the founders of the San Francisco Charter Association in 1897, 
and vice-president of the committee of one hundred which for- 
mulated the present charter. He was made a member of the 
Park Commission by Mayor Taylor in 1909, and was president 
of that body when removed by Mayor McCarthy in 1910. 

Dohrmann was made a regent of the University of California 
in 1903, and remained an active member of that board until his 
death. His banking interests included a directorship in the 
Savings Union Bank and Trust Company of San Francisco. 

* * * 
Mrs. Mary Kincaid. 

Mrs. Mary Kincaid, a member of the San Francisco Board of 
Education, died on Sunday last at her home on Pacific avenue. 
Mrs. Kincaid was 69 years old, and death was due to a com- 
plication of ills. She leaves a son, George Frank Kincaid, and 
a granddaughter, Miss Dorothy Kincaid, besides two sisters, 
Mrs. George Holmes and Mrs. Wm. Witham. Mrs. Kincaid's 
career as an educator began years ago, when, after graduating 
from a finishing school in Benicia, she took up teaching in the 
San Francisco public schools. The two grammar schools in 
which she taught were the Lincoln and South Cosmopolitan. 
She was principal of the Girl's High School, then president of 
the San Francisco State Normal School. When she retired 
from this latter post she went to Europe for five or six years. 
Her first appointment to the Board of Education came shortly 
after her return to this city. She served on the board under 
Mayor Phelan in 1897. In 1909 she was reappointed by Mayor 
Taylor, and she has been a member ever since. 








11,1 1 i 



>eH 



THE MOOSE GROWS A HUMP 



TONE 



that is not the only reason why you 
should buy a Columbia Grafonola 



The Columbia tone is a result 
— and the Columbia Grafonola 
embodies the causes in its me- 
chanical and structural superi- 
ority; in the form and construc- 
tion of its tone chamber and its 
reproducer and tone-arm; in its 
silent and powerful motor; in 
its tone-control "leaves" which 
have supplanted the old idea of 
"doors," and in the expert and 
workmanlike assembling of all 
its parts and down to every last 
detail of its cabinet work. 



Ask any Columbia dealer to 
show you the Columbia Graf- 
onola "Leader" — price $75. Or 
he will send a "Leader" with an 



_j $75. Or 
he will send a "Leader" with an 
outfit of records to your home 

on annroval. 



on approval. 



Convenient terms of pur- 
chase may be arranged. 





COLUMBIA 



GRAPHOPHONE COMPANY 

334 SUTTER ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

COLUMBIA DEALERS EVERYWHERE 




tiUWUhfrf I rty lO I&U 




_ IfER 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, August 1, 1914 



No. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3694. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Geo. Hische, 1310 Westminster, Westminster Building, 
Chicago. 

London Office — George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. 

Matter intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, $2.26. 
Foreign— 1 year. 16.00; 6 months, 13.26. 



Berkeley claims a population of 52,000. 

The Tom Finn reformers are once more active. 

There will be some 750 names on the primary ballots. 

Representative Raker wants to put a government fence 

around our volcano. 

Tulare has a superfluous leper, and offers him to San 

Francisco. No thank you. 

The Sacramento Superior Court the other day dismissed 

a suit that had been on the docket for 48 years. 

What are John Eshleman's politics? He is running as a 

Republican, a Democrat and a Progressive. 

The game of Progressive signatures for candidates' pe- 
titions is not as prosperous as it might be. 

Mr. Bryan is a busy man. He passed up twenty treaties 

to the Senate the other day. That should hold them awhile. 

Roosevelt covets a reputation as a phrase maker, but 

his latest essay, "Government by convulsion," is flat nonsense. 

A sanctimonious political party dealing in fraudulent 

petitions to qualify their candidates might make old Satan grin 
with envy. 

A Sacramento farmer complained to the police that 

thieves had stolen a load of hay from his barn. Lucky they did 
not steal the barn. 

Sacramento authorities having an indigent family on their 

hands, shipped them bodily to San Jose. Has Sacramento a 
grudge against San Jose? 

"The drafting of the Ten Commandments and the cli- 
mate of California are about all for which the Progressives do 
not claim credit," says John D. Fredericks. 

Fraudulent Progressive petitions in San Francisco and 

fraudulent Progressive registrations in Alameda County supply 
the most convincing commentary on the pretentions of that 
party. 

A Fresno anonymous letter writer was run down by the 

local sleuths. As his letters were chiefly directed to the county 
officials advising them how to run their business, they promptly 
concluded that the man should be examined for insanity. 



The village of Arbuckle, somewhere on the map of the 

Sacramento Valley, has invented a slogan of which it is justly 
proud, and insists on having it copyrighted. The man who 
would filch Arbuckle's slogan would steal candy from a baby. 

Under the heading of "A Whisker Finish Promised in 

Pacific Coast League," one of the leading experts tells us: "H. 
Wallace Bray Hogan and his troop of wild Tigers pranced 
away with the lead in the Pacific Coast league yesterday, when 
they handed the lowly commuters from 'My City Oakland' a 
drubbing while the Silly Seals were partaking of the long end 
of the score in their fracas with Walt McCredie's Beavers." 

California is paying salaries to 37 different varieties 

of Commissions, and every blessed commissioner of the lot 
takes his orders from Hiram Johnson. In the Governor's apol- 
ogy for refusing Ruef 's parole he wrote : "Insofar as I have 
expressed my views to certain members of the prison directors 
and their views accord with mine, I accept the responsibility." 
Now if Johnson does all the work he should be paid all the 
salaries, and people would understand that this is an au- 
tocracy. 

George Wingfield, Nevada mining man and stockman, 

millionaire, who refused to accept the appointment to the United 
States Senate two years ago when that position was offered him 
by Governor Oddie, following the death of Senator Nixon, an- 
nounces his candidacy on the Republican ticket for the office of 
State Senator from Washoe County. Wingfield will campaign 
the county on the platform of keeping carpet-baggers away 
from the legislature, and also will advocate the enactment of 
a law permitting Paris Mutuals on horse racing. 

A petition asking President Wilson to pardon a typical 

"village blacksmith" is being prepared by the citizens of Gold 
Hill, Ore. John M. Hays, sentenced to six months in the Ala- 
meda county jail, is the object of the petition. Hays, after 
securing employment in the Presidio, purloined 600 pounds of 
zinc belonging to the government. He pleaded guilty and was 
sentenced to six months in jail by Judge Dooling. Hay's repu- 
tation as the honest blacksmith in his home town may result 
in his release. 

"Old Subscriber" in a high fit of indignation writes to 

the Oakland Tribune to ask "Can you tell me why our public 
offices exist? The writer was under the impression that they 
existed to serve the public. The public has, in hundreds of 
complaints, notified our public offices that crowing roosters, 
multiplying as the population grows, are becoming a public 
pest. Hundreds of citizens have sought relief through the de- 
partment of police, the board of health, the department of pub- 
lic health and safety, the city council, to be met with the parrot- 
like banal answer, 'You can's stop a rooster from crowing.' " The 
intelligent one proceeds to draw a picture of a fair city ruined 
by the obstreperous midnight rooster. Why not get the Cham- 
ber of Commerce to put a muffler on the rebellious bird? 



Certain locally ambitious politicians 
An Alameda of Alameda County, and more par- 

County Bogie. ticularly Oakland, would like to per- 

suade their neighbors that San Fran- 
cisco cherishes dark designs to make a bodily and forcible 
seizure of the "white meat" of their county, and municipally 
pocket the spoil. Just how or by what means this capture by 
force and arms could be effected without the full and legal con- 
sent of the people of Alameda County these ingenious politi- 
cians do not explain. They do not explain because, of course, 
they cannot. Their bogie man is stuffed with sawdust. 

All this should be obvious enough to anybody who will take 
the trouble to reflect for five minutes on the facts of the situa- 
iion, but tht San Francisco Chamber of Commerce has never- 
theless taken pains to explain the situation so that the people 
of Alameda may not be fooled by the selfish clamor of the poli- 
ticians. In a communication sent to every commercial organi- 
;ation in Alameda County, the Chamber says : 

"It has been stated, in connection with the consolidation pe- 
tition, that the measure advanced by Los Angeles would per- 
mit San Francisco to annex parts of different counties without 
securing the consent of the county. 

"For your information we will state that the terms of the 
consolidation petition specifically provide that no part of a 
county may be annexed without the majority consent of the 
whole county, together with the majority vote of the county 
initiating the measure. 

"No community can be divided or added without a majority 
vote of all sections affected. There is no specific consolidation 
urged at the present time: it is simply a matter of obtaining 
sufficient signatures to put the enabling act on the ballot, allow- 
ing cities of 75,000 population or over to form consolidated 
city and county governments such as San Francisco now has." 
This explanation should quiet the fears, if there are any such, 
of the people of Alameda County. They need not sit up nights 
in dread that if they go to sleep they will be seized and carried 
away into municipal bondage to San Francisco. This thing 
cannot be done without their full consent. The trouble with 
the politicians is that they don't want to give their fellow citi- 
zens an opportunity to vote on this question, and hence their 
obstructive tactics. As for San Francisco, this city can afford 
to be quite indifferent on the matter. Taxes are considerably 
higher in Oakland than they are here. Altogether it is not sur- 
prising that the local politicians over there want to keep the 
good thing they have. 

»• 
The Exposition management has 
Fire Fighters in Action, planned a remarkable exhibition of 
fire fighting apparatus in action at 
the world's fair grounds to take place on the 18th of this month. 
There will be fire drills, ladder climbing and leaping into life- 
nets. A fire alarm will be turned in by Fire Chief Murphy, 
which will be responded to by all the companies on the grounds, 
and at the same time the high pressure system will be turned 
on both from the surface hydrants and from the monitors or 
swivel nozzles, mounted on the parapets of the main buildings. 
One of the fire tugs will make a demonstration along the water 
front. 

To take part in or witness this event, professional fire fight- 
ers from all over the Pacific Coast will assemble in this city. 
The fire protection of the Exposition, when fully installed, is 
said to be the most remarkable and efficient of its kind in 
America. It will be more than double that of any former Ex- 



position. There are three fire stations on the grounds already 
completed. Station No. 1 has the following equipment: One 
combination pumping engine and hose wagon, squad wagon 
with chemical tank, two hose wagons with turret nozzles and 
service truck, with thirty-five men on duty from the San Fran- 
cisco fire department. Station No. 2 has one combination pump- 
ing and hose wagon, one hose wagon with turret nozzle, and 
eighteen men. The two stations have between them 500 feet of 
3 inch hose, 5,000 feet of 2% inch hose, 1,000 feet of iy 2 inch 
hose. Seven engine companies, one ladder truck, one chemical 
engine and one monitor battery, and a total of ninety-two men 
of the San Francisco Fire Department are located within one 
and one-half miles of the Exposition. The high pressure water 
mains and hydrants are all laid and in service, except the loop 
through the stock exhibit, and the system is supplied through 
a four inch by-pass and a twelve inch gate at Chestnut street. 
A pressure of 300 pounds can be obtained by drawing from the 
Twin Peaks Reservoir. 

The automatic sprinkler equipment has already been com- 
pleted in the Manufacturers, Liberal Arts, Agriculture, Educa- 
tion and Food Products Buildings. All piping is being tested up 
to 450 pounds. Sprinkler equipment is standard as to pipe 
sizes and sprinkler spacing, but the space beneath the floor of 
each of these buildings will not be sprinklered, nor will the main 
central dome of each building. Equipment is to be wet pipe 
without alarm valves; each riser supplied by the 6-inch high 
pressure loop under the floor, with control valve on floor base 
of riser. Machinery and Fine Arts Buildings will not be sprin- 
klered nor will the State or Foreign Buildings or amusement 
concessions. 

All roof turret nozzles are in service, also all inside hydrants 
on floors of main buildings with high pressure roof hydrants, 
each of the latter equipped with one hundred and fifty feet of 
2V2 inch hose with Underwriters' play pipe. The service water 
hose outlets on floors of main buildings are equipped with IV2 
inch unlined linen hose. Open sprinklers have been installed, 
and are in service, with the exception of those on the uncom- 
pleted tower and courts. All of the main exhibit buildings are 
being equipped with hollow wire automatic fire alarm systems 
throughout, including domes and spaces beneath floors. 270,- 
000 feet of tubing has been installed to date. 

The Exposition has distributed forty-seven 33 gallon chemi- 
cal carts about the grounds at advantageous points, both inside 
and outside of buildings. There are numerous 2 J /2 gallon 
chemical extinguishers in the different buildings under con- 
struction. The Exposition has distributed ninety-six 2V 2 gal- 
lon chemical extinguishers in Machinery Building, fifty-one in 
Ihe Education Building, and twenty-four in the Service Building, 
also a 50 gallon chemical engine in the latter building. All fire 
extinguishers are charged and ready for service. The program 
for August 28th will far exceed anything attempted so far in the 
way of demonstrating the efficiency of modern fire fighting ap- 
paratus. 

■SB- 
The student self-government fad no longer commends it- 
self to Principal Rossiter, of the Fremont high school in Oak- 
land. Rossiter was once favorable to student self-government. 
His experiment of a "Student Self-Govemment day," at which 
older students acted as teachers and pupils were placed on 
honor to behave, was hailed with joy. But there was a piano 
in the school. Naturally, a dance followed, with tango trim- 
mings, and now the principal proclaims that a school should be 
a monarchy. 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



A California Canal. 



The by-pass canal by which it is in- 
tended to take care of a considerable 
part of flood waters that in wet sea- 
sons inundate Yolo County, has been in process of construction 
for some time and is making steady progress. It is expected 
that by the end of the year the Knights' Landing ridge will be 
cut through. Three dredgers are at work on the project, which 
is being carried out by Reclamation district number 108. Some 
idea of the scope of this undertaking may be gathered from the 
fact that the cut is to be 7 miles long and 400 feet wide on the 
bottom. At the top it will be almost twice this width. The 
deepest cut to be made is 16 feet. The canal will have a S-foot 
fall in the 7 miles. The estimated cost of the work is $800,000 
which is to be raised by assessment on 73,000 acres of land in 
District 108 and other lands where heretofore have been sub- 
ject to reclamation assessment. All the valuable lands to the 
west of District 108 levee, which during wet years have been 
absolutely useless, will be doubled in value, yet no assessment 
will be paid on this land. 

It is learned from the Grimes Record that a new feature has 
entered into this great work which will render the cut of far 
more value and interest. When the Southern Pacific was figur- 
ing on the work they would have to do on their Knights Land- 
ing branch, on account of the cut, the idea of utilizing the canal 
for transportation purposes was suggested and since then the 
company has looked upon the proposition with great favor. The 
district is figuring on combining with the railroad company on 
making the canal navigable for river boats. During the winter 
there will be sufficient water in the canal to float the boats and 
in the summer it will be kept full by means of two locks. Dis- 
trict 108 has agreed to put up half the expense of building the 
locks. 

3B- 
In their determination to force a 
To Reach City Voters, universal eight hour law upon Cali- 
fornia, proponents of the measure 
have circulated industriously the statement that a vast majority 
of workers on farms exist as slaves, drudging unnumbered 
hours under the most trying conditions. But the report of the 
California State Labor Bureau disproves this statement and 
shows clearly that conditions of labor in California are more 
nearly ideal than anywhere in the civilized world. The bureau 
investigate the hours of labor of 135,154 male wage workers 
and found their average employment to be as follows: 1,675 or 
1.5 per cent worked 12 hours, 950 or 0.9 per cent worked 11 
hours, 18,115 or 16.8 per cent worked 10 hours, 46,627 or 43.2 
per cent worked 9 hrs., 39,532 or 36.6 per cent worked 8 hours, 
1,051 or 1.0 per cent worked less than 8 hours. 

"That report should effectually disprove the absurb state- 
ments made by proponents of the Universal Eight Hour Law 
that California labor is overworked," said Arthur Dunn, secre- 
tary and manager of the Farmers' Protective League at Sacra- 
mento. "If California workingmen were being mistreated the 
fact would not be overlooked in official reports." 

Secretary Dunn announced that organizations had been ef- 
fected in twenty counties to defeat the Universal Eight Hour 
Law and the local organizations have aggregate membership of 
many thousands. In the country districts the educational cam- 
paign is well under way. 

"It is necessary to arrange for the commencement of the cam- 
paign in the large centers," said Dunn. "We find that the to:;! 
registration in three counties — Los Angeles, San Francisco and 
Alameda — is within 2,500 votes of a clear majority of the en- 
tire vote in the State. It is the city dweller we must convince 
— and hence our efforts will be centered around the more popu- 
lous districts." 



The extravagant indifference with 
Wasteful Municipal which the present municipal admin- 
Administration. istration of San Francisco imposes 

needless burdens on the property 
owners of this city is a crying scandal. Taxes have hitherto 
been comparatively moderate in San Francisco, but by reason 
of heavy commitments for unnecessary purposes, they are be- 
ginning to hurt. If to these regular taxes are added special as- 
sessments and requirements for work not needed, the result 
must be to discourage investment in a city run by the tax eaters. 
For example, there is the enormously costly and quite un- 
necessary tunnel under Twin Peaks — an undertaking that has 
put a heavy mortgage on a considerable section of the city. 
Nine out of ten property owners in the assessed district will 
reap no benefit or advantage from the tunnel. Certain real 
estate schemes will be given a profitable boost for which their 
fellow citizens must pay. 

A somewhat similar instance of wasteful indifference to the 
imposition of unnecessary burdens on property owners is found 
in the municipal order directing the Santa Fe Railroad to build 
a bridge across Islais Creek at a point where there is not now 
and will not for years to come be any traffic. This order im- 
posing a serious financial burden is made to promote the inter- 
ests of one large property owner south of the creek. Like the 
Twin Peaks project, this is another instance of robbing Peter 
to pay Paul. Burdens are recklessly imposed on one set of 
property owners to promote the interests of another set. It is 
all part of the regime of municipal extravagance complicated 
by graft for the profit of special interests. 

W 

Simon Lubin, of Sacramento, who 
Immigration Via has studied the subject of immigra- 

The Panama Canal. tion, does not look for any material 
increase in the flow of population to 
California due to the opening of the Panama Canal. In a recent 
interview he is quoted : 

"During the past few years, about 30,000 immigrants arriv- 
ing each year at the various ports of the United States have 
given California as their destination. I see no reason why this 
annual influx should fall off. This number does not include 
those foreigners who first settled in some other State, and then 
re-migrated to California; of these there is no count taken 
whatsoever. Will the Panama Canal bring a large direct im- 
migration? Doubtless you have observed scores of rumors that 
have appeared from time to time in the newspapers, to the ef- 
fect that untold thousands are purchasing steamship tickets 
to be used for passage through the Panama Canal. Estimates 
have been given as to the number now paying for their tickets 
in small weekly installments; 140,000 in Spain alone, 150,000 
to 300,000 from Italy, and correspondingly large numbers from 
other parts of Eastern and Southern Europe. 

"The Federal government has been making inquiries along 
these lines. In a recent letter, Commissioner-General of Im- 
migration Caminetti writes : 'Twenty-six reports from the State 
Department indicate that foreign steamship companies have so 
far taken no action to stimulate immigration via the canal.' " 

Mr. Lubin's reasoning does not appear convincing. The fact 
that the steamship companies have not begun canvassing for 
this trade in advance is by no means conclusive. Against that 
ifact, if it be a fact, we may set the other fact that most of the 
important sea carrying companies have already announced their 
intention to install a regular steamship service between Europe 
and the Pacific Coast via the Canal. In self protection these 
liners will be compelled to drum up passenger business on an 
extensive scale. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

The Turkey Trot Intrudes— A Parisian Danseuse Incommunicado in Berkeley — The Old 

Fogies and the Young Fogies of a University Town — A Strictly Moral Circus at a Learned 

Picnic — An Accomplish' d Press Agent— Some Pulpit Thunder — The Dean's Apology 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



No university curriculum and no theatrical performance of 
contemporary life is complete without an interlude of dancing, 
grave or gay, grotesque or graceful. The observation is sug- 
gested by a serious minded debate conducted with the help of 
the Oakland Tribune as chorus gentleman in the Greek sense, to 
settle the important question whether an amateur performance 
of the "Mikado," given by the young ladies of the Oakland 
High School graduation class should be permitted to include 
as part of the opera the fashionable dances of the period, such 
as the tango the maxixe, the hesitation waltz and other hilar- 
ious steps. The faculty frowned at the idea, but the stage 
manager winked, and when asked what he meant to do, said : 
'To please every one, I think that we ought to introduce some 
if the latest dances into the opera. The faculty should recon- 
cile themselves to these dances, because they have come to 
stay. The opera itself is so full of life and humor that it really 
does not need any addition, but I believe in pleasing every one." 
5 5 5 

A Model Stage Manager. 

Here to be sure is what the author of the "Mikado" might 
have described as the very model of a modern stage manager. 
He is right up to date, and has no use for any grouchy old 
schoolmaster who stands in the way of progress. It may be 
true that the tango was not danced in old Japan, but this, in 
the mind of a model stage manager is a silly objection. We 
may naturally expect in this era of progress to see the witches 
in "Macbeth" doing a turkey trot. 

So it is with the University of California as with the Oakland 
high school. They are right up to date, and they have intro- 
duced a Parisian young lady of many airs and graces to steer 
the blundering steps that tread the summer groves of academe. 
There was in the beginning some mystery about the rites con- 
ducted by Madame La Gai, and one learns from the same 
veracious authority that Professor C. H. Rieber, dean of the 
summer session, appeared in a delightful and new role of 
protecting women. For be it known Professor Rieber has un- 
dertaken to guarantee peace and quietude to Mme. La Gai, the 
dainty French danseuse, who has come to teach at the summer 
session. Callers at the Hotel Shattuck who asked to see the 
Madame received from the hotel clerk the question in return : 
"Have you permission from Dean Rieber?" A negative reply 
was met with the ultimatum that no one would be permitted to 
see Mme. La Gai except upon presentation of a written order 
from Dean Rieber. 

5 5 5 

Kept Incommunicado. 

It may be that the young lady was kept incommunicado by 
a jealous dean — no imputation is cast on the dean's virtue — be- 
cause of the extensive and perhaps embarrassing publicity 
given to Madame La Gai by the Eastern press on her way 
across the continent. Indeed, in the course of one interview 
she had given out a letter written to her by Dean Rieber, in 
which he said: 

"Our university community is somewhat conservative, and 
for several years I have been criticised for introducing dancing 
into the summer session program, but I am sure with your as- 
sistance you will put the art into its proper place on the uni- 
versity program." 



Old and Young Fogies. 

Before the lady's arrival, the dean was confidant that she 
could set right the old fogies and the young fogies of Berkeley, 
who were too "conservative" to see any legitimate relationship 
between a learned picnic in the good old summer time and the 
light fantastic toe. In fact, the Reverend David A. Pitt, of 
the First Baptist Church of Berkeley, had expressed his db 
approval of Madame La Gai's program, which may explain the 
dean's hesitation waltz. But here a vile suspicion intrudes. A 
smart press agent would understand that he could get the tullest 
measure of publicity by keeping a beautiful dancing damsel, hot 
off the Paris griddle, in mysterious seclusion. At least we may 
conclude that the summer picnic at the university needs neither 
?. stage manager nor a press agent. 

5 5 5 
An Accomplished Press Agent. 

In fact, this policy of exclusiveness was widely exploited in 
the press, and when it was extended to the exclusion of men 
from the dancing classes, the awful wrath of the associated 
dancing masters rose like a thunder cloud, threatening the uni- 
versity. Professor Daniel, who, notwithstanding the "conser- 
vative" quality of the town teaches dancing in Berkeley, took 
up the matter with the now thoroughly pestered dean, and when 
he was refused admission to the class, he made these few but 
well chosen remarks : 

"If they are teaching dancing as an art, why should they ex- 
empt men? One of the aims of the dancing department of the 
university is to fit its pupils to teach dancing, and surely men 
should be allowed to give such instruction as well as woman. 
While I have been fitting young women for the last twenty 
years, I am anxious to learn Mile. La Gais methods and her 
dances. I believe that the Pacific Association of Dancing Mas- 
ters, of which I am a member, will back me in an effort to have 
men admitted to these classes as pupils." 

5 5 5 
The Embattled Dancing Masters. 

His constitutional rights as a dancing master had been vio- 
lated by a lawless dean, afraid of his old fogies. It was cruel 
enough to give "Veritas" and "Old Subscriber" the willies. 
The dean's seclusion rule was later relaxed, and in fact was 




BOORD'S 

LONDON. ENG., GINS 



DRY 

OLD TOM 

TWILIGHT 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 

MMTi Pacific Com 314 SACRAMENTO ST,, S. F. 






August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 






explained to be a mistake made by somebody lot otherwise 
identified. The dean's skirts are clear, and he takes rank as 
a highly successful and ingenious impresario. When the news- 
paper people got access to Madame La Gai, this was the result : 
"My art is the thing," she said, "and not myself. So I shall 
allow no more of the pictures of myself to be given out. For 
myself, I am nothing. But my message of beauty to the people ; 
that is everything. The dance is a fine, living thing; it is more : 
it is divine. It not only bestows grace upon its devotee, when 
it is properly done, but the posture and rhythm make for the 
perfect body. In New York I danced for the people; and I 
know the lesson was of great value to them. Those were dances 
that expressed the soul and the beautiful mind. The gospel of 
grace, it is that I have come to teach, and I want it should make 
your women to be beautiful and strong." 
V o" 5 

The Patter of Art. 

Oh, the lovely patter of art for art's sake, and the gospel oi 
the talking legs that should confound Dean Rieber's conserva- 
tive old fogies of Berkeley. But the exclusion order applying 
to the men remained in force, and the heavenly wrath of Dan- 
iel was not to be appeased. The professor made several efforts 
to secure admission to the classes, but without avail. Each 
time it has been explained to him with much firmness that his 
sex is an obstacle and the summer session ruling is against his 
sex. Now he falls back upon the belief that the costumes of 
the women in the dancing classes are not presentable. Just 
what these are is thus stated in the announcement of Mile. La 
Gai's courses: 

"Bloomers, short gathered above the knee, with very little 
fullness. Skirt, accordeon pleated or fulled, length ending just 
above knee. Color, dark blue or black." 

"They must be ashamed of themselves, and so won't let men 
see them," said Professor Daniel, and continued: "It is dis- 
crimination and a 'combination in restraint of trade' not to ad- 
mit men to these classes, because women teachers may thus se- 
cure an advantage over us. There is nothing in the nature of 
the real science of dancing — and it is an exact and beautiful 
science — that ought to stand in the way of my participation. 
I wished to go to all the classes," he says. "I see no reason 
why not. I can't harm them, and they will not harm me. Other 
members of the Dancing Masters' Association are permitted to 
take the courses, but as they are women, there is no objection. 
It isn't reasonable." 

5 V V 

The Dean's Apology. 

During the early period while Madame La Gai was held in- 
communicado — by mistake — Dean Rieber gave out this state- 
ment: 

"Mile. La Gai has mapped out what seems to me a very sane 
and national program of teaching. Of course, she will teach the 
Maxixe and the hesitation and some of the neo-modern dances, 
like the mazurka and the polka; but you see she is to use these 
dances only as a means to an end. She will teach her students 
that out of them can be developed some very beautiful dances. 
She and I agreed that these modern dances have many beauti- 
ful and few objectionable features. However, she will not em- 
phasize the d.mces themselves, but only as ar. introduction to 
her more classical work." 

Dean Rieber did not comment upon the dancer's statement 
that she planned an exhibition to which the faculty only is to 
he admitted. Perhaps the professor supposed that was a mat- 
ter which concerned only the dancer and the scientists and 
philosophers who are to watch her evolutions. 

Madame La Gai's intimation that she was to appear before 
the faculty like a perfectly virtuous Susannah before the elders 



seems to have been dropped in the course of a newspaper in- 
terview before the lady met the university press agent. Indeed, 
if any such function was ever held, the reporters must have 
slipped a cog or been excluded. 

o S 0" 
Some Pulpit Thunder. 

Then the Rev. David A. Pitt, of the First Baptist Church, 
presumably an old fogy, unlimbered his pulpit thunder like 
this : "I am thoroughly convinced that we have enough of these 
modern dances already. It doesn't seem to be necessary to 
import a teacher from Paris to show us any more about them. 
In fact, I think we know all we ought to know about them now. 
Nor does it seem to be that the university is the proper place 
for such instruction anyway. We look to the university for 
better things. I certainly think that such instruction as this 
ought to be barred." 

But how may this fulmination consist with the announcement 
in the advance notices of the university summer school, which 
gave out the information that Madame La Gai was to teach only 
the sort of dancing that is "aesthetic, cultural, hygienic, moral 
and social." All these are words of peculiar sanctity. 



COLD BLOODED MURDER. 
Acquittal of Madame Caillaux a Disgrace to the French Courts. 

The verdict acquitting Madame Caillaux is a disgrace to the 
French courts. It is an example of justice defeated by a tem- 
porary emotional insanity that obscured the fact that this was 
a cold blooded murder deliberately undertaken. In fact, 
Madame Caillaux herself admitted these facts in her prelimi- 
nary examination. Her testimory before the examining mag- 
istrate regarding the purchase of the revolver with which she 
killed Gaston Calmette was confirmed at the trial by M. Fro- 
mantin. an employee of the gunsmith from whom she bought 
the revolver. The prosecution sought to show that Mme. Cail- 
laux wanted to perfect her aim before going to the office of the 
Figaro. Fromentin took the revolver in question from the 
table of exhibits and explained its action. Another of the 
gunsmith's employees testified that Mme. Caillaux practiced in 
the range under the store, and two of her six shots struck a 
target the size of a human figure. To this the prisoner re- 
plied : "I tried the pistol only at the request of the employee, 
as he wanted me to be sure I knew how it worked. I had 
never fired a pistol, but I had hunted with my husband." 

A vivid picture of the cold blooded murder was drawn by 
Maitre Chenu, who, in his address to the court, said: "I will 
ask the accused whether, when she spoke of her love for her 
daughter, she thought of the two children of M. Calmette, 
whose pictures never left him. I shall not attempt to go into 
the biography of Mme. Caillaux. She is a cool, sensible wo- 
man, without emotion or pity. She has tears only for herself. 
She worked with tenacity to break up her lover's home. You 
see the result — the mistress triumphed over the lawful spouse. 
They are bound up in each other, in their hopes, even in their 
murder plans." 



The Chamber of Commerce of La Jolla, San Diego 

County, is a highly moral body penetrated with the deepest 
respect for Mrs. Grundy, and so it has called on the police to 
stop the La Jolla habit of going shopping or paying party calls 
in a bathing costume. So if the police respond to the Chamber 
of Commerce plea, the streets of La Jolla soon may see the 
strange sight of a burly policeman, with a pair of pants in his 
hand, shouting "Put these on!" as he chases a trouserless shop- 
per through the back dpor of a picture show. 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 




Louis Montgomery, who is a candidate for State Senator 

from one of the Santa Clara County districts, runs as a straight 
Republican, and asks no other nomination, and he puts some 
pertinent questions to his opponent, who is one of "the strad- 
dlers" seeking all three nominations. This is the case as 
stated by Mr. Montgomery addressing his competitor: "I ob- 
serve from the official records in the County Clerk's office that 
you are a candidate for State Senator. That you are registered 
as a Progressive. That you have filed three petitions asking 
the people to nominate you as a Progressive, a Republican and 
as a Democrat. What I desire to know is, in the event of your 
nomination by either the Republican, Democratic or Progressive 
parties, which State convention will you attend? Under Sec- 
tion 24 of the primary act, the Senator that is elected at the 
primary must attend a State convention and assist in drafting 
the 'party platform of his party, select a State central com- 
mittee, and in presidential years elect presidential electois.' 
Should you be nominated at the coming primary by the Repub- 
licans, is it your intention to assist in promulgating the party 
platform and select a State central committee?" 

District Attorney Hynes of Alameda County appears to 

have got even with the Cloverdale policeman who arrested 
him for exceeding the speed limit. Hynes managed, when the 
case came to trial, to cause the policeman to testify that the 
machine was going at three separate speeds. Hynes then paid 
fine imposed, but on his return called to the attention of the 
Cloverdale authorities the fact that the trial was held on a 
Sunday, that the testimony of the policeman was varied and 
remarkable — and as a result the policeman was dismissed. 

It is announced that a passenger and freight service be- 
tween New York and San Srancisco through the Panama Canal 
will be established early in 1915 by the International Mercan- 
tile Marine Company. The steamships Finland and Kroonland, 
22,000 tons each, American built and flying the American flag, 
now of the Red Star line, will be put on the new Panama-Pacific 
line. Sailings once in three weeks are contemplated, and the 
journey will be made in fifteen days, with a call en route at San 
Diego or Los Angeles. 

The Sacramento Chamber of Commerce is going to pro- 
tect the women. A course of instruction, by means of printed 
matter and diagrams to be posted conspicuously, will be given 
all Sacramento women. They will be shown how to get off 
street cars in the proper and approved manner — even with tight 
skirts — and they will be given timely hints on how to keep from 
getting injured by autos, motorcycles, bicycles and other 
vehicles. A chamber of commerce teaching its grandmother to 
suck eggs would be an edifying sight. 



One rather unexpected consequence of the direct primary 

and the system of nomination therefor by petition, appears in 
Yolo County, where most of the county offices will have no op- 
position, and it is practically certain tkat the following candi- 
dates will step into office as a result of the primary election : 
J. W. Monroe, Sheriff; H. R. Sounders, Clerk; Mrs. T. H. 
Kitto, Coroner; H. Henigan, Recorder; Roy Cole, Treasurer; 
R. P. Wallace, Auditor; A. L. Farish, Public Administrator; W. 
0. Nussell, Supervisor. 



The appellate court has set aside the game law of 1913, 

and if no appeal is taken before August 3d, the State is thrown 
back on the law of 1911. Results are very mixed, and as the 
present law remains in effect for thirty days after the decision, 
this will give two open seasons for deer this year to Humboldt 
and Santa Barbara Counties, and to cut down the season in San 
Joaquin and Inyo Counties. In Humboldt and Santa Barbara 
Counties the deer season began this year on July 1st. When the 
act of 1913 becomes inoperative on August 3d, the season will 
close in these two counties, but under the act of 1911 will be 
open again in Humboldt County from August 15th to November 
1st, and in Santa Barbara County from August 16th to Septem- 
ber 15th. In San Joaquin County the season will be changed 
from September 1th to November 1st, to be open from August 
3d to September 1st. In Alpine and Mono Counties there will 
be no change, but in Inyo the season will be shortened to run 
from August 15th to September 15th. 

Another consequence of the direct primary is to reduce 

the party central committees to comparative insignificance. 
Gustave Brenner, explaining the inactivity of the Republican 
State committee, of which he is chairman, said: "It is difficult 
for many Republicans to realize in what position the primary 
law places the State committee prior to the primary election. 
The primary law makes us a non-partisan body. We are for no 
one Republican candidate as against any other aspirant to of- 
fice on the Republican ticket." Under the old system the party 
committees were all powerful through control of the organiza- 
tion. 

The complex relations of modern business are illustrated 

by the fact that the big fruit shippers of this State are short of 
nails to make boxes because of the Mexican war. The nails 
used in fruit box construction are, in large measure, shipped 
here from the Eastern coast. The Tehuantepec route was 
closed by the fighting in Mexico about the time the fruit season 
began, and all vessels were re-routed by way of the Horn. Then 
two carrying nail cargoes were badly damaged by fire in San 
Francisco Bay, and the nails, on account of their cement cov- 
ering, were a total loss. 

William Fleming, a Berkeley man, hiking the hills near 

Haywards, saw a meadow lark rescued from a hawk by two 
sparrows. Hovering high in the air in search of prey, the hawk 
pounced down on a meadow lark which had just risen out of 
the grass. Before the bigger bird, in its plummet-like descent, 
could reach the lark, two sparrows chattering excitedly flew at 
the hawk, whose attentions they endeavored to distract. The 
little fellows kept the hawk so busy that the lark had time to 
escape. Mr. Fleming does not know why the hawk did not care 
for a meal of sparrow, and so we must ask the hawk. 

When is a candidate not a candidate? Attorney-Gen- 
eral Webb, interpreting the law, has decided that "In the ab- 
sence of direct language to the contrary, I believe a man is not 
a candidate until he has secured a nomination. I conclude that 
the primary election law of 1913 contains the only provisions 
that apply to expenditures that may be made by the one seek- 
ing to obtain a nomination at the primary elections held pur- 
suant to such law." 

A Coronado Beach press agent is excited over "the girl 

with the pink mask," who wears, one gathers, not much beside 
when she dips in the briny. Thus the press agent: "Young, 
daintily charming, with the poise of a queen, the wit of a 
Parisienne, the coquetry of the entrancing rainbow — she has 
set the society folk of Coronado and San Diego into a buzzing 
Babel of whispered comment and speculation. Who is she?" 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PL/DAS URE/'S WAND 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 




PAUL OERSON. 



Orpheum. 

Vaudeville is indeed varied nowadays. Gathered 
into the ranks of the two-a-day can be seen people 
of every nationality. This week at our own popular 
Orpheum the honors are carried off by a Chinaman. 
He is not an acrobat, neither is he a magician. He 
is a singer, and possesses a pure lyrical tenor. His 
vocalizing, that is, the greater part of it, is rend- 
dered in pure English. His ballads are given with 
remarkable expression, and this week, at least, he 
does not wander into the realm of grand opera. To 
satisfy the usual expectations of the average audi- 
ence of to-day, he gives us some rag-time, and in 
order to vary the usual trend of things, he translates 
it into Chinese, and that the thing is funny I have 
no doubt, as I noted a number of his fellow coun- 
trymen enjoying it hugely. The others in the audi- 
ence were also spontaneous and vociferous in their 
applause. Altogether, this mild-eyed Celestial 
scores a big hit. The regular program is opened 
by the Seebacks, a lady and gentleman, who do all 
kinds of difficult things with the punching bags. 
This piece of paraphernalia is ordinarily found in 
gymnasiums, and is an unknown article to a major- 
ity of the fair sex, but Seeback and his partner do 
their best to familiarize everybody with them. The 
usual athlete has his hands full in manipulating one 
of them properly, but Seeback, at the termination of 
his act, is working fourteen of them at the same 
time. It is quite a feat. Seeback styles himself 
the champion bag puncher in the world, and after 
witnessing his work, I am positive that nobody will 
deny him this title. It is a good act. 

The Five Melody Maids this time bring two men 
with them. The act is entertaining and diverting, 
and is refined. Clark and Verdi, the Italian come- 
dians, are paying us another visit. They cannot come 
often enough to suit us. They are genuine come- 
dians. The little fellow is a character artist the 
like of whom we see very rarely these days. His 
depiction of the Italian with a limited knowledge of 
the English language endeavoring to make himself 
understood to a fellow countryman in English is 
screamingly funny. The fight between them I 
should imagine would make a mummy smile. It is 
too funny for words. Chrystal Heme, daughter of 
a talented father, presents herself in an act written 
by her sister Julia. Of the two daughters, Julia is 
possessed of the greater ability. But in all candor, Julia should 
not pose as a playwright. Her act, while it has a certain 
amount of interest, is commonplace and hackneyed. It is the 
familiar story of the district attorney and his client. It affords 
Miss Heme a chance for some good acting, which she tries to 
take advantage of. To an extent she is handicapped by a 
mediocre leading man. In spite of all drawbacks the act ap- 
pears to "get over." and receives liberal applause. Ernette 
Asoria, assisted by Chevalier de Mar and Miss Eliante, are 
seen in a dancing act which begins with a version of the tango 
and ends with the trio doing a mad whirl. It is good dancing 
and is much enjoyed. Trixie Friganza is with us once more, 
— this time vaudeville has lured her, and she is giving her au- 
dience every afternoon and evening thirty minutes of unalloyed 
mirth. We have nobody we can liken Trixie to, with the pos- 
sible exception of Marie Dressier. It is a toss up between them 
which is the funnier. If you want to laugh to your heart's con- 
tent, do not miss Trixie. She and her avoirdupois and her per- 
sonality certainly combine to chase away the blues. Trixie is 
ably assisted by two agile young men. Her version of the 
tango is certainly the limit of the ludicrous. The bill closes 




Vilde Daly, from Hammerstein's London Opera House and 
The Royal Opera Bucharest, who will appear next week at the 
Orpheum. 

with Emil Pallenberg and his three trained bears, an act out 
of the ordinary. There is certainly a diversity of acts this 
week, there being something to please everybody. It is a great 
summer show. 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 



PALACE HOTEL 



DURING 



Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 



CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 



"Merely Mary Ann" at the Alcazar. 

As her farewell to us for this season, "Dainty" Bessie Bar- 
riscale is seen in a role which rounds out a notable list of char- 
acterizations which she has presented to us during her brief 
stay. Of the various characters she has assumed, it is difficult 
to choose which one we like her in the best. No matter whe- 
ther she is playing a queen or a slavey, to each role she lends 
her sweet and charming personality. Miss Barriscale has be- 
come a real fixture with Alcazar patrons, and each time she 
come to us she but increases her following, until now her 
friends and admirers are legion. It is a matter of satisfaction, 
too, that Miss Barriscale has broadened in her work. More 
confidence has brought better results, until now at times there 
is something almost inspirational in her acting. Right now Miss 
Barriscale has as much right by dint of sheer ability to be a 
star as three-quarters of the women on our American stage 
whom the Frohmans and Shuberts and other Eastern managers 
exploit through the country as two dollar stars. Well, Miss 
Barriscale, one might say, is yet at the very beginning of her 
career. During these past years she has been serving her ap- 
prenticeship, ; nd now she is "armed and well prepared" to 
battle for histrionic honors with the best of them. In "Merely 
Mary Ann" Miss Barriscale is delightful, emphasizing the 
splendid impression she has created during her season of a 
few weeks among us. She lends the character a certain dis- 
tinctiveness which makes the role stand out. 

Right well do the other in the organization support her. Due 
honor and credit should this week be accorded to Howard 
Hickman, who surprises everybody with his splendid interpre- 
tation of Lancelot. There is seemingly no end to the striking 
versatility of this fine actor, and his role this week is but 
further evidence that Hickman is about as clever an actor as 
the Alcazar has had in its personnel for some time. Kernan 
Cripps, and Bert Wesner, and Edmond Lowe and Dorcas Mat- 
thews, and others, all contribute their individual ability to a 
performance which is most satisfactory. Zangwill is such a 
good dramatist. Too bad he does not take himself more seri- 
ously as a writer of plays. He wields a pen which can write 
the very cleverest things, and as a satirist he ranks with the 
best of them. His "Merely Mary Ann" gives but a hint of 
what he can do as a playwright. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Orpheum. — Vinie Daly 
from Hammerstein's Lon- 
don Opera House and the 
Royal Opera Bucharest, 
will be heard in songs from 
the operas she has tri- 
umphed in. 

No better combination of 
musicians has been heard 
in vaudeville than the 
Wharry Lewis Quintette. 

Edmond Hayes will pre- 
sent his satire, "The Piano 
Movers," in which one 
laugh follows another. 

Ward, Bell & Ward, a 
trio of dancing gymnasts, 
whose muscular equipment, 
reliable nerves and agility 
enable them to achieve 
really remarkable feats in 
solo and ensemble work, 
call their act "Under the 
White Top." 

Rellow, the mentaphone 
artist, will also be included 
in next week's attractions. 
A mentaphonist is a man 
who makes music with his 
mouth and hands. 

# * £ 

Alcazar. — With a rip- 
roaring "whoopla," popular 
Temple scene from "Cabiria," Charles Ruggles and clever 
which is making a tremendous little Adele Rowland will 
success at the Gaiety Theatre. breeze into the Alcazar 




Theatre on next Monday night, August 3d, in a glittering, glo- 
rious production of the greatest American musical comedy ever 
written, "A Modern Eve," which comes with the stamp of a 
New York, Boston and Chicago triumph. Ruggles needs no 
introduction to local theatre-goers. His comedy gifts are of the 
rarest, and he is a dancer of uncommon grace and agility. 
Adele Rowland, dainty, skillful, bubbling over with an irre- 
sistible personality that matches her fairy-like beauty, and pos- 
sessing to a marked degree that intangible something that is 
best known as temperament, is a jugful of joy in herself. Add 
to these two names the special engagement of Louise Orth and 
Ann Tasker. Then from the Alcazar regular force will be 
many of the old favorites. An augmented orchestra has been 
engaged, and nothing left undone to make this the biggest 

summer musical show ever seen in San Francisco. 
* * » 

Gaiety. — The end of the season for "Cabiria" at the Gaiety 
approaches. It is announced by the Gaiety Theatre manage- 
ment that ensuing bookings of the great D'Annunzio photo- 
spectacle will forbid a much longer stay at the local playhouse, 
where "Cabiria" is about to enter on its fourth and final week. 

This is likely to prove disquieting news to many who have 
heard of the marvels of the D'Annunzio masterpiece, but who 
have neglected to see it thus far, and the advance demand for 
seats indicates that the fourth will be the largest week of all. 

There isn't anything like "Cabiria" from any angle of spec- 
tacle photography, symphonic setting, choral music or sheer 
splendor, and D'Annunzio is likely to live in fame more for his 
scenario to "Cabiria" than for even the finest poem that he has 
ever written, for "Cabiria" is poesy visualized and set to music. 

I THIRD SYMPHONY CONCERT I 

i PEOPLE'S PHILHARMONIC CONCERT f 

l| HERMAN PERLET, Conductor 

1 Pavilion Rink - Sutter & Pierce Sts. 

Thursday evening, Aug. 6th at 8:15 

S General Admission 25c Reserved Seats 50c 

Association Membership Tickets S2. 00 
TICKETS FOR SALE AT 

g Sherman, Clay & Co.-Kohler & Chase -816 St. Francis Hotel 8 

Gaiety Theatre '™~r h,um 

FOURTH. FINAL AND BIGGEST WEEK of 
Gabriele D'Annunzio's Photo-Speciaii.* 

"CABIRIA" 

The Italian Poet'a Masterwork 
MUST BE SEEN TO BE BELIEVED 

Critics exhaust their superlatives to describe the wonders of its visualized 
and musical beauty 

Prices: Evenings, 26c, 50c, 76c. Good Orchestra Seat Wc Matinees, 25c. BQc, 
Patrons are Urged to be Seated at Rise uf Curtain. 



Orpheum 



O'Farrell Street 



Bel. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 



WEEK BEGINNING THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON MATINEE EVERY DAY 

PERFECT VAUDEVILLE 
VINIE DALY From Hammerstein's London Opera House and tin- Royal 
Opera Bucharest in Songs From Operas She Has Hung; THE WHARRY 
LEWIS tjl'INTETTE with E Arnold Johnson, Pianist in Popular Vocal and 
Instrumental Selections: EDMOND HAVES «v CO. in "The Piano Mi 
WARD, HELL & WARD. "Under Thfl White Top;*' M. KELLtiW. Cl 
The Mentaphone Novelty; PRINCE LAI MON KIM The Noted Chinese 
Tenor; EMIL PALLENBERG with His Three Train."' Bears: Last Week 
CHRYSTAL HERNE In Julie Herne's Dramatic Playlet "Dora." 
Evening Prices, 10c 25c, 50c, 75c Box seats, $1. Matinee prli i a 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c. 25c, 60c Phone Douglas 70, 

O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Phone Keornj 2 

Commencing Monday Night. August 8rd, Matinees Thursday. Saturdny 
Sunday — LOOK WHO'S HERE! 

CHARLES RUGGLES-ADELE ROWLAND 
In The Great Big Musical Triumph 

"A MODERN EVE 1 ' 
A Gorgeous. Glittering Production ! A Stunning Chorus Of Ravishing Show 
Girls ! This Is A Red Hot Summer Show ! Popular Summer Prices ' 
Summer Prices — Nights, 25c. 50c, 75c Mats., -"".-.. SBc, 50c 
A good orchestra seat at night for 50c 



Alcazar Theatre 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



PEOPLE'S PHILHARMONIC CONCERT. 

People's Philharmonic Concert. — The third symphony con- 
cert of the People's Philharmonic Orchestra will take place 
next Thursday evening at the Pavilion. The program will be 
as follows: Overture, "Magic Flute," W. A. Mozart; Minuetto, 
Bolzoni; String Orchestra: Introduction and Rondo Capric- 
cioso, C. Saint-Saens, Mr. Franz Adelman. Intermission. Sym- 
phony, "Jupiter," W. A. Mozart, First and Second Movements, 
I. Allegro Vivace; II. Andante Cantabile. Valse, Op. 34, Mosz- 
kowski. Lorelei Trio. "Peer Gynt" Suite, Edward Grieg, (a) 
"Morning," (b) "Aasa's Death," (c) "Anitra's Dance." (d) "In 
the Hall of the Mountain King." 



RISE AND FALL OF MADERO. 

Peter MacQueen writes, in the National Magazine: Fran- 
cisco I. Madero, a young aristocrat, a millionaire, a vegetarian, 
an idealist, a spiritualist, a dreamer of dreams, appears to 
have been the cleanest man in Mexican history. He preached 
for five years to the peons about their wrongs. Into the sodden 
brains of a decrepit and forgotten race came gleams of renais- 
sance. He made them see their glorious forefathers who built 
the temples of Mitla and Yucatan, and swept the proud chivalry 
of Spain into the ditch on the Triste Noche, at the Viga Canal. 
And then he told them of their lands wrested from them by the 
governors of States and territories. The peons could neither 
read nor write; they had no title deeds to their lands. The 
great families, the Creels, the Prietas, the Terrazas, have ab- 
sorbed the patrimony of a thousand years. I myself was shown 
a farm which, I was told on good authority, stretched a hun- 
dred miles in every direction. By the seizure of the lands, mil- 
lions of people were reduced to practical slavery. Madera 
promised to give them back their lands. I think he was sin- 
cere. 



Mr. George W. Coleman, former president of the Asso- 
ciated Ad. Clubs of America, and founder of the Sagamore 
Sociological Conferences, bears the following testimony to the 
unique gifts of Dr. James A. Francis, who will speak in the 
First Baptist Church daily for two weeks commencing August 
2d: "Few men have been so fortunate as to have heard 
Dr. James A. Francis more than I have. Under all circum- 
stances and conditions, it is a positive treat to see him unfold 
any topic which he engages to discuss, and there is something 
so human, direct and dynamic in his own attitude towards 
his subject and his audience that he never fails to inspire. He 
spent his early life in business, and has been a great student 
and reader without having suffered any of the disadvantages of 
the cut and dried curricula of the higher schools. This, to- 
gether with his own native ability, accounts for that unique and 
masterly style of his, which is a combination of the best quali- 
ties of a layman with the skill and resources of a professional 
man. I have heard all the great preachers of this country, and 
would unhesitatingly class James A. Francis among them. 

Yours sincerely, 

George W. Coleman. 



"Hold, Told!" cried the star. "Billboards in our meadow 

scene! That's carrying commercialism a bit too far." "Com- 
mercialism nothing," said the stage manager. "I'm a realist, I 
am, and I want that meadow to look like a genuine one." — 
Tid-Bits. 



Geraldine — I will marry you on one condition. Gerald 

— And what is that? Geraldine — That our marriage shall not 
be allowed to interrupt our friendship. — Judge. 



This is an exceptionally fine season for Yosemite. There 

is now plenty of room in the camps, and also an abundance 
of private camping equipment. The new auto stages carry the 
visitor between the railroad and Yosemite this season, one of 
the finest auto trips in the world, without extra cost. Reduced 
rates are offered during August, 1 and 1-3 fare round trip to 
the valley. This low rate should be taken advantage of. Full 
information about trip, see your home ticket agent, or address 
Yosemite Valley Railroad Company, G. F. Miller, General 
Agent, 212 W. 7th and 334 So. Spring. Los Angeles. O. W. Leh- 
mer, General Manager, Merced, Cal. 

\ ' T>l«rmpnt) 




WOMEN. 

There's pretty girls in every port 

That fronts upon the foam, 
For I've made love in Labrador, 

In Cairo, and in Rome ; 
I've kissed the girls of London Town, 

And sweet to kiss were they, 
But Burmah girls are just as sweet 

And 'Frisco girls as gay! 

There's always eyes to sparkle bright 

And hearts a-beating warm, 
There's lips the man whos bold may kiss, 

And waists to fill an arm; 
The maids are fair in Argentine 

And dainty in Japan, 
There's girls to love in all the world, 

If you're a proper man. 

And who's the fairest of the fair? 

Well, hang me if I know! 
Sometimes I think she lives in France, 

Sometimes in Callao; 
But take 'em north and take 'em south, 

And take 'em east and west, 
Of all the girls in all the world, 

The last one is the best. 

— Berton Braley. 



THE FORGOTTEN DEAD. 

To the forgotten dead, 
Come, let us drink in silence ere we part, 
To every fervent yet resolved heart 
That brought its tameless passion and its tears, 
Renunciation and laborious years. 
To lay the deep foundations of our race, 
To rear its mighty ramparts overhead 
And light its pinnacles with golden grace. 
To the unhonored dead. 

To the forgotten dead, 
Whose dauntless hands were stretched to grasp the rein 
Of Fate, and hurl into the void again 
Her thunder-hoofed horses, rushing blind 
Earthward along the courses of the wind. 
Among the stars along the wind in vain 
Their souls were scattered and their blood was shed, 
And nothing, nothing of them doth remain. 
To the thrice-perished dead. 



The sixth annual number of Walker's Manual of Cali- 
fornia Securities and Directory of Directors, compiled by H. D. 
Walker, which has just been issued, will be welcomed by those 
interested in California securities. It maintains the high stand- 
ard for accuracy and completeness shown in previous numbers, 
and a study of the comparative earnings and balance sheets of 
the various corporations will prove of great value to all in- 
vestors. 



Englishman — The suffragettes saluted the Prime Min- 
ister this morning. American — Did they fire twenty-one guns? 
Englishman — No ; houses. — Life. 




Manufacturer* 
are writing for patent* pro- 
cored thron«h m*' 1 ft I ! : - "?-pa*e 
irufde hoik. "Succeeeful PatenU;" "Stepping Stoat* " 'containing 

mentions wanted, pr I re*, etc.); and "Patent Promotion 
Bvnd for them. Frw manufiirtiirinti facilities. Pergonal Service* 
I get patent or no fee. Adrift ■ 

RICHARD B. OWEN. 99 Owen Bide.. Wishlntfon. 0. C 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 





CffiTX 



The other afternoon at the St. Francis Hotel at tea time a 
group of Blingumites took possession of one of the cozy little 
circles and ordered favorite drinks. Of course they must have 
mentioned the approaching marriage of Mrs. Norma Preston 
Ames and Harry Scott. Groups of people all over the room 
were teaing and sandwiching up to music, in no wise embar- 
rassed by the combination of tiffin and moonlight sonatas. 
Some one has said that the Germans will absorb the most 
spiritual music and the largest sausages at the same moment 
and with perfect ease. But over there they do not try to talk 
at the same time. The percentages of bites in this country is 
so much smaller that after all it may 
not be greater love of music, but 
the physical handicap of a mouth 
crammed to capacity with food 
which makes it impossible for the 
German to eat and talk and listen 
to music at the same time! 

This is not to be a brief for the 
American habit of combining mu- 
sic and dining and conversation. 
Why argue with the analyst who 
maintains that while the combina- 
tion of music with dining is not 
theoretically impossible, composers 
have not had that in view. They 
have applied their genius to love, 
war, religion, seafaring and tne 
dance, but as yet there is nothing 
that can be called distinctively 
"meal music." This critic, chafing 
under minor oppressions, sends up 
a prayer for simple, unobtrusive 
meal songs, composed to accom- 
pany the business of eating and 
talking. However, his prayer is not 
apt to stimulate the imagination cf 
the composers, so we need not look 
for immediate answer to the re- 
quest. Under the present system, 
while the quiet of the world may be 
disturbed, there is no doubt that the 
gaiety of nations is speeded up 
whenever refreshments are served. 
The other day at the St. Francis 
this was beautifully and clearly il- 
lustrated. By a concerted action, 
the tea tipplers were succeeding ad- 
mirably in making a din that sound- 
ed loud and raucous above the 
beautiful, solemn strains of music. 
The music came to an end, and a 
woman's voice, pitched to that din, 
fairly shouted above the subsiding 
hubbub of voices: "Petticoats! Of 
course not : what would any woman 
do with a petticoat these days?" 

Nobody attempted to answer her ; 
in fact, it was difficult to decide to 
which of the many lady guests in 
the room the voice belonged. Some- 
how, the majority of those present 
seemed to think that it belonged to 
the Blingum group, and one enter- 
prising woman explained to me that 
doubtless they were talking about 
"Mrs. Ames' trousseau." I give 
this for what it is worth. Person- 
ally, I think that the remark might 
have come from almost any woman 



in the room full of laughing men and women. While I might 
not go so far as Rudyard Kipling and maintain that "the 
Colonel's lady and Julie O'Grady are the same under their 
skin," there is no argument that they are the same over their 
skin these days. 

© © © 

The marriage of Miss Elizabeth Wheeler and Bradway Head 
on Tuesday evening at St. Luke's Church culminated the sort 
of romance that did not follow conventional lines. In the first 
place, the precedent of marrying off daughters in the order of 
their age was not followed. The bride is the third daughter 
in this lovely household of young girls, and while two of her 
sisters have also plighted their troth, "Betsy," which is the 
love-name of her intimates, was allowed to go to the altar 
first, not only because her engagement was the first announced, 
but because it was more convenient for this marriage to be 
solemnized now than for the others. 

The young man, while he is related to luxury through friend- 
ship and family connections, has made his own way in the 
world, and has not had the sort of life upholstered with luxu- 





Attention: Housewives! 

The Overland Monthly has arranged to deliver the 
$10.00 NATIONAL VACUUM CLEANERS 

to readers, old and new, at the special price of $3.95, 
when ordered in connection with one year's subscrip- 
tion to the 

OVERLAND MONTHLY 

at the regular subscription price of $1.50 per year. 
Now don't let anybody tell you that they have a better 
cleaner, for that is impossible. The National is a 
guaranteed machine, and does the work thoroughly. 

If our representative misses you, write, telephone or 
call: Overland Monthly, Vacuum Cleaner Department, 
21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California. Phone 
Kearny 3594. 

Terms: $1.00 down and balance on delivery of cleaner. 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



ries which his friends have enjoyed. His father. Colonel C. 
P. Head, brother of the late A. E. Head, died when he was a 
mere infant, and the estate of the father, which was largely 
in Arizona holdings, proved to be practically worthless. His 
mother, who is a very charming and distinguished woman, 
with more than the usual musical gifts, has for many years 
made her home very quietly in Berkeley. During the summer 
she was a frequent guest at Mrs. Hearst's home on the Mc- 
Cloud River, and it was there that the two young people met, 
and this acquaintance was continued when Miss Wheeler en- 
rolled at the University of California about the time that 
"Brad" Head left college to enter into a business career. 

The wedding ceremony was an unusually pretty one, with 
many original touches. The bride's costume showed faint 
touches of dawn pink, which sounds tame enough, but is really 
a very exciting, almost thrilling departure from the traditional 
white. The pink was used under the ivory white satin over- 
dress, but when the train swished around one caught a glimpse 
of the tender color and the use of it caused much comment, 
the only note of criticism coming from those who cannot bear 
to see disturbed a single bridal tradition that has set and 
crystallized through the year. The bridal veil of this original 
maiden had another touch not usually found in a wedding cos- 
tume, a tracery of gold thread outlining a graceful pattern 
through the fine mesh of the veil, which was worn close to the 
head like a Juliet cap and then fell like spray over the gown. 
The three sisters of the bride, the Misses Jean, Olive and Lil- 
lias, gowned in adorable frocks fashioned out of pink, blue 
and yellow respectively, made a fetching group of attendants, 
and every one in the church commented on what a refreshing 
and unusual sight it is these modern days to see a big family 
of young daughters. 

© © © 

The marriage of Mrs. Norma Preston Ames and Harry Scott 
tried its best to be an intimate family affair, but there were 
several friends that had a claim on the affections of the bride 
and groom, and when it came to deciding on the personnel of 
the wedding guests, the Malcolm Whitmans, the Templeton 
Crockers and Miss Virginia Jolliffe were included with the 
members of the immediate families. The ceremony was read 
on Wednesday at four o'clock at the home of the bride's sister, 
Mrs. Willard Drown, and while there was no attempt made to 
embroider the wedding with any of the trappings of a formal 
affair, the house was so filled with flowers that were sent by 
friends, and the bride and groom and their respective families 
were so pleased over the marriage that those who were there 
declare that never has a gayer or happier ceremony been wit- 
nessed. The immediate destination of the bridal couple is a 
secret, but after a few days of honeymooning in the somewhere 
nearby, they will be joined by the Stuart Haldrons and motor 
to Oregon to visit the Frank Prestons who have all the joys 
of ranching de luxe to offer to their prospective guests. 
© © © 

The war clouds hovering over Europe have added unusual 
interest to the farewells arranged in honor of the George T. 
Maryes, who came out here to hold hands with their oldest 
friends before embarking on the rigorous duties and pleasures 
of ambassadorship. The dinner given the other night by the 
Robert Oxnards proved that whatever the peace advocates may 
say about the brutalizing, hopeless influence of war, there is 
no doubt that it is the most successful crusher of bromidic 
dinner conversation. One of the women who was at the dinner 
said: "I was so excited and stimulated by the conversation at 
the dinner that I could not bear to even try to go to sleep — so 
I stayed up all night and read history. I felt that there was 
so much that I did not know that I must not lose another mo- 
ment, and went to work then and there." 

Even at the luncheons which are being given for Mrs. Marye, 
the conversation does not revolve around the subject of whe- 
ther the women are going to wear the new "basques," which 
are really the old-fashioned, tight-sleeved, darted affairs of 
twenty years ago. No one buttered the biscuits with the usual 
small talk which is accredited at luncheons. Instead, the wo- 
men discussed the political situation with an astute knowledge 
of conditions which would greatly surprise the men who only 
see them on dress parade. Mrs. Henry T. Scott was the hostess 
at a very beautifully appointed luncheon at the St. Francis, 
and though war talk lowered over the table, the clouds are so 
remote from our own skies that we have all of the thrills with- 



out the pain that comes fiom being personally involved. To 
be sure, as one of the women pointed out, every clever husband 
will use this affair in Europe as a reason for discouraging his 
wife's pet extravagance, but it is impossible to make the wo- 
men feel that any toll which may be exacted on our money 
market can be compared with the toll on human life which we 
must pay when we get into a scrap of our own. So the attitude 
of society at any rate is that this is welcome ammunition for 
the conversational lockers of midsummer. 



The L. & S. Cement Paint is an ideal fire-proof protection 

for wood, and rust preventative for galvanized iron. By 
way of testimony to its value, it mav be stated that it has 
been used on the exterior of all buildings at the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition. An instructive example of the use of this paint in 
the heart of the San Francisco business quarter may be seen 
in the Stewart Hotel on Geary street, where the entire building, 
including the old part previously painted with lead and oil and 
the new addition of concrete, galvanized iron cornices and iron 
fire escapes, are painted with two coats of L & S Cement Paint, 
giving the whole structure a beautiful uniform coloring and ap- 
pearance. An Oakland instance of the use of the same prepara- 
tion may be seen on the exterior of the Central Bank building 
on 14th street and Broadway. This paint is fireproof, and is so 
recognized by the insurance companies. It requires no prelimi- 
nary preparation of any surface before applying, and can be 
applied with brush or sprayed on. 



If you have not attended any of the dances given at 

Techau Tavern on Wednesday evenings, you have been miss- 
ing one of the most notable features of cafe life in San Fran- 
cisco. These dances are always well attended by a throng of 
dancing enthusiasts, and are conducted in a manner which is 
in accord with that air of refinement and respectability which 
is so characteristic of this cafe. At last Wednesday's dance, 
beautiful and costly articles were presented to three of the lady 
guests. These were purchased by the management from S. & 
G. Gump Co., the well known art dealers. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 
Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



Jl Quiet Hotel of Unusual (Excellence 



Bell 



evue 



Hotel 



Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters ^specially to Luncheons and Banquets 

H. W. WILLS, M»n.ger 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Rates Reasonable 

Under Mungemcfll of Victor Reiter 



14 




0C1AL 



San Francisco News Letter AucuST *■• 1914 - 

- ■ ■-■■;?■■',■>■:*»«&§ 

r J 



•■■■>.■ ■?■:.■:■: ».■•;>.:■.' 




ENGAGEMENTS. 
HAMILTON-CROOKS.— As a surprise to the exclusive sets of the bay 

region comes the nrus of the engagement of Minerva Hamilton and 
George Crooks, of Calgary, Canada. Miss Hamilton has for the last 
year made her home with an uncle in Canada, but previously resided 
In Sausalito. Crooks is engaged in business in Canada, and the 
young couple will live there. The date of the wedding is not yet set, 
but it will take place in August. 
IIAPPERSBERGER-BRGDE. — Last week the engagement of Miss Anita 
Happersberger to Mr. Walter R. Brode was announced to her numer- 
ous friends in this city. Miss Happersberger is the attractive daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Happersberger, and was an accomplished 
■lancer at many of the local cotillions of last winter. Mr. Brode is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Brode. He is a member of the Olympl- 
Club, and the president of the Brode Iron Works. 
DAYNE-BLISS. — The engagement of Miss Marie Payne, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ge >rge L. Payne, to Mr. Dudley Bliss. Jr., is made known 
through cards sent by mail. The Paynes are spending the summer 
in Menlo, and the wedding is provisionally set for some date late 
in the fall, after the family returns to the city. Mr. Bliss is the son 
Of Mr. and Mrs. George D. Bliss. He also is out of town for the 
summer. 
SALSIG-CARTWRIGH.T. — Through the medium of informal notes, friends 
are learning of the engagement of Miss Myrtle Lenore Salsig and 
Morse Adams Cartwright, both graduates from the University of 
California, with the further news that the wedding Is to take place 
August 15th. at St. John's Presbyterian Church. The bride-elect is 
a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar B. Salsig. Cartwright was gradu- 
ated in 1H12, is a Chi Psi fraternity man and was a member of the 
Knglish Department faculty last year. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
P. P. Cartwright of Los Angeles. 
WHITING-TAYLOR.— The engagement of Miss Marie Whiting to En- 
sign .fames Harvey Taylor. U. S. X.. has been announced. Miss 
Whiting was to have made her debut this winter, and now there wilt 
lie a wedding instead of a coming-out ball. During the past few 
years the Whitings have lived in Berkeley. Ensign Taylor is attached 
to the U, S. S. Denver. He is a member of a prominent family of 
Indiana, and came to this coast soon after his graduation from An- 
napolis three years ago. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
BLAND-PREUSSER. — The wedding of Miss Serina Bland, daughter of 
Mrs. Florence Bland, to Charles Preusser of Manila, will be one of 
the most elaborate affairs of the season, and will take place Sep- 
tember 8th in the home of the bride in Belvedere. More than 200 
guests will be present. Miss Bland is the niece of Mrs. Hugo D. 
Keil of Belvedere, and of Charles Miner Goodall. and is granddaughter 
of the late Captain Charles Goodall. Mr. Preusser is one of Manila's 
leading business men. 

WEDDINGS. 
AMES-SCOTT. — The wedding of Mrs. Norma Preston Ames and Harry 
Scott i""k place Wednesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Ames' 
sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Willard Drown, on Washing- 
ton street, and was witnessed only by relatives and a very few close 
friends. Rev. William Kirk Guthrie of the First Presbyterian Church 
i iled. Mr. Scott and his bride left for a motor trip, which, after 
a fortnight, will take them to Medford. Oregon, where they will visil 
at the home of Mis. Ames' brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mis. 
Frank Preston. On their retain they will occupy a handsome home 
on Pacific avenue, formerly the residence of Mrs. E. W. McKinstry. 
DUCAT- BROWN. — News comes from England of the marriage of Miss 
Alice Edith Ducat and George A. Leadley-Brown, which took place in 
St. Peter's Church in Heswall on May L'Sth. The bride is a daughter 
of tli- late General C. Ducat and Mrs. Ducat,. General Ducat was 
stationed for several years at the San Francisco Presidio, and during 
that time his three daughter* mad.- their formal bows to society. 
Leadley-Brown is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leadley-Brown, of Daw- 
stone. England, where their future home will be. 
GREAVES-MOORE.— Miss Florence Greaves, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Travis Greaves, last week became the bride In Los Angeles, 
of Charles Kindness Moore. Yale graduate, tennis expert and popular 
young society man who came there from Illinois some time ago. He 
is a son of the late Birney J. Moore and Mrs. Katherine Moore of 
Evanston, 111. Mrs. Moore is a graduate of Miss Gamble's school at 
Santa Barbara, and both she and the groom have enjoyed a season 
of travel abroad. After a honeymoon trip to Lake Tahoe and Yo- 
semite Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Moore will reside In their own artistic 
bungalow at Beverly Hills. 
WHEELER-HEAD.— Miss Elizabeth Wheeler, the third daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Stetson Wheeler, became the bride of Cotesworth 
Bradway Head Tuesday evening ;ii an elaborate wedding at St. 
Luke's Church. Bishop William Ford Nichols read the marriage ser- 
vice. A reception at the home of the bride in Washington street 
followed Ha ceremony. On their return from their honeymoon. Mr. 
and Mrs. Head will make their home in Berkeley. 
TEAS. 
T'.i >XTON\— Miss Marie Payne, whose engagement to Dudley Bliss has 
been announced, was the motif for an informal tea given by Miss 
Muriel Boxton on Friday aftei 



GRAVES. — One of the enjoyable affairs of the week was the tea at which 
Mrs. Walker C. Graves entertained Friday afternoon at her home 
in Scott street, the complimented guest being .Mis, Mary E. Hart of 
Alaska. 

LUNCHEONS. 
CRITTENDEN. — Mrs. Kirby Crittenden, an attractive navy matron, win- 
is visiting relatives here, was hostess at a luncheon at the St. Francis 
last week for Mrs. Edmund Playfair and her daughter. 

MACDONALD. — Mrs. Kenneth Macdonald, Jr.. entertained informally al 
luncheon Monday afternoon at her pretty new home at Belvedere. 
Miss Lillian Bacon was the guest of honor. 

McMAHON. — Miss Metha McMahon gave an informal luncheon Wednesday 
at the Francisco Club in honor of Mrs. Wm. Randolph Hearst and 
Mrs. Martin H. Glynn. 

NICKEL. — Miss Beatrice Nickel entertained a few friends informally 
at luncheon Tuesday afternoon in her home in Laguna street. 

O'CONNOR.— Miss Lily O'Connor entertained Embassador and Mrs. Geo. 
T. Marye at a delightful luncheon at the Burlingame Country Club 
the first of the week. 

SCHWERIN. — Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin was hostess at a prettily ap- 
pointed bridge luncheon at her home in San Mateo Wednesday. 
Covers were arranged for ten. 

SCOTT. — Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott gave a luncheon in honor of Am- 
bassador and Mrs. George T. Marye Monday afternoon at the St. 
Francis. 

DINNERS. 

BRICE. — Wednesday evening. Ambassador and Mrs. Marye were the 
complimented guests at dinner at the home of Mrs. Juhn Brlce. 

CROCKER. — At a beautifully appointed dinner given by Charles Tem- 
pleton Crocker last week, twenty of Harry Scott's closest friends 
t«»a.sted him on his approaching marriage to Mrs. Norma Preston 
Ames. The dinner took place in the red room of the Bohemian Club. 

DE YOl'NG.— A large dinner party was given last week by Mr. and Mrs. 
M. H. de Young at their home in California street, in honor of Mr. ami 
Mrs. Randolph Hearst and Ambassador ami Mrs. George T. Marye. 

HUTTON. — Captain and Mrs. Frank Hutton entertained at a charmingly 
appointed dinner Monday evening at their Quarters at Fort McDowell, 
the complimented guest being Lieutenant Thomas Rees. Jr. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin entertained twenty friends at dinner 
Monday evening, her guests of honor being Ambassador and Mrs. 
George T. Marye. 

MICHAEL.— Mr. and Mrs Fred Kohl and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin 
were the guests of Frank Michael at dinner Monday evening. 
DANCES. 

BRAVERMAN. — Miss Florence Braverman gave an informal dance Sat- 
urday evening in honor of Miss Hazel Bliss. 

HOLMES. — Miss Elizabeth Holmes was hostess at a dance Tfaursda: 
the Se<juoia Club in honor of Miss May Rldgeway, of Los Angeles. 

SCRIBNER. — Mr. and Mrs. Othello Scribner gave a dance Wednesday 
ling at the Ingleside Country Club in honor of their niece, Miss 
Kate Crocker. 

CARDS. 

WHITE. — Mrs. Ralston White was hostess at a bridge party Friday af- 
ternoon, the affair taking place at the Marin County Golf Club. The 
honored guest on this occasion was Mrs. White's sister, Mrs. Law- 
rence Metcalf Symmes, 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

WHITNEY. — Mrs. Vincent Whitney entertained several friends at a bOZ 
parly at the Columbia on Saturday afternoon. 

ARRIVALS. 
BABCOCK. — Mr. and Mrs. Harry Nathaniel Gray are entertaining the 
tatter's mother. Mrs. John Babcock of Denver, who has been coming 

to California for her summers for many years. 

BLANDING. — After a years absence in Europe. Miss Henrietta Blandlng 
returned iiuine yesterday. 

COLEMAN.— Mr. and Mrs. .Joseph Coleman. Jr.. accompanied .Mrs Cole- 
man, Sr., to San Francisco, and are guests at the St. Francis. 

CROCKER.— Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tempi' "nicker returned fvni 

Webber Lake on Saturday. 
CROSS. — Dr. and Mrs. Charles V. Cross have returned from a month's 

visit to Miami Lodge, Wawona. and the Yosemiti- Valley. 
DONNELLY. — Miss Gertrude Donnelly, the daughter of Dr. Edward Don- 
nelly of the Napa State Hospital, Is visiting Miss Muriel Boxton at her 

home in Pierce street. 
DROWN. — Mr. and Mrs. Willard Drown have returned to their home 111 

Washington street, after an enjoyable stay of three weeks at Castle 

Crags. 
FRANKLIN.— Dr. and Mrs. Walter Scot! Franklin, who have divided their 

time for the past month between Yosemlte and Lake Tahoe, returned 

to town Saturday. 
GARCEATJ. — Mrs. Alexander Garceau is again In town, after a visit in 

Burlingame. 
GRESHAM. — Dean and Mrs. Wm. Gresham have returned from a motor 

trip through the northern pari of the State. 

HILL.— Mr. and Mrs. Horace L. Hill. Jr.. ami Mr. and Mrs. John Gall. .is 

returned yesterday from a visil i o Lak>- Tahoe. 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



IS 



HUNTER. Mrs, A. V. Hunter, "i Denver, wife of oni prominent 

i .-is Angeles to vl 

KAir.v -Mr. and Mrs. Bort Kalin have returned fr .1 short vacal 

in the Santa ('in-/. Mountains. 
KEARNEY.- Mis. Philip Kearney >> GavWrta 

i i is spending ;l week here with friends. 
LIVELY.— m [vely has returned from a several months' stay in 

Southern California, and is at the Gran 
MAYERLE. Mr. ami Mis. Qeorge Mayerle, Jr., have returned from their 

honeym trip, ind at the borne of the bride's, parents, 

Mr. an I >■ i> Reli i 

0'CONNOR.~Mlss M.ni.i O'C ior has joined her sisters, the Misses Ce- 

. i oi ■ 'Coi i. ai tin- Hotel Cecil, after a visit in Coro- 

la with Mr. ana .Mis .1 D. Spveckels. 
POTTER. — Mis. Paul Potter arrived from Alaska Friday-, and is at the 

St. Francis. 
RAJSCH.— Miss Aimee Raisch returned a day or two ago from Menlo 

Park, where she has been the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Waiter 

Scott. She was away about ten days. 
Rill.i'ii. — Mayor and Mrs. .lames Rolph. Jr.. and their three children, 

have returned from Miramar, where they have had a cottage for the 

past six weeks, 
\ AN BERGEN. — Mrs. George Van Bergen has come from Boston to spend 
SHIPP. — Mrs Earl Sliipp lias returned to San Francisco after a brief 

stay in the southern part of the State. 
SLACK.— Judge and Mrs. Charles Slack have returned from San Rafael, 

wlieie they have been visiting their son-in-law and daughter, Judge 

and Mrs. Edgar Zook. 

several weeks with relatives. 
WELCH. — Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Welch returned home last Sunday after 

three months in the East. 
WHEELER. — Mrs. Peter Lansing Wheeler and the Misses Pauline and 

Catherine Wheeler have returned to their home in Broadway, after 

several weeks in the mountains. 

DEPARTURES. 
ALLEN. — Mrs. Gilbert Allen, wife of Captain Allen, U. S. A., who has 

been visiting her mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Kent, in 

this city, left Saturday for Santa Cruz. 
BARHAM. — Mrs. Guy Baiham has left for her home in Los Angeles. 
Hi 1STW1CK— Mrs. Harry Bostwick and her children are visiting friends 

at WatsollVllle, during the absence of Mr. Bostwick In New York. 
I)E YOUNG.— Mr. and Mrs. M. H. De Young and Miss Phyllis De Young 

left the last of this week for their country home. "Meadowlands," 

in San Rafael. 
DTJTTON. — Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Dutton. accompanied by their daughter, 

Mrs. Douglas Waterman, left Wednesday for a motor trip to Reno 

by way of Lake Tahoe. They will be gone two weeks. 
I.RNN'i IN. — Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lennon have gone to Shasta Springs, 

after a visit with their aunt, Mrs. N. J. Madden. 
MOOKE. — Mrs. Pierre Moore left Saturday for Santa Barbara, where she 

will be at tlie 1 Intel Putter during the month of August. 

INTIMATIONS. 
BAKER. — Mr. and Mrs. Lcavitt Baker have given up their apartment at 

tin- llilli -rest, and taken a house in Washington street and Presidio 

avenue. 
BALDWIN.— Friends of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Baldwin are delighted i<> 

learn that they will move into their home on Steiner street on the 

tat of September. For the past year they have been living in Ross 

Valley. 
BERINGER.— Madi Joseph Berlnger. the well known singing teacher, 

,i„ has been seriously .ll. is almost well again, and will resume lei 
lasses by August 3d. 
CROCKER. Mi and lira Charles Crocker are entertaining as their 

se guest Mis. .lull" Stedman of South Bend Ind. 

l,i/ JONG \ii Isltoi to California is Mademoiselle Betti de 

Jong, of Paris She is e well known portrait painter ana a member 

• a the Jury of the Salon. 
DE SABLA. -Ml 1 ■'."".• " ' Sabla has returned from a visit In Portugal 

to 1 [on wl he was met by Mrs. de Sabla. Miss Leontine de 

s.,1,1,1, ,\ii and lie Herbert Payne and Mis Clement Tobtn. 
KBNNIMORE. Mr. and Mrs Arthur Fennlmore, who have been 111 

in pacific avenue, moved Saturdaj Into their new home In l^ike street 

Klllll.. Ml and Mis C. 1 '' '"" " M '•' v f,om 

1 ..,: .. Tahoe Thej will return to Tahoe about the end of the week, 

w eek. 
L.ONG Cap1 '", and Mi- E C Long are due to arrive In San Fran, 

nn lugusl 1 Ith aboard I hi 
McNear Mrs, Seward McNear and her daughter and son are expe 
... from the 1 spending the past 

11 His with relatives. 

MANN -Ml and Mrs. Harry l; Mann will leave San Francisco about Au- 
gust 6th lor a motor trip to the Tahoe 1 

pAYNl '" Monday in town shopping, and 

lunched I Francis with fl 

RAISCH.- Mis- Leila Raisch plan to return to San 

,.-, ,„ around the Ural of this month. 

SARGENT Mi and Mrs nt will move this week into 

new he in" ■■ ' Lake street, after having resided for several years In 

TEVIS. Mi Gordon Perls and his guest. Mr. Scott Paradise, have been 
spending tie- pest week at Lake Tahoe. 

TK.Y1S -Mrs YVm S. Tevls and her son, Lansing Tevis. have postponed 
then departure from Europe until the latter part of Aug 
w(11 1 he liisi week iii Septan 

w [ 1 lonel and Mis Hamlll »«" k 

Miard at their home In WOOdSlde 



ON rill-: BEAi 11 ,1 1 vi v/ 1 CRUZ. 

The past week has added seven days more to the perfect 
weather prevailing at Santa Cruz this year, the kind of wea- 
ther which makes us think with sorrow of poor hubby toiling 
away at home with the thermometer 110 in the shade. How 
we should love to have him here with us; nothing to do but to 
lie on the beach under a parasol and dream the hours away, 
lulled by the music of the band and the gentle murmur of the 
surf. 

Many improvements have been made by the beach manage- 
ment this year with the view of adding to the pleasure of those 
from out of town, and believe me, there's not much left to want 
for. The other day a Fresno lady suggested how nice it would 
be to have some moving pictures at the beach at night, and the 
next evening free moving pictures were announced. 

On Saturday evening last, the annual meet between the Al- 
batross Club of San Jose and the Neptune Club of Santa Cruz 
was held in the plunge, the local boys winning by a margin of 
four points after an extremely hard fought battle. On next 
Saturday and Sunday the annual visit and meet of the Olympic 
Club swimmers of San Francisco will be held in the plunge, 
for which a magnificent array of trophies has been provided. 
Such swimmers as Walter Pomeroy, Line Johnson, Kidder, 
Margaret Desch, Dorothy Becker and other famous wherever 
swimmers congregate for their prowess in the water, will take 
part, and the keenest sort of rivalry is anticipated. 



THE MODERN MAN 

Needs the inspiration and fellowship of public worship to bring him to his 
largest possihle ctliciency. Among the Churches of San Francisco which offer 
welcome and profitable ministration, is the 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
on Market Street at Octavia. A special series of mcelings bpgins Sunday. 
August 'Jnd. to continue daily for two weeks. DR. JAMES FRANCIS OF 
BOSTON will preach at :t and 7:30 and a great Gospel Chorus will be ted bj 
PROF. B. P. STOUT, Gipsy Smith's Chorus Director. 



FALL Styles and Fabrics are Awaiting Your Inspection 

L. P. KURTZMAN 

LADIES' TAILOR 

New Location 474 Geary St. San Francisco 

Telephone Prospect 3594 



Before 10 A. M. 
After lO A. M. 



Res. Phone Prospect 1973 
Studio " " 2177 



OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

FOR THE STUDY OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN DANCES 

Private Lessons Given 1443 POLK STREET 

By Appointment Only Studio 1 1 

Sketches For Vaudeville Furnished 



J. C. WILSON & CO. 



/New York Stock Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 



Offices 

MILLS BUILDING 

ind 

PALACE HOTEL 



Chicago Board of Trade 

The Stock and Bond Exchange, San Francisco 



Branch Office* 



Los Angeles San Diego 
Coronado Beach Portland. Ore 
Seattle. Wash. 



VALUABLE NEWSPAPER INFORMATION 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau 

U FIRST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Phonest Kesrny 392 J 1518 

CLIPPINGS OF ANYTHING YOU WISH 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leave* 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leaven to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for 10 cents In stamps or coin. P. T. Hop 
kins. 17 Great Jonesi 8L. N. T. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 





IjnNANCIAy 




Condition of Banks. 



State Bank Superintendent Williams 
has made public a condensed state- 
ment of the condition of the State 
and foreign commercial banks, the savings banks and the trust 
companies of San Francisco at the close of business June 30, 
when the call was made. There is given in comparison a simi- 
lar statement for June 4, 1913, the nearest corresponding date 
with this year's call. The national banks of San Francisco, 
nine in number, do not figure in this statement, not being sub- 
ject to State supervision. The combined balance sheet of the 
banks is : 

Assets. 
Loans— June 30, 1914. June 4, 1913. 

On real estate $134,344,429.05 $127,191,851.45 

On stocks and bonds 16,419,261.37 

On other collateral 2,978,675.90 20,594,991.63 

All other loans 17,138,439.40 16,205,864.28 

Overdrafts 152,683.05 208,654.85 

Bonds, etc 62,529,248.65 63,258,620.54 

Bank premises 11,191,861.74 11,548,986.97 

Other real estate 2,491,341.61 2,334,252.92 

Due from banks 21,264,102.19 18,174,675.71 

Cash — 

Specie 8,448,489.53 6,139,756.89 

Other lawful money 3,954,801.82 1,410,472.88 

Other currency 141,177.00 100,251.50 

Ex. for clearing house 1,562,407.17 1,156,470.18 

Checks and cash items 747,471.33 281,452.63 

Other resources 2,723,906.55 2,279,178.76 

Trust — 

Personal on deposit .... 122,355.50 

Realty, in trust 3,092,685.69 

Personal, in trust 9,757,755.14 



Total $299,061,092.49 

Liabilities 
June 30, 1914. 

Capital $16,428,950.00 

Surplus 11,179,444.02 

Undivided profits 2,750,270.92 

Money borrowed 450,000.00 

Due banks 8,412,995.42 

Individual deposits 239,811,703.95 

State, county and municipal 

deposits 3,196,340.78 

Postal savings deposits. . . . 185,125.27 

Other liabilities 3,352,798.94 

Trust — 

Money deposited by exec- 
utors, etc 84,982.41 

Personal, interest 122,355.50 

Trusts 13,491,125.28 



$270,885,481.19 

June 4, 1913. 

$17,620,620.00 

11,127,705.90 

5,208,436.87 

10,000.00 

7,993,652.82 

221,876,152.21 

2,541,256.50 

161,828.03 

4,345,828.86 



Total $299,061,092.49 $270,885,481.19 



The Coleman bonds of Natomas 
Natomas Finance. Consolidated have been brought into 

line for the reorganization. These 
bonds amounting to $420,000 will be taken up at 25 cents on 
the dollar. The purchase will be made in the vent that reorgan- 
ization is successfully carried through. It will be remembered 
that the Coleman's, through their attorney, J. E. McCutchen, 
threatened legal proceedings. 

A syndicate has already been formed to handle the Coleman 
bonds, provided the deal is a success. 

Frank B. Anderson, chairman of the Natomas reorganization 
committee, said yesterday: 

"Some days ago Mr. McCutchen made an offer to some of the 
members of the Natomas reorganization committee to sell his 
clients' first mortgage bonds at 25 per cent of their face value. 
Those to whom the offer was made replied they would gladly 



buy the bonds at the price mentioned, provided that the plan 
of reorganization should become effective, but otherwise they 
did not care to purchase the bonds at any price. After some 
further negotiations with Mr. McCutchen an agreement was 
entered into with his clients whereby their bonds will be pur- 
chased for the price mentioned when the reorganization plan 
becomes operative. 

"There would seem to be little or no doubt now that the re- 
organization will be consummated. More than 230 bondholders, 
owning bonds aggregating more than $4,000,000, have already 
deposited their bonds with the Mercantile Trust Company of 
San Francisco, and our last information from London was to 
the effect that the bonds at that time deposited there aggregated 
more than $3,700,000. This aggregate of $7,700,000 constitutes 
more than a majority of the bonds, and in view of the many 
bondholders who have expressed their intention of participat- 
ing there is every reason to believe that the plan will soon be 
declared operative. 

"All bondholders are being given opportunity of becoming 
parties to the plan. Those who fail to deposit their bonds on 
or before August 15th, will not be entitled to any of the benefits 
of the organization. Such bondholders will be expected to 
look after their own interests in the event of foreclosure. 



The Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
For Gas Consumers. pany has offered consumers the same 

right as stockholders and employees 
to subscribe to any part of the $12,500,000 first preferred 
stock that has been authorized. In its offer the company says : 
"A number of our consumers have requested the privilege of 
joining in this subscription, thus obtaining an opportunity of 
sharing in the profits of the company and possessing a voice in 
its management. Believing it to be to the advantage of the 
company as well as its consumers that the stock should be dis- 
tributed to as large an extent as possible among the representa- 
tive citizens of California who are consumers, the directors of 
the company hereby extend an invitation to all consumers to 
purchase a portion of the first preferred stock directly from the 
company at the minimum price authorized by the Railroad Com- 
mission. This stock may be paid for in full or in installments, 
in all respects upon the same terms and conditions heretofore 
offered to the company's own stockholders and employees. 
Consumers may subscribe at any time prior to August 15, 1914, 
upon the form enclosed herewith, for as many shares as they 
may desire, the company reserving the right, however, to termi- 
nate this offer before August 15, 1914, and to return any sub- 
scriptions that may be received after the issue has been sold." 



Frank C. Havens has announced 
People's Water Company, his retirement as president of the 

People's Water Company. At a 
meeting of the directors and the refunding committee, consist- 
ing of John S. Drum, P. E. Bowles and W. W. Garthwaite, J. 
Y. Eccleston was named as Havens' successor. Havens is now 
in the East. His resignation was telegraphed to the refunding 
committee several days ago, but made public to-day. Havens 
owns almost all the preferred stock of the water company and 
a large portion of the bonds. These he still keeps in escrow. 
Havens' resignation was accepted without comment. W. R. 
Alberger was appointed manager of the water corporation af- 
ter Eccleston was elected president. The following directors 
were chosen; John S. Drum, E. A. Heron, J. Y. Eccleston, H. 
C. Capwell, Frank A. Leach, George N. O'Brien and H. G. 
Tasheira. It was announced that the Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany of San Francisco held a majority of the stock of the com- 
pany, under control of the refunding committee, and that the 
future policy of the company would be to operate under strict 
supervision of the State Railroad Commission. 



In connection with the proposed 
Spring Valley Purchase, purchase of the Spring Valley 

Water Works by the city at the 
tentative figure of $34,500,000, the board of supervisors is con- 
sidering a proposition to divide the money impounded by the 
court in the rate litigation between the city and the corpora- 
tion. In this connection it is pointed out that the city has no 
right to any of this money. It belongs either to the corpora- 
tion or the ratepayers. 






August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



I ffix0M0BI, ttrl 


0\v v 





ii .nihyimntimiir. 



By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

A Helping Hand 

At times the editor of a motoring magazine, and in fact any 
publication, comes to believe that the average motorist is sel- 
fish, cold and lacks a fellow feeling. 

Most of these remarks are the result of experience claimed 
by some owner. However, of late, personal contact under ad- 
verse circumstances with the traveling motor public, and in fact 
all those who come in touch with the motorist while touring 
through the State, has caused the editorial department of the 
News Letter to think that the most of these complaints are not 
the result of treatments that the motorists receive without, but 
lies principally at the fault of those making the complaint. 

Recently a motorist was in trouble on Alta Hill, just outside 
of Sausalito. There was a breakdown, and no chance of mak- 
ing repairs, at least until the next day. Any number of passing 
motorists offered help and assistance. Dr. W. A. Harvey of 
San Francisco, took part of those that were in the stranded 
machine and brought them into Alta, so it was possible to reach 
Sausalito by train. The doctor's car was carrying its full com- 
plement, but he made room to carry another passenger if it was 
only a lift to the railroad station. 

Shortly after, Walter N. Gabriel, of Oakland, came along in 
his car and offered assistance, and took the remaining members 
of the party in his car to Sausalito, where they were able to 
get the boat to meet the rest of the party that had gone on be- 
fore. This assistance was offered at a time when every minute 
counted, for the reason that it was at the end of a two days 
holiday, and hundreds of motorists were returning to San Fran- 
cisco, and every minute late meant just that much behind the 
others who were waiting for the boat, and so much longer until 
transportation could be secured across the bay. Motorists will 
find that if they extend courtesy to others that in time of need 
they will reap the same benefits and accommodations, and that 
the whole motoring public and the public at large are always 

ready to help one in distress. 

* • * 

Action Taken by Cmtest Board 

At the July meeting of the Contest Board held at A. A. A. 
National Headquarters, the following action was taken : Omar 
Toft of Los Angeles, a Registered Racing Driver, was disquali- 
fied and suspended to January 1, 1916, because of his connec- 
tion with the entry of the Delage car for the Vanderbilt Cup 
Race over the Santa Monica course last February. The Delage 
car failed to report for start and no excuse was presented to 
the referee for such omission, and a careful investigation of the 
circumstances in relation to this entry showed that there was 
no sincere intention in the first instance to have the car compete. 

* • * 

For the Lincoln Highway 

Two hundred dollars was taken in at a dance given for the 
benefit of the Lincoln Highway at the Odd Fellows' Hall in 
Placerville, Cal., recently. This is a new way of raising Lin- 
coln Highway funds. 

* » « 

Big Registration 

Automobile registrations as compiled by the State Depart- 
ment of Engineering, up to closing time July 25th, are as fol- 
lows: Automobiles, 107,678; motorcycles, 22,653; chauffeurs, 
15,347; operators, 121,001. The receipts amount to $1,257,000. 

* * * 

Iowa License 

Iowa motor car owners who have failed to pay State license 
fees in other years must pay the back taxes even if their cars 



were owned by other persons prior to this year. Such is the 
ruling of the State motor car department under the supervision 
of W. S. Allen, Secretary of State. Litigation is sure to result, 
as many owners threaten to bring test cases. It has been found 
that in many cases where fees are tendered for 1914 number 
plates, there was no fee paid in 1913, and in some cases per- 
mitted the operation of cars during a period of at least one 
whole year without registration. New numbers are being re- 
fused until back taxes are paid. 

* » * 

Blew Up OH Well Country 

One person is dead in the Cushing oil fields in Northern Ok- 
lahoma, and six seriously burned as the result of explosions 
of gas along the roads of the field from burning motor car 
lamps. In both instances the members of the motoring parties 
failed to extinguish their lamps before they reached the danger 
zones. The machines were enveloped in flames, and the death 
of all members of both parties was narrowly averted. So 
heavy have been the fumes of the escaping gas recently that 
all persons passing through the fields have taken the precau- 
tion of extinguishing their lights and danger zones have been 
marked. 

* * * 

Auto Uiider Ban 

The motor car was placed under the ban recently by the 
German Baptist Church at a national convention held on a 
farm near Frankfort, Ind. Only three delegates voted in favor 
of the use of the gasoline-propelled vehicle, while more than 
300 turned down their thumbs on it. The resolution passed ad- 
vised "all churches not to allow their members to own or oper- 
ate motor cars, motor trucks, motorcycles or any motor vehicle, 
at least until such time as they become in general use, or until 

we get more light on the subject." 

* * * 

California Flowers 

Motorists and others returning from mountain trips are bring- 
ing fine flowering specimens of Fremontia California, a beauti- 
ful shrub named for General John C. Fremont. It has thick 
but small three lobed leaves with prominent veins and a yel- 
lowish rust color on the under side. The bright buff-yellow 
flowers have a five-lobed calyx, and each lobe is a half-inch or 
more long, nearly as broad, shows a prominent mid-vein on the 
back of each calyx lobe and the base of the flower runs from 
yellow into green. This description should enable any one to 

identify this very profuse flowering shrub. 

* * * 

Steel In Tlrea 

Steel making may play an important part in the production 
of rubber tires, the tires appearing as by-products of the steel, 
according to a paper read before the Iron and Steel Institute 
in London, England. ' The president of the institute declared 
that from the hydrocarbon gases that are evolved by blast fur- 
naces the complex hydrocarbons that are constituents of rub- 
ber may be obtained, and experiments show that it may be 
possible to manufacture artificial rubber from the gas by-pro- 
ducts of steel making. 

* * * 

Good Manners 

It is not good manners to come honking and squawking up 
behind a brother motorist who happens to be jogging at the re- 
spectable rate of twenty miles per hour, as if you were coming 



TIRES 



We not only sell the BEST TIRES-"DELUXE 
-FEDERAL— DIAMOND-- FISK — MILLER 
and NASSAU," but pride ourselves on the 

SERVICE 

we give our customers 

SCHMID-JEFFRESS COMPANY 

545 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco 

PHONE PARK 1041 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 



through at around sixty. Then, when the twenty-mile man 

draws politely aside and lets you pass, to pull over in front 

of him and drop into a twenty mile jog yourself, and give him 

the benefit of the dust for a mile or two as a reward for his 

politeness. 

» * * 

Digs Tank and Strikes Gold Mine 

A. D. Snyder, a garage owner of Grass Valley, is likely to 
retire from the garage business and become a miner. In mak- 
ing repairs on his garage recently, he, in digging up the earth 
underneath the building, dug up a quantity of gold. After hav- 
ing it assayed, he is now debating whether it would be more 
profitable to give up catering to the wants of automobilists and 
go into mining, or whether mining, which was profitable in by- 
gone days, will pay as much as catering to the wants of auto- 
mobilists. To some people both seem to be a good gold mine. 

The gold mine underneath the garage was discovered by 
accident, and Snyder had engaged some men to make an ex- 
cavation for an oil tank. The men, who knew considerable 
about mining, noticed that gold could be seen in all the rocks 
taken out. So good were the indications that all thought of a 
pit for the oil tank was given up, and Snyder told the men to 
sink for a nine. And the valuable rock encountered shows that 
his judgment was good. As the shaft is sunk, the indications 

are showing better daily. 

* * * 

All Must Carry Lights 

A revision of Cleveland's traffic ordinances provides that 
every vehicle, motor or horse-drawn, must be equipped with 
tail lights. The clause is a drastic departure in the new 
"safety first" ordinance, operative on everything but a baby 
carnage. Every vehicle carrying material which projects be- 
yond the dimensions of the vehicle must have a light hanging 

on the end of the cargo. 

* * * 

Ford Employers Must Be Citizens 

Henry Ford, president of the Ford Automobile Company, 
will have none but American citizens in his employ. Through 
the naturalization of three alien employees of the Ford plant 
in Los Angeles, it became known that a general order has been 
issued by Ford ordering all aliens in his employ to either be- 
come citizens of the United States or resign their positions. 
The order was received from Detroit several days ago, and 
will affect probably one hundred men in the local plant, all 
of whom, it was said, had declared they would at once perfect 
themselves for the required examination, rather than lose their 
$5 a day jobs. 

* * * 

Ohio Good Roads 

Ohio's roads are slowly being given permanent surfacing, 
Bulletin No. 22, recently issued by the Ohio State Highway 
Department, showing that over one-third of the 573 miles of 
road built in the State during the last seven years has been of 
permanent brick or concrete construction. More than 300 
miles were built and contracted for during each of the two fis- 
cal years ending in 1912 and 1913, of which 62 miles were of 
brick and 62 of concrete construction. 

The first concrete road contracted for by the department was 
put down in July, 1911. The city of Bellefontaine, Ohio, laid 
the first concrete pavement in the country 22 years ago, and 
it is still giving excellent service. 

Most of the concrete roads built in 1912 were given a bitu- 
minous wearing surface, such as has been adopted for the 
trunk line system in California, but the results were not satis- 
factory^ and the Ohio Highway Department is now building 
plain, single-course concrete roads of 1, l l / 2 , 3 mix, the same 
as the Wayne County, Mich., commissioners. 

The average cost per foot in width one mile long of different 
kinds of roads built in Ohio last year was as follows: Brick, 
$1,379; bituminous treated concrete, $807; plain concrete, $843; 
two-course bituminous macadam, $779; one-course, $420; two- 
course, water bound slag macadam, $605; two-course, water 
bound macadam, $550; one-course, $340; two-course watei 
bound gravel macadam, $169; graded roadway, $117. The 
average width of the metaled surface of the Ohio roads is 
fourteen feet. A table of the total road mileage in the State 
shows 440 miles of brick roads, 78 of concrete, 12,000 of mac- 
adam, and 15,600 of gravel. 



Men of the Grip at Akron 

Six hundred United Commercial Travelers swarmed over the 
huge rubber factories of the B. F. Goodrich Company at Akron, 
Ohio, recently, during the Ohio State Convention of that or- 
ganization. The delegates expressed themselves as deeply im- 
pressed with the fact that "safety first" is as much a part of the 
Goodrich plant as it is of the Goodrich product. In going 
through part of the seventy-five acres of floor space in the huge 
rubber plant, the visitors found signs, notices, employee's in- 
structions and many other devices, all accenting the same prin- 
ciple — "safety first" for all who make Goodrich Tires, as well 
as for those who use them. 

In addition to inspecting the fabric and cord tire building, the 
visitors saw miles and miles of rubber belting being made, and 
an immense variety of molded rubber goods and mechanical 
goods in process of manufacture. They said that the apparent 
safety for the 15,000 employees in the world's largest rubber 
factory was a revelation to them., as showing how The Goodrich 
Company makes the safety principle, which it builds into its 
automobile tires, work out for the benefit of the people who do 
the tire building. 

* * • 
Federal Double-Cable Base Tire 

"The Federal double-cable-base tire is one of the most ser- 
viceable on the market to-day," says Pacific Coast Manager E. 
L. Rettig, in speaking of the Federal tires. "The Federal dou- 
ble-cable-base is the new tire construction that fortifies the 
buyer against tire troubles. For instance, side wall breaking, 
which is often called rim cutting, is eliminated by the flexible 
bead filler built into the Federal double-cable-base tires, which 
prevents the cutting action on the side wall fabric, common to 
all tires in which a high, stiff, hard bead-filler is used. 

"The blowing of tire over rim positively cannot occur with 
the double-cable-base construction. The double cables form 
a strong, unbreakable anchorage of the tire to the rim, making 
it impossible for the bead to stretch, nreak or the tire to blow 
over the rim while in service. 

"The pinching of inner tube is entirely overcome by the strong 
and perfect heel and toe anchorage of the tire base to the rim. 
This prevents tipping or shifting of the tire base, and the tube 
cannot possibly become pinched under the toe of the bead." 

¥ » » 
Klssel-Kar Popular 

John H. Eagal, of the Kissel-Kar branch here, says that the 
new two-door body design is extremely popular with the ladies. 
Eagal says : "The wide doors, giving plenty of room to clear 
the clothing in entering or leaving the car, and the added socia- 
bility that the individual front seats permit, are two strong rea- 
sons for the favor of the fair ones. Aside from that, the new 
design is exceptionally smart and handsome, and the discrimi- 
nating woman motorist likes individual and exclusive style in 
her car." 

* * » 

Bosch Takes Rushmore 

The largest merger in the electrical accessory field as applied 
to the automobile allied industries took place on July 11th, on 
which day the Bosch Magneto Company of New York, the 
largest magneto and ignition specialty manufacturer, absorbed 
one of the oldest electrical manufacturing concerns in the 
United States, the Rushmore Dynamo Works of Plainfield, 
N. J. 



Ask your 
Dealer for 

Goodyear 

"Hippo" 

Hose 




GOODYEAR RUBBER COMPANY 



K. H PEASE. TrmMmu 



. S91. 5W Mirkel St. 



Tin b«t ind 

itrenfeit 
Gsrd«o Hoi* 

Cuanotaed I* 

II. od 700 lb. 
Preamr* 

TRY IT AND 

BE CONVINCED 

SiaFl 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



37-45 First Street Phone Sutter 2230 

Private Exchange Connecting All Departments 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 




R. F. (Bob) Thompson, newly appointed manager of the 
Howard Automobile Company. 

— Photo M. Dalilgren. 
"Bob" Thompson Manager 

Since the recent announcement of the retirement of R. K. 
Roberts from the management of the Howard Automobile Com- 
pany, one of the chief topics discussed along automobile row 
has been who will fill the position vacated by Roberts. 

The Howard Automobile Company has the distinction of hav- 
ing handled the Buick car on the Pacific Coast since 1905, and 
their business has grown from 75 Buicks in 1905 to more than 
5,000 Buicks in 1914, and their territory has grown from San 
Francisco and vicinity to the entire western section of the 
United States, as well as the Hawaiian and Philippine Islands. 

The management of the Howard organization is without doubt 
the top round in the automobile ladder of success on the Pacific 
Coast, and is one of the most coveted positions in the automo- 
bile world. 

R. B. (Bob) Thompson has been advanced to the manager- 
ship, and his many friends are congratulating him on his good 
fortune. He is one of the best known and best liked man in the 
automobile business, and is particularly well adapted to fill the 
high position which he now occupies. 

He has been identified with the automobile industry since its 
infancy, and has been directly connected with the Howard Au- 
tomobile Company since 1910. One of his most notable suc- 
cesses was the establishment of the Buick agencies throughout 
the country, and another was the establishment of the Buick 
system of service, which covers the entire coast. 

Thompson will continue the same general policy in the man- 
agement of the Buick organization that has brought it up to its 
present high efficiency, and with the few improvements which 
he anticipates making, Buicks will be more popular than ever 

before. 

• • » 

Sturdy Mitchell 

Osen-McFarland Company, local distributers of the Mitchell 
cars, has just received a letter from George O. Jorgensen, of 
Penn Grove, which tells of the sturdy construction of the Mit- 
chell cars. 

Jorgensen, after purchasing a Mitchell "six" in this city, de- 
cided to drive it to his home in Penn Grove. All went well until 
Jorgensen struck a bridge and dashed through two of the heavy 
railings on the side. He quickly applied the brakes. They 
held, and the car stopped with the front wheel resting on one 
of the heavy underpinnings of the bridge. Jorgensen got out, 
expecting to see his fender badly smashed and a hole in his 
radiator. But nothing of the sort occurred. The fender was 
not even bent, and there was no trace of a mishap, save for a 
slight scratch on the fender, where it hit the rail. 



Co'e Promotion* 

A. S. Blakely, prominently identified with the editorial end 
of the automobile industry, has joined the Cole family. He- 
will have charge of the factory publicity department. H. C. 
Bradfield, previously in charge of the department, has been 
promoted to field sales representative. Blakely is directly asso- 
ciated with Homer McKee, who is in charge of the Cole's sales 
and advertising. He joins the Cole organization after having 
resigned as assistant to the president of the Indianapolis Ameri- 
can Association Baseball Club, with which organization he be- 
came connected in March of this year. 

» * * 

MacManus Moves 

The Dunlap-Ward Advertising Company, of Detroit and 
Chicago, has announced the affiliation of Theodore F. Mac- 
Manus, formerly president of the MacManus Company. The 
move is regarded as one of the most important developments in 
the advertising agency business in seme years, and is being 
widely discussed by the advertising fraternity in this city. 

* • • 
Jeffery Factory Representative 

E. W. Milburn, of the Thomas B. Jeffery Company, has been 
appointed district representative for California for the makers 
of Jeffery cars. Milburn will make his headquarters in San 
Francisco at the Jeffery Auto Sales Company, who are whole- 
sale and retail distributers for this section. 

* * * 
Marmon Service 

Of eighteen Marmon cars in livery service of the Horace F. 
Wood Transfer Co., of Indianapolis, seven of them have a total 
mileage of more than a million miles. The two oldest cars in 
service have covered nearly half of this distance themselves; 
one car having made two hundred and fifty thousand miles and 
another one. over two hundred thousand miles. The Woods 
Company has used Marmon cars exclusively in their automobile 
livery since 1909, each car in their fleet having made from 25,- 
000 to 250,000 miles. 

Horace F. Wood, President of the company, said recently 
that they had not lost one day a month on an average with any 
of these cars, and that each one of them was in service every 
day. This record for continuous daily service for automobile 
is one that has seldom if ever been equaled. The photograph 
shows thirteen of these cars, the other five being on duty when 

the picture was taken. 

* * * 

Botavia Tires on Flat 

Dave Lewis, who drove a Fiat in the Santa Monica race, 
used the Batavia tire equipment on his car, and in writing of the 
service he received says : 

"Am returning to you the two Batavia tires used by me in 
the Grand Prize race at Santa Monica on February 28th for 
display if you should so care to use them. These two tires 
were mounted on the rear of my big 120 h. p. Fiat after I had 
blown out five rear tires of another well known make at the end 
of the tenth lap, or 84 miles. I continued on Batavias for an 
additional 92 miles, when unfortunately my car developed en- 
gine trouble, and I withdrew from the race with these two tires 
still in wonderfully fine condition, as you can see. 

"I am satisfied that I could have completed the balance of 
the 403 miles on these same tires without any tire trouble what- 
ever, and say without exception that they are the best tires I 
have ever used in my racing experience." 



Are We On the Right Road ? 

This Question doom*! have to be asked when you ha\ •■ 

THE HANCOCK ROAD BOOK 

The invaluable suide to motorist*. 64 pages of accurate maps and 
routes rov-Tin? California from .San Bernardino to Oregon line and part of 
Nevadi ijita on all roads to Yoaemire Valley Including I 

\,.ii compact and can **' carried handily in the coat pocket Onlj one- 
.juarter inch thick. Bound in cloth. Price $1.00. At supply ho 
stationer- or 



Jfytmcccw 




263 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 



Llnz-Sanborn Get Hupp 

Linz-Sanborn Motor Company has been appointed distribut- 
ers of the Hupmobile car in Northern California by A. B. Park- 
man, factory representative on the Pacific Coast. Both Fred 
Linz and Luke Sanborn, of the local firm, are highly popular in 
this territory, and have a following of agents who are equally 
as popular in their respective localities. This naturally means 
that the Hupmobile will start the season with a good organiza- 
tion to handle it, and the year should prove one of the best for 
the company in this district. 

* * * 

New Bulck Model Arrives 

The Model C-25 Buick touring car is the latest 1915 car to 
arrive on automobile row. It is also the first of the new Buicks, 
and if the other four 1915 Buick models show as much improve- 
ment as this model, the Howard Automobile Company will have 
no trouble in disposing of the 5,000 Buicks which they have or- 
dered from the big factory at Flint, Michigan. R. F. Thomp- 
son, manager of the Howard Automobile Company, Pacific 
Coast distributers of Buick cars, in speaking of the new Buick, 
says: "Of course, we are enthusiastic over the new cars. It is 
only natural that we should be. This enthusiasm, however, 
seems to be contagious, as almost every one who has seen the 
new cars is just as enthusiastic over them as we are. 

"It has always been the Buick policy to build their cars in 
such a way, and of such material, that they would give the own- 
ers the maximum of service at the minimum expense at all 
times, and there has never been any deviation from this policy. 
As a result of it, there are any number of Buicks from six to 
ten years old, many of them with road records of more than 
100,000 miles, in daily service at this time. These old cars 
are not particularly handsome, nor were they when sold, but 
the fact that they are still running and giving satisfaction proves 
that they were built in the right way and of right material. 

"Some of the more important improvements in the new 25 
Buicks are : Longer wheel base and longer and more flexible 
springs, insuring easier riding. Longer hood and curved cowl, 
giving better lines to the entire car. Single post ventilating 
wind shield, improved Delco lighting, starting and ignition 
system, with all wire enclosed in flexible conduit. Greatly im- 
proved fan and radiator, insuring efficiency of cooling system at 
all times, and the equipment of all the models is absolutely com- 
plete. Even the number brackets are supplied." 
* * * 

Long Tour In Overland 

George E. Townsend has just completed a fourteen hundred 
mile two weeks' vacation trip in his Overland car. During that 
time he went as far north as the Rogue River Country. The 
trip north was made by the way of Eureka, Crescent City, 
Grant's Pass to Medford, thence along the Rogue River up to 
Crater Lake. Townsend got within half a mile of the Lake, 
when he was forced to return, as the snow became too deep. 
He ran into over three feet of it, with it getting deeper. 

Coming south, he came by way of Klamath Falls over the 
Ager road from Klamath River to Ager, ther.ce to Montague 
down the Sacramento Canyon by way of Dunsmuir, Redding 
and Sacramento. Townsend reports the roads in splendid con- 
dition this year, and that there seems to be more travel than 
ever before. The fact that many sections of the State highway 
can be used in California as well as improved roads in Oregon. 
The motor car owners along the border line have been going 
farther away from home than ever before. 
» • • 

Firestone's Treat 

A procession of forty automobiles curved through the streets 
of Akron bright and early on July 11th into the open road, 
headed for the old Firestone homestead eight miles away. The 
party was composed exclusively of superintendents and fore- 
men of the Firestone tire and rim factories. No. 170. It was a 
factory family affair, with H. S. Firestone as host. 
» * * 

Mlchelln Dealers 

The Michelin Tire Company, of Milltown, N. J., has just is- 
sued a most interesting directory where Michelin tires may be 
secured throughout the United States; it gives a list of thirty- 
three hundred dealers who handle Michelin tires, and is of great 
service to the owner who uses this equipment. 



New Velles Here 

The complete line of new Velie cars for 1915 is now on ex- 
hibition in the show room of the Reliance Automobile Company, 
1529-1541 Van Ness avenue. These new cars, which have just 
arrived, present developments of the stream line type of design 
which are entirely new to Automobile construction. Probably 
the most conspicuous feature is the comfort which is brought 
to the occupants of the front seats as well as to the occupants 
of the rear seat. This is obtained by an unusually deep space 
in the front compartment. Not only is there ample room for 
even the largest man to operate the control pedals with perfect 
ease, but there is additional room which affords a feeling of 

luxury and comfort which is hard to describe. 
* * * 

Jeffery Company's New Representatives 

Important additions to the dealers' organization of the Jef- 
fery Company were made recently when announcement was 
made of the appointment of the Frank C. Riggs Company of 
Portland, Oregon, as Jeffery distributers for that State, and 
McArthur Brothers, of Phoenix, Arizona, as Jeffery distributers 
for Arizona. Both have attained success as Packard dealers in 
their respective territories. 



Shockless Ease 
Tru&ndt - Htatfoxd 

SHOCK ABSORBER 

' ' The Pioneer and The Best ' ' 

Equip your car, or buy it already 
equipped, with Truffault-Hartford 
Shock Absorbers. The only means 
by which you can secure all the 
comfort that your investment in 
a car demands. The one sure 
way to save springs and axles — ^ 
increase speed — make safety f 
certain. Now standard equip- \ T 
ment for twenty-five of the 
country's leading cars. 

The only shock absorber that 
controls the spring by the right and 
proven principle of frictional resis- 
tance 

Send for Catalog now— today. Four 
models, $16, $35, 850, £60. Can be 
fitted to any car. Fit yours. 

Insist Upon Tniffault-Harrfords on Your New Car 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION CO. 

EDWARD V. HARTFORD, Pre.. 
Office and Works: 174 Bay St., Jersey City.N. J. 

Manufacturers of Hartford F.lectrjc Starling 
and Lighting System 

DISTRIBUTORS 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 



Portland Oakland 

San Francisco 



Los Angeles Seattle 

Spokane Fresno 




August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



A Fine Touring Map 

Hancock Brothers of San Francisco have just issued a revised 
edition of the Hancock Automobile and Motorcycle Road Book. 
This is the third issue of this most valuable publication. 

The latest issue of the Hancock Road Book is by far the most 
valuable of any. The maps, instead of as in previous issues 
being separate, are now worked in on each page, making it eas- 
ier to handle and more satisfactory for the man that is driving. 

These maps are more valuable than any we have seen for 
the section covered. They take in roads and places which the 
ordinary map does not mention. There being no desire on the 
part of the publishers to only mention such routes and places 
that advertise. Hancock Brothers have given this map very 
serious consideration, and have produced something of value. 

* * * 

New Franklin Arrives 

John F. McLain, of John F. McLain Company, announces the 
arrival of the 1915 Franklin "six-thirty," which is on display 
at the salesrooms of the local distributors, and at the firm's 
branch in Oakland. 

McLain, in speaking of the car, says: "The car is a little 
larger, with many added refinements, the weight remaining prac- 
tically the same. It is much snappier because of mechanical re- 
finements and high efficiency tires, has better and more equip- 
ment, a new top of the one-man type, and a new glass front of 
double glass, rain-vision type. The speedometer, starter and 
light switches, gasoline, air and oil controls are all on cowl 
control board. The car is equipped with a power tire pump 
and a combination baggage and tire carrier, and the new body, 
new hood, and new mud guards make the car better looking than 
ever. The Franklin concern has always been foremost in devel- 
oping automobile materials and in perfecting efficient manufac- 
turing methods. At the outset they started with more of the 
right fundamental principles of good designing than any other 
manufacturer. The company was first to use electric furnace 
alloy steel in springs, first to develop a valve in the head motor, 
first to exploit Single ignition in this country, and so on down 
the line. 

"The company was first with the four-cylinder car, first with 
the six-cylinder, first with light weight and scientific construc- 
tion." 

* * * 

Lee Tires on Racers 

The racing fever has struck the Northwest. The contest at 
Tacoma brought out some keen racing, and the indications are 
that next year the towns of the Northwest will program events 
on such dates that with the big events in San Francisco and 
those planned for the southern part of the State, it will mean a 
continuous racing fever during the time of the big fair in San 
Francisco. In writing of the Tacoma races, W. A. Avery, Seat- 
tle manager of Chanslor & Lyon Company, writes : 

"We had nine of the racing cars equipped with Lee tires, 
and the service they gave proved conclusively that Lee tire 
equipment will be a factor in the racing on the coast in the 
future. The service station at the pits was Girnwald, our city 
tire man, and the husky porter of the concern." 



MACHINE WORK 
BLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 



J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM. 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



ED. F. HENDRICKS 

Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave. 
At Gough St.. San Francisco 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

FRANCIS BROS.. Managers 
NEW ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF GARAGE 



PHONE 
PROSPECT 1915 



1120 POST STREET 
Near Van New ATenue 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere In United States, Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO 



OF HARTFORD 
PACIFIC BRANCH - 301 California Street 

Telephone Sutter 3010 



San Francisco 



Tips to Automobilists 

(CUT THIS OUT.) 
The News Letter recommends the following garagea, hotels and aupply 
houses. Tourists will do well to cut this list out and keep It as a guide: 



SONOMA COUNTY. 
».S A Ii TA R ° SA -~GRAND GARAGE. Under new management Third 
and Main street, opposite the court house. Phone 166 Fhlest eauipped 
ITopr C i e "or n,ent Sarage ° f a " y in S ° n0ma C0unt * GEORGE 'a^KOSs! 



e P »? TA !r UM ^ PETALUMA GARAGE AND MACHINE SHOP Sr^rks 

£,„ MUr , Phy ' ?r° PS - C , or - Third and C Sts.; PhoWe Main 3 Autornobtles 
fubStfr^i"? h * a ,? d ee l T cuttln * : ««PP«es. repairing, auto »very : 
lubricating oil and gasoline; the care and charging of storag e batteries: 

w S0 ^ N ?. MA .' CA L.— MISSION GARAGE (Fireproof). Phone Main 741 E 
e!c G ExD n erf wS;„,h U " 2S" of supplies, vulcinizing. machine shop.' 
hours pert workm anship only. Service car and auto livery at all 



NAPA COUNTY. 

ST. HELENA, CAL.— NAPA VALLEY GARAGE. R. A. Blum Prop 

ii^L? 2 e ■ : n ' ght ph . one 853 ' Su PPHes, oils, general repairing. Auto 

f'o V r e, S-itc h S en V a C n e d F^dVrs' h ° UrS - E " pert ™ k ™P only. Agency 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 
MILPITAS.— AUTO SUPPLIES. Electric welding. Complete machine 
shop. Expert mechanics. Sp angler Brothers. Tel. San Jose 2603— R. 2. 

PALO ALTO.— LARKIN'S CAFE— just opened. The only strictly first- 
class cafe on the Wishbone Route devoted to the patronage of automobile 
Corner of University avenue and The Circle. 



owners and their families. 



SAN JOSE.— LAMOLLE GRILL, 36-38 North First street. The best 
French dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties 
given particular attention. 

PALO ALTO.— PALO ALTO GARAGE, 443 Emmerson St.. Tel., P A 
333. Auto livery at all hours. Tires and sundries In stock. Gasoline, oil, 
repairing, lathework, vulcanizing. Open day and night. 

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 
BEACH HILL INN. — Location best In Santa Cruz, on crest of Beach 
Hill. 1 block from beach; 2 blocks from Casino; view of sea and moun- 
tain; appointments unique; garage near by. Address MISS A. PORTER. 



Lathe Work, (Jolted States or Metric Screw Cut 

Automobile Work a Specialty. American or Foreign Cars 

A Full Line of Parts and Accessories. Also Hand-Made Oil-Tempered 

Springs Always on Hand 

AUTO MACHINE WORKS 



MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS 



Phone Franklin 6893 



350 Golden Gate Avenue 
Bat. nyde and Larkin 8ts. 



Phone Sutter 300 



Pacific Sightseeing Co., Prop. 



FOURTH ST. GARAGE 



FOURTH & HARRISON STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Commercial Trucks 
A Specialty 



Automobile 
Supplies 



The attention of owners of pleasure cars living In San Mateo 
County Is called to the convenience of this Garage to Third 
and Townsend Street Depot. 

THE LARGEST GROUND FLOOR FIREPROOF CARAGE WEST Or CHICAGO 




The Oil of Quality 

New York Lubricating 
Company 

57 6 Second Street 
San Francisco 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 



Lake County Roads 

R. L. Sargeant, of the Fisk Rubber Company, has returned 
from, an auto trip through Lake County, and reports the roads 
to be in excellent condition. An ideal week-end trip is to go 
to Martinez by the Oakland tunnel road ferry to Benicia, and 
thence to Vallejo, Napa and Calistoga, over excellent roads. 
After climbing Mt. St. Helena, just outside of Calistoga, one 
can proceed to Lakeport or Kelseyville, and avoid Cobb Moun- 
tain and Battle Glass Mountain by taking the road to Howard 
Springs and Siegler Springs, thereby avoiding two steep moun- 
tain climbs. The road from Lakeport to Cloverdale over the 
Pieta Grade is in excellent condition, and there are numerous 
places for machines to pass each other. The entire round trip 
figures two hundred and fifty miles, and can easily be made in 

two days. 

* * * 

Will Boost Overland Sales 

General Manager A. D. Plughoff, of J. W. Leavitt & Com- 
pany, has just announced the appointment of F. G. Hood as 
country retail sales manager. Hood will travel throughout the 
country, helping the agents of Overland cars close sales which 
they have worked up. Hood has long experience with the 
Haynes Auto Sales Company, and several of the other promi- 
nent firms, and is well acquainted with the necessities and de- 
sires of automobile buyers of the present day. 

At the same time Plughoff announced that C. Shockley, for 
some years connected with the Studebaker Corporation, has 
joined the selling force of J. W. Leavitt & Company, and will 
devote his time to the wholesale sales of Overland cars 
throughout the coast territory over which the company has 
jurisdiction. The appointment of these two means the strength- 
ening of the outside working force of the company. 

• * * 

New Regals Here 

Among the handsomest new cars to arrive as representing the 
latest models are the Regals, direct from the big factory at De- 
troit. The Frank O. Renstrom Company, Regal distributers, 
have just received a big consignment of these new cars, and 
they are attracting all kinds of attention, not only on the part 
of prospective purchasers, but from the automobile men as 
well. This new car takes the place of what is called the model 
C, an overhung car, the frame of the new car also being sus- 
pended above the axles. The Regal factory always did manu- 
facture an overhung car, that being their first model eight years 
ago, and it has never been discontinued. 



REPUBLIC 
STAGGARD TREAD 

Quality Tires for 
Quality People 

REPUBLIC RUBBER CO., of Cal. 

295 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



CLASS A GARAGE, Inc. 

Particular Service to Out of Town Motorists 
"CLUB" Service Our Specialty 

735-751 Post Street San Francisco 

TELEPHONE PROSPECT 2280 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Call on us when you want photographs of any kind. 
We can and will please you. Our new studio, the 
largest west of New York, covers 9,000 square feet of 
floor space, and Is completely equipped for every branch 
of our business. You are cordially invited to call and 
we will be very glad to take you through the different 
departments, portrait, commercial, copying, enlarging. 
Kodak, etc. You will be interested. 

ARTHUR SPAULDING CO., 
Everything in Modern Photography. 

625-633 Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Phonas— Franklin 1184. Homa C 4084. 



MoToRoL ~ 



If you want to prolong the life 
of your engine, 

If you want to eliminate smoke 
and carbon, 

If you want to reduce your oil 

Use MoToRoL 



'It suits because It doesn't soot' 



Hughson & Merton, Inc. 

530 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco. Cal. 



"HOOVER" 

AUXILIARY SPRING & 
SHOCK ABSORBER 



Full factory equipment on all Pack- 
ard*, Oldsmoblles, Coles, Thomas and 
Seven others. Absolutely perfect. 
Full set of four— $14 to $it. Under 
compression by heavy loads, rough 
roads or bumps. Under all conditions 
rides as easy as on aaphalt. Impos- 
sible to break springs. No competition 

HOOVER SPRING CO. 
617 Turk St., San Francisco 



LIGHT YOUR AUTOMOBILE WITH THE 

DYNETO Automatic Electric Lighting System 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

Pacific Com Agents 
637-39-41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco 

CALL AND SEE DEMONSTRATION 



There is nothing in Goodrich Advertising 
that isn't in Goodrich Goods 

Goodrich EL Tires 

Best in the Long Run 

There are forty-three years of experience in 
rubber manufacturing in every Goodrich Tire 

THE B. F. GOODRICH COMPANY 

Everything that's best in Rubber 
341-847 Market Street San Francisco 

Los Angeles Oakland Fresno Sacramento 



VULCANIZING 



PEART & ELKINGTON 

Phone Market 6J70 

42 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PANHARD 
OIL 



FREE FROM CARBON 
L. H. & B. I. BILL, 

843 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



August 1, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




INSWANCfi 




b'Si 



St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Co. 

Growth of the Company in Periods of Ten Years 



The shortages of Samuel H. Gilbert, of Sacramento, ar- 
rested by the National Union for embezzlement, are now esti- 
mated to exceed twelve thousand dollars. Gilbert did a general 
insurance business, and the companies to suffer most are the 
Fireman's Fund, National Union and Pacific Coast Casualty 
Company. He has filed a petition in bankruptcy. 

• * * 

The dual agency of the Fireman's Fund at Seattle has been 
discontinued. Dowden, Gazzam & Arnold retired in favor of 

the Hunter, Mellen Co. 

• * » 

President Bernard Faymonville has been compelled by press 
of business to postpone his visit to Macon, Ga. He will leave 
here September 10th for the purpose of appointing a manager 
for the Southeastern department, and being present at the West- 
ern Union meeting. 

• * * 

At a meeting of the Underwriters' Publicity Committee this 
week, a course of action for Manager Willard Done will be out- 
lined. While his duties will be broadly educational, particu- 
lar attention will be given to legislative matters. 

• • * 

W. H. Raymond, since 1902 special agent for the Liverpool 
& London & Globe in Oregon and Washington, and previously 
a well known field man in the Pacific Northwest, who died last 
Saturday night of Bright's disease, was buried to-day (Wed- 
nesday) at Portland. It is not known who will succeed him. 

• * * 

The Grand Court of California, Foresters of America, has 
filed suit for damages in the sum of $1,000 against the Forest- 
ers' Home Association of California, and at the same time asks 
for a restraining order directing the Foresters' Home Associa- 
tion to cease the use of the name. Besides the Home, the fol- 
lowing named are included as defendants : E. J. Deaver, A. J. 
Mulgrew, J. J. Scannel, F. R. Niedt, Albert Bacon, John Halli- 

day and Howard K. James. 

• • » 

Suits seeking to enjoin the Missouri Superintendent of In- 
surance from revoking the licenses of the Bankers' Life of Des 
Moines and the Woodman Accident Insurance Company of Ne- 
braska, because they refused to pay a 2 per cent tax levied in 
foreign insurance companies doing business in Missouri, were 
filed in the Circuit Court of Jefferson City on July 27th. The 
companies claim that they were assessed on all business not 

affected by the law. 

• • • 

A smoking bomb, this week, beneath the warehouse of Alfred 
Noak, at Oakland, testified to the source of a fire which almost 
consumed the place, and at the same time another alarm came 
from the unoccupied home and stable of August Joaquin, four 
blocks distant. Both are believed to have been set by incen- 
diaries with bombs. 

• • • 

At a recent meeting of the Insurance Brokers' Committee of 
the World's Insurance Congress, Mr. B. F. Brisac was elected 
chairman, and D. A. Spencer was elected secretary. The rest 
of the members are as follows: Wm. H. La Boyteaux, Henry 
S. Manheim, M. Thompson and Edward A. Schmitt, all of San 

Francisco. 

• • * 

The growing business of the Occidental Life, of Los Angeles, 
has compelled the management to seek more commodious quar- 
ters. The home office will henceforth be located in the Mer- 
chants' National Bank Building, nearly all of the twelfth floor 
of that handsome edifice being devoted to the purpose. The 
business of the Occidental has experienced a handsome increase 
this year, and promises to exceed that of last year by a hand- 
some sum. 

• • • 

Mayor Otis, of Alameda, Cal., has devised a plan to protect 
municipal employees by means of the establishment of an in- 
surance fund, and th* City Council will be requested to give it 



in 



[880 
1890, 

1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1918, 
July 1, 1914, 



p i iv ( irganlzed with 176,000.00 I 
1870, Total \ Net Su 

857,81 
1,718,904.60 
" 

6.286,457.78 
7,086,0 
8,032,864.69 
6,786, II 
10.249,327.20 



510.697.88 

f.64. 3(57.71 
1,641,624.42 
!, 046,641.40 
!,349,402.79 

!,963,856.58 



A Useful Company to any Agent 

Writes— Marine Automobile 

Fire Inland Transit Baggage 

Wind Storm Tourists Floaters Travellers Samples 

Lightning Merchandise Floaters Motor Boats 

Hail Packages by Mail Registered Mail 

M. C. HARRISON & CO., General Agents 



Fire and Automobile Insurance 

Ample Facilities for Handling Large Lines 

PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 

W1LL1AMSBURGH CITY FIRE INS. CO. - Organized 1853 

MERCHANTS FIRE ASSURANCE CORPORATION, Organized 1910 
UNITED STATES FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. Organized 1824 
NEW BRUNSWICK FIRE INSURANCE CO. - Organized 1826 

NORTH RIVER INSURANCE CO. - . Organized 1822 

WM. W. ALVERSON, Manager 

374 Pine Street, San Francisco, California 

SPECIAL AGENTS 



R. R. ROPER, San Francisco 
T. J. KELEHER, Lot Angeles 



A. M. LOVELACE, Portland 
W. T. BOOTH, Spokane 



1863 



1914 



FIFTY-FIRST ANNIVERSARY 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Capital $1,500,000 Assets, $10,000,000 

FIRE MARINE AUTOMOBILE 

California and Sansome Streets, San Francisco, California. 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA 

(Best In the West) 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams. Elevator, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobile, Burglary, Plate Glass. Accident and Health 
Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

T. L. Millar. President; L. B. Hoge, General Manager Accident an 
Health Department. 

Head Office— Merchants" Exchange Building. San Francisco 

The Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

CHARTERED 1850 



PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

The Insurance Exchange, San Francisco 

Benjamin J. Smith, Manager Guy Francis, Asst. Manager 

The West Coast Life Ins. Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL, 

A Strang, well managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit, and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent or write the company for sample of policy forma 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 1, 1914. 



consideration. The only municipal employees now insured are 
those in the electrical department, and it costs the city about 
$2,200 per year to have this insurance carried in the State 
insurance fund. By having the city set aside $5,000 annually 
as an insurance fund, Mayor Otis believes he can save the 

money for his burg. 

* • • 

A determined effort is being made by Fire Chief Murphy, 
backed by the San Francisco Board of Public Works to rid the 
city of the last of the cheap frame buildings erected immedi- 
ately following the conflagration of 1906, and suffered in many 

instances to remain, contrary to law. 

* * * 

The annual statement of the Pacific Automobile Indemnity 
Exchange, of Los Angeles, shows a net surplus of $864. Of the 
$34,483 of assets claimed, $15,812 consists of outstanding ac- 
counts. 

* * * 

Volney Seabeck, of Portland, recently appointed special 
agent in the Pacific Northwest of the New Zealand Fire, to suc- 
ceed the late C. W. Hawxhurst, was connected for a number of 
years with .he Equitable Rating Bureau of Oregon. He will 
cover Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Eastern Ore- 
gon, with headquarters at Spokane, Wash. 

* • • 

G. A. R. Huer, who some time ago resigned as special agent 
for the Aetna Fire in its Pacific Coast department, has become 
an independent adjuster of fire losses, and established head- 
quarters at San Francisco. 

* » * 

President Darwin P. Kingsley, of the New York Life Insur- 
ance Co., has sent a letter to all insurance executives transmit- 
ting an opinion by the Hon. John C. Spooner as to the proper 
amendment to the Federal Constitution so as to bring the busi- 
ness of insurance under Federal supervision and relieve it from 
the multiplicity of State supervision. 



Your Stationery should bear the stamp of QUALITY 
Let us guide you in your selections 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Importers of and Dealers in 
The Highest Class P/\ P Q R For Office Stationery 



Battery and Jackson Streets 



San Francisco, Cal. 



A. W. BEST 



ALICE BEST 



BEST'S ART SCHOOL 



1625 CALIFORNIA STREET 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 

Sketching 

Painting 



ENDORSE SHORTR1DGE FOR SENATOR. 

The Jewish Times of San Francisco and the Mining, Oil and 
Engineering Review, warmly endorse Samuel M. Shortridge for 
United States Senator. The Review says: "Mr. Shortridge is 
already a national figure. For many years he has fought the 
battles of the Republican party, to which, in early life, he 
pledged his allegiance. That party has a chance now to cover 
itself with glory and to honor the entire people of the State, 
the miner, the farmer, the man of commerce and the toiler, by 
nominating for United States Senator the gifted orator, the able 
lawyer, the man with a giant brain and a human sympathy for 
his fellow men, Samuel M. Shortridge." 



Three cheers for the camp meeting of the Methodist 

Episcopal district of Chicago and its resolve to attend strictly 
to its own business : "We are going to make this meeting unique 
and memorable," said the Rev. John Thompson in one of the 
opening addresses, "by not discussing women's dress nor the 
tango. Old-fashioned religion is the subject of this meeting, 
and trivial, ephemeral matters will not be considered." 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

SAN FRANCISCO INSTITUTE OF ART 

Formerly Mark Hopkins Institute 



PAINTING 
DRAWING 
DECORATIVE 
DESIGNING 




MODELING 
ILLUSTRATING 
TEACHERS' 
COURSE 



DAY, NIGHT and SATURDAY CLASSES School Opens Aujust 10th 

Circulars mailed on application io the S. F. Institute of Art. Ran Francisco 



H 



Y 



ITCHCOCK 
MILITARY 

ACADEM 

SAN RAFAEL, CAL. 

Summer Camp Now Open 

For Information Write to Principals. 

REX W. SHERER and 
S. J. HALLEY 



MISS HAMLIN'S SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 



2230 PACIFIC AVENUE 

2117 1 

21231 



BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Semester begins Monday, August 24, 1914. Board- 
ing and Day Pupils. 

"Accredited" by all accrediting institutions, both in 
California and in Eastern States. 

The aim of the school is to train a pupil in the best 
use of her faculties, to develop her character, and to 
maintain a high scholarship. Telephone West 5461 



The Beringer Conservatory of Music 

926 Pierce Street near McAllister Street 

PHONE WEST 7893 SAN FRANCISCO 

Directors: Joseph Beringer (Concert Pianist) 
Mme. Jos. Beringer (Concert Contralto) 

Thorough education in Pianoforte Playing and Singing. 
Special departments for beginners, amateurs and 
professionals. Pupils prepared for the operatic and 
concert stage. Opportunities given to advanced piano 
and vocal students to join the well known Beringer 
Musical Club for public appearances. 



Miss Harker's School California 

Boarding and Day School for Girls. Certificate admits 
to Stanford, University of California, Vassar, Smith 
and Mills. Intermediate and primary departments. 
Great attention given to Music, Arts and Crafts. Home 
Economics. Special nurse for younger children. 
Ninth year. Catalogue upon application. 



MANZANITA HALL 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 

Makes a specialty of preparing boys and young men forentrance 
to the universities. The location, adjacent to Stanford Univer- 
sity and to Palo Alto, a town of remarkable culture, makes 
possible a school life of unusual advantages and opportunities. 
The next semester begins August 25, 1914. For catalogue 
and specific information, address 

W. A. SHEDD, Head Master 




(Mtfnniia A&n?rtta?r 



PRICE 10 CENTS SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 1914 $4.00 PER YEA 






CHRISTOFFERSON LEAVING THE HANGAR ON SAN FRANCISCO BEACH, NEAR 
THE CLIFF HOUSE CARRYING A PASSENGER 

Christofferson states that engine failures in high altitudes 
on account of gasoline has been solved by using 

ASSOCIATED GASOLINE 



L. & S- CEMENT PAINT 

FIRE RETARDENT ACID PROOF WATER PROOF 

Adheres to any surface. Secures re- 
duction in insurance rate. An ideal 
protection for wood, black or galvan- 
ized iron, concrete or brick. Made in 
any color. 

Manufactured by 

PAINT PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

LAIRD & SINCLAIR, 

DISTRIBUTORS 
Telephone Sutter 1967 Sharon Building, San Francisco 




THE WRONG GLASSES 

WILL RUIN THE STRONGEST EYES 

MAYERLE'S GLASSES 



Are highly recommended for reading, working or to 
see at a distance and to relieve muscular eye strain, 
weak eyes, poor sight, tired, itchy, watery, inflamed, 
gluey eyes, floating spots, crusty or granulated eyelids, crossed eyes, astig- 
matism, headaches, children's eyes and complicated cases of eye defects. Two 
gold medals and diploma of honor awarded at California Industiy Exposition 
also at Mechanics' Fair, October 191S, to 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

Graduate German Expert Optician; Established 20 Years. 
Opposite Empress Theater. San Francisco. 



9G0 Market Street. 



Mayerle's Eyewater, at Druggists, 50c; by Mail, 65c. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

INVALID CHAIRS. 

exchanged; manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 



Sold, rented. 
Market street, near Octavia, 



Telephone Park 2940. 



DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgeon of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 

Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Dr. R. T. Leaner, Surgeon Chiropodist, formerly of 6 Geary street; 
removes corns entirely whole — painless — without knife. Bunions and in- 
growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 212-214 West- 
bank Bldg.. 830 Market St. Tel. Kearny 3578. 

NOTARY PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronoohn, Notary Public and Pension Attorney. All legal 
papers drawn up accurately. 217 Montgomery St., above Buen. San Fran- 
<~tnco. Cal. Phon*> Ooujrlan tnl 



NEW PARISIAN FRENCH LAUNDRY 

Mme. C. La FON 

First Class Work at Reasonable Prices 

Laces and Lace Curtains a Specialty 

Club, Restaurant and Hotel Service 

991 OAK STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone Park 4962 



PILLSBURY'S PICTURES, inc 
VIEWS OF CALIFORNIA 

KODAK finishing done by EXPERTS. We will send 
for your films. 

219 POWELL STREET Phone Kearny 3841 



BRUSHES 



623 Sacramento Street, between 
Kearny and Montgomery Streets 



With full line of Brushes. BroomB and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. Metal 

Polish and Cleaning: Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787 

WM. BUCHANAN 



White Diamond Water Company, Inc. 

Pure Water for Oakland, Alameda, Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically treated 
butbaclenologically purifier! by electrical process. f> gallons DELIVERED 
FEESH EACH WEEK, $1.60 per month. Single 5 gallon bottle. 10 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 86792 
5736 Telegraph Ave., opp. Idora Park Oakland, Cal. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



BANK OF 
NEW SOUTH WALES 



(ESTABLISHED 1811) 



Paid-up Capital 
Reserve Fund 
Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 

Aggregate Assets 30th 
September, 1913 




- $17,500,000 

11,750,000 

- 17,500,000 

- $46.750,000 
$236,841,080.26 



J. RUSSELL FRENCH, General Manager 



:;:■.!■, BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australia States, New Zealand; 
Fiji, Papua (New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every 
description of Australian Banking Business. Wool and Produce Credits 
Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 



£■ 




ANGLO & LONDON 

PARIS NATIONAL 

BANK 



SAN FRANCISCO 


Paid-Up Capital 


ji.oro.roo 


Surplus find Undivided Profits 9l.fl00.000 


Tulal Resources 


140,000,000 


OFFICERS: 


RERHERT FLBtSHB ACKER President 


SIG GrtEENEBAUM Cha 


rmnnof llie Board 


Washington dodge 


Vice-Prtiniilent 


JOS. FR II- BLANDER 


Vloe-F resident 


C, F HUNT 


Vice-President 


K ALTSCHUL 


Cashier 


C B i'ARKER 


ABiIitsnt Ckfhler 


\\M 11 HIGH 


isslftaot Cashier 


H CHOYNSKI 


Assistant Cashier 


0, R HURDICK 


a 1 unt Rubier 


A. L. UN0ERMAN 


Soen lar| 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

ESTABLISHED 1867 
Paid-up Capital $15,000,000 

Reserve Fund 13,500,000 

Aggregate Resource 260,000.000 

TRAVELLERS' CHEQUES 



MAD OFFICE. TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER C.V.O..LL.D..D.C.L. 

President 

ALEXANDER LAIRD General Manager 

JOHN AIRD Assistant General Manager 



The new Travellers' Cheques recently Issued by this Bank are a most 
convenient way in which to carry money when traveling. They are is- 
sued in denominations of 



$10 



$20 



$50 



AND 



$100 



and the exact amount payable in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France. 
Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Italy, Norway, Russia, Sweden and 
Switzerland Is stated on the face of each cheque, while in other coun- 
tries they are payable at current rates. 

The cheques and all information regarding them may be obtained at 
every office of the bank. BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager. 

450 California Street, corner Leldesdorff 



The German Savings & Loan Society 

Savings (The German Bank) Commercial 

Incorporated 1868 
526 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Member of tfae Associated Saviors Banks af San Francisco 
The Following Branches for RECEIPT AND PAYMENT OF DEPOSITS ONLY: 

MISSION BRANCH S. E. Corner Mission and 21st Streets 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH S. W. Cor, Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH S. W, Cor, Haight and Belvedere 

JUNE 30th, 1914 

Assets $ 58,656,635.13 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,857,717.65 

Employees' Pension Fund 177,868.71 

Number of Depositors 66,367 

OFFICE HOURS: lOodock A.M. lo 3o'clock P. M.. except Salurdays to 12 o'clock M. and 
Saturday evenings from 6 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits only 
For the 6 months endingjune 30th, 1914, a 
dividend to depositors of 4% per annum was declared. 



Telephone Kearny U6i Private Exchange Connecting All Warehouses 

SAN FRANCISCO WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehousemen Forwarding Agents Distributors Public Weighers 

Spur Track Connections With All Railroads 

Main Office: 625-647 Third Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




THIS IS OUR MOST CIVILIZED AGE 



"Of the People, By the People, For the 
People" 

SAMUEL M. 

SHORTRIDGE 

Now Before the People of California for the 

Republican Nomination 

AT THE DIRECT PRIMARY 

ELECTION, AUGUST 25, 1914 

For thirty years he has supported the Repub- 
lican party, and for the first time asks the 
Republican party to support him. 

He stands for protection for every 
legitimate business and enterprise. 

Progress along safe and just lines, pros- 
perity for all. 

FOR 

United States Senator 



Brockway Hot Springs 

LAKE TAHOE 

New hotel just completed. New 
swimming pool. Electric lights. 
Cottages with private baths of 
natural hot water. 

LAWRENCE & COMSTOCK 



PROPRIETORS AND MANAGERS 



BROCKWAY, CAL. 



ALP 



TAM - rtL-|~ - AIS 

CALIFORNIA vs. SWITZERLAND 

WE HAVE THE ALPS RIGHT HERE 

Mt. Tamalpais and Muir Woods 



The Recreation 

and Play Grounds 

of San Francisco 



FARE 
EITHER TRIP 

$1.90 



Via Sausallto Ferry 

Foot of 

Market Street 



Rendezvous of Automobilists 
HOTEL OCCIDENTAL 

SANTA ROSA 

Rates, European Plan, $1.00 per day and up. 

Garage in Connection 



LAKE TAHOE 

Fishing, Boating, Out-of-door 

Recreation, Hotels, Cottages, 

Casinos, Dancing. 

WEEK END EXCURSIONS 



From San Francisco, <fc 
Oakland, Berkeley 
and Alameda 



10 



.65 

Round Trip 



Includes 75-mile steamer trip around lake, 
calling at all resorts. 

Leave San Francisco, Ferry Station, 7:00 P. M. 
Oakland, 16th Street Station, 7:38 P. M. 

Through Pullman Sleeping Car 
to Truck.ee 

Southern Pacific 

The Exposition Line — 1915 — First in Safety 



YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK 

Reduced Rate During August 
1 and l /s Fare, Round Trip to the Valley 

i in.- i- an exceptionally line season for Yosemite. 
There is now plenty of room in the ramps, and also 
an abundance of private camping equipment. Aug- 
ust will be an enjoyable month in the Valley, 
tramping in trails and heights, or loitering by Its 
9tri uns and waterfalls. 

AUTOMOBILE SERVICE IN THE PARK 

The new auto stages carry the visitor between the 
railroad and YoBemite thJB season, one of the finest 
auto trips in the world, without extra cost. 

ASK FOR YOSEMITE OUTING FOLDER 

For full Information about trip, see your home 
™^ ticket apreut. or address 

YOSEMITE VALLEY RAILROAD COMPANY 
G. F. MILLER, General Agent 0. W. LEHMER 

212 W. 7th and 334 So. Spring General Manager 

Los Angeles, Cal. Merced, Cal. 





Fast Electric Trains 



TO 



Sacramento 



The Wonder Trip 

Entire line equipped with Automatic Block Signals. 
Observation cars operated. Safe — Quick. 

Oakland Antioch & Eastern Railway 

San Francisco Depot — Key Route Ferry 
Phone Sutter 2389 








)TBR 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




Vol. LXXXVIII 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, August 8, 1914 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 21 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3691. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-offlce as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — S. L. Carman, representative, 156 Fifth Ave. 

Chicago Office — Geo. Hische, 1310 Westminster, Westminster Building, 
Chicago. 

London Office — George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhlll. E. C, England. 

Matter Intended for publication in the current number of the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER should 

be sent to the office not later than 5 p. m. Wednesday. 

Subscription Hates (including postage) — 1 year, $4.00; 6 months, J2.26. 
Foreign — 1 year, J6.00; 6 months, J3.26. 



The dove of peace will now take a vacation. 

It is the season of patriotic music — all sorts. 

"The desert queen" has sued the "pajama man" for 

divorce. Shucks ! 



The Gridley rice show will cover seven acres. 

one of California's infant industries. 



This is 



The stork visited the planet Jupiter, which has developed 

a baby moon, and is suspected of twins. 

The surgeons propose to cure William Keats Hamilton 

of the bigamy habit by cutting out a piece of his brain. 

Dr. Jordan loudly declared that war was impossible be- 
cause of the cost, and he proved it by arithmetic, but the sum 
does not seem to work out in practice. 

Editor Miller, of the Red Bluff News, declares as the re- 
sult of personal inspection, that he found Mt. Lassen to be a 
fraud as a volcano. Volcanoes have no friends. 

Rev. Father McGinty, of San Mateo, speaking from the 

pulpit to his congregation, quoted Cardinal Gibbons' statement 
that "prohibition would make the American people a race of 
hypocrites." 

"Teachers are a funny bunch," said Professor Rugh, of 

the University of California, addressing the Berkeley teachers' 
institute. The learned professor's language smacks of the 
sporting page. 

Harold Bell Wright, the novelist, is reported to have 

fled from his ranch home in the Imperial Valley into the San 
Diego mountains to escape the importunities of friends who 
want him to run for Congress. 

Superintendent Shebblee of the State fish hatchery, re- 
ports that thirty-four million, one hundred and forty-two fish 
eggs have been hatched to date in 1914, at the California 
hatcheries. Who counted them? 

Evading the Wisconsin eugenic law and saving the price 

of a honeymoon, Albert F. Steinkraus, of Milwaukee, and 
Edna I. Seymour, of Green Bay, have signed the first marriage 
contract ever drawn up in Milwaukee county. 



The women's campaign against the Eight Hour Bill has 

been launched by Mrs. Emily Hoppin, for forty years a farmer 
in California, who is a director of the Farmers' Protective 
League. Mrs. Hoppin will appoint an advisory committee of 
prominent women, and a systematic campaign against the pro- 
posed measure will be carried on all over California. 

It's an ill wind, etc. The European war will at least 

keep a lot of good American money at home, and next year, in- 
stead of going to Europe, the millions annually spent by 
American tourists will come to San Francisco to see the Ex- 
position. We shall lose some European visitors, but we never 
did expect much from that source. That amiable counsel of 
perfection, "See America first," will be followed on compul- 
sion. 

Reform by means of the municipal swimming hole got 

its first start in Oakdale, Stanislaus County, and already it has 
spread as far as Madera, where Probation Officer Williams is 
anxious to secure facts regarding the cost of the pool and the 
cost of its operation, and suggests that if the small interior 
towns can provide bathing places for its boys, the boy ques- 
tion will be eliminated, and there will be no further need for 
probation officers. 

Louis P. Olker, of Chico, running for district attorney of 

Butte County, has invoked the aid of the movies to boost his 
candidacy. Olker has purchased the part of the Trolley League 
motion picture film that portrayed himself making a bow and 
smiling his sweetest to the camera man. It is an excellent 
likeness, and the film shows the candidate just as he is in real 
life, without any elimination of character or expression by an 
over-zealous photographer. 

The State Board of Health reports that the weaving of 

a rag rug in the home of Mrs. S. V. Morrison in Femdale, 
Humboldt county, has started a smallpox epidemic of such 
magnitude that Dr. Howard, assistant secretary of the State 
Board of Health, was dispatched yesterday to Humboldt county 
to take charge of the situation. Some of the rags intended 
for carpet were infected with smallpox and so the disease 
spread until practically every person in Ferndale had been 
exposed. 

Among other things it will be necessary to increase the 

number of voting precints in the State from 4,453 to 8,000 
according to Secretary of State Jordan. "This will have to be 
done or else the election officers will be using the ballots for 
blankets," said Jordan in discussing the matter. He will 
notify the supervisors the ballots will be so voluminous that it 
will be beyond human endurance for the election officials to 
count them "without interruption," as required by the constitu- 
tion, unless the number of polling places is more than doubled. 
A relay system in counting will be provided. 




E/DITORJAlv CO 



Greatest War in 
World's History. 



Virtually speaking, all Europe at 
this writing is plunged in war. The 
nations that have not actually de- 
clared war are hastily mobilizing 
their armies and navies. Big and little, they are all involved 
or on the way to be. Some jockeying there is among the diplo- 
mats, with a view to shifting the blame for the war, which is 
certain to be the most destructive and murderous in the his- 
tory of the world. Austria of course gave the first provocation 
by sending a humiliating ultimatum to Servia. The war might 
have been localized between those two powers had not Russia 
interfered on behalf of Servia. This action forced the hand 
of Germany, and as a necessary result of German interven- 
tion, France was compelled to act in self-defense. The first 
serious act of war was the seizure of the little Duchy of Lux- 
embourg by German troops in defiance of the treaty guaran- 
teeing the neutrality of that principality. As Luxembourg is 
the key to France, that country was compelled to act in self- 
defense. 

Germany will be compelled to meet a double attack from 
front and rear on the part of France and Russia. Austria must 
take care of Servia and give such help as can be spared to the 
defense of Germany. Italy desires to remain neutral, notwith- 
standing its treaty pledge to back the triple alliance. 

Belgium and Holland, threatened with annexation by one or 
other of the powers, are mobilizing their troops to protect 
themselves. Those countries may easily become the scene of 
the most important battles of the war. 

In the meantime, the money markets of the world are de- 
moralized, and specie payments are being suspended in many 
quarters. Everywhere the stock exchanges are closed in order 
to give the panic time to subside. 

England's position at first was diplomatic and designed, if 
possible, to preserve neutrality except in certain contingencies 
stated by Sir Edward Grey, minister of foreign affairs. One 
of those contingencies was the invasion of Belgium by the Ger- 
mans, and that having taken place, Great Britain has finally de- 
clared war on Germany. England's original position was 
stated in the House of Commons by Sir Edward Gray as 
follows : 

"The French fleet is in the Mediterranean and the northern 
coasts of France are defenseless. If a foreign fleet engaged in 
war against France should come down and battle against those 
defenseless coasts, we could not stand aside. We felt strongly 
that France was entitled to know at once whether, in the event 
of an attack on her unprotected coasts, she could rely on our 
support. I gave the information to the French ambassador last 
night that if the German fleet goes into the English Channel, 
or into the North Sea, to attack French shipping or the French 
coast, the British fleet will give all the protection in its power. 
That answer is subject to the approval of Parliament. It is not 
a declaration of war." 

Another contingency in which Great Britain would certainly 
intervene is the invasion of Belgium by German forces. On 
that point, Sir Edward said: 

"When mobilization began I telegraphed to both the French 
and the German governments asking whether they would re- 
spect Belgium neutrality. France replied that she was pre- 
pared to do so unless another power violated that neutrality. 
The German foreign secretary replied that he could not possi- 
bly give a response before consulting the imperial chancellor 
and the German emperor. He intimated that he doubted whe- 
ther it was possible to give an answer, because that answer 








would disclose German plans. We were sounded last week as 
to whether, if Belgian neutrality were restored after the war, it 
would pacify us, and we replied that we could not barter our 
interests or our obligations." 

These utterances seem to make it certain that sooner or later, 
in one way or another, England will be involved in the war. 

In the meantime, thousands of American tourists are ma- 
rooned in Europe, and owing to the paralysis of money markets 
are unable to cash their letters of credit. The President has 
asked Congress to make a special appropriation for their re- 
lief. 

The embarrassment of business in this country due to the 
war will be merely temporary. One result of the trouble has 
been that we have bought back at greatly reduced prices mil- 
lions of dollars worth of American securities. Another result 
must be that this country will be called on for vast quantities 
of supplies to feed and equip the armies in the field. 

XT 

A report written by Moorfield 
Administration of Storey, Louis Brandeis and other 

Justice in California. eminent lawyers for the National 
Economic League, deals with the 
causes and remedies for the prevailing inefficiency in the en- 
forcement of law and the administration of justice. Dealing 
with the local causes that make for inefficiency in the adminis- 
tration of justice, the report finds that one cause is diversity of 
interests in different parts of the same State which lead to laws 
imposed by one section on another and to resistance of their 
enforcement by the latter. A second is the close contact of 
criminal law and its enforcement with politics. To some ex- 
tent this operates everywhere. There is little danger of politi- 
cal oppression through civil litigation. There is constant fear 
of political oppression through the criminal law. Not only is 
one class suspicious of attempts by another to force its ideas 
on the community under penalty of prosecution, but the power 
of a majority to visit with punishment practices which an ac- 
tive minority consider in no wise objectionable is liable to 
abuse and whether rightly or wrongly used puts a strain upon 
criminal law and administration. Besides the close relation of 
administration of the criminal law to politics permits public 
prosecutors when the pubic conscience is active to be spectacu- 
lar at the expense of efficiency, and when it is sluggish to be 
lax for fear of offending interests. These are doubtless to 
some extent inherent difficulties in the administration of puni- 
tive justice growing out of the inevitable relation between en- 
forcement of the criminal law and politics. There is much evi- 
dence, however, that the influence of politics upon the enforce- 
ment of the law by public prosecutors often goes much beyond 
the inevitable minimum. The same considerations that call 
for civil service with respect to administrative officers apply 
also to the staff of our prosecuting officers in large cities where 
a considerable number of subordinates is required. 

Many of the stock complaints with reference to the adminis- 
tration of criminal justice in the United States grow out of re- 
sults of this connection between the enforcement of the criminal 
law and politics. Pressure is put upon elective prosecutors to 
make a record of convictions. 

With regard to the first of these causes, let us suppose that 
the voters residing south of Tehachapi should prove strong 
enough to impose a prohibition law on all California. Would 
that law be obeyed in Northern or Central California? 

With the politics of the public prosecutor's office we are 
even more familiar in San Francisco. 



Aucust 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



The Truth About 
Spring Valley. 



The people of San Francisco are 
now in a way to learn the truth 
about the Spring Valley Water 
Works and their value. The posi- 
tive value of the plant to the company is one thing; the value 
of the installation to the water consumers of San Francisco is 
quite another and a different affair. As a matter of fact, the 
only part of the Spring Valley plant that the public needs or 
ought to buy is the distributing system within the city limits. 
With that acquired and the Hetch Hetchy project completed, 
the city would be in every way much better supplied, and 
Spring Valley would be no worse off. 

Of course, if Spring Valley could sell its property to the 
city at the greatly inflated valuation now proposed, why, that 
would be a great thing for the corporation, while the result 
would be disastrous to San Francisco. That is to say, we would 
pay a greatly excessive price for an inadequate plant, and 
would at the same time indefinitely postpone the installation 
of water supply from the Sierra. 

The city does not need the reservoir system of the Spring 
Valley system on the peninsula, and the peninsula does very 
badly need that system. In fact, the slow growth of popula- 
tion in San Mateo County is due mostly to the scarcity of water 
supply. San Francisco and San Mateo would be greatly helped 
by the installation of a Sierra water supply, while at the same 
time the peninsula towns could get their much needed supply 
from the Spring Valley reservoirs. 

San Francisco, as we have said, is in a way to learn the 
truth without sophistication. Neither party to the proposed 
purchase of the Spring Valley plant — neither the municipal 
administration nor the company — is spending any money to 
influence publicity, and the result is that the daily press is be- 
ginning to set forth the facts without bias. 

SB- 



California THE 
Largest Producer 



Although California is the largest 
producer of quicksilver, the output 
of this metal in the United States 
does not increase, and the produc- 
tion for last year was the lowest since 1860, with the exception 
of 1908. Final figures compiled by the United States Geologi- 
cal Survey from every producing district give a domestic out- 
put of quicksilver for 1913 of 20,213 flasks of 75 pounds each, 
valued at $813,171, against a production of 25,064 flasks, valued 
at $1,053,941, in 1912. The decline was due partly to the large 
foreign output for the last few years, a dull market, and a gen- 
eral lowering of prices. Producers report 154,033 short tons of 
ore mined and available for treatment in 1913, against 166,564 
tons in 1912, and the reduction of 136,278 tons, against 155,693 
tons in 1912. 

California, as usual, was the largest producer in 1913, with 
15,591 flasks, valued at $627,228, a decrease from the output of 
1912 of 4,933 flasks in quantity and of $235,806 in value. The 
total value of the production of quicksilver in the State from 
1850, the date of the earliest output, to the end of 1913, has 
been $95,902,923. The quicksilver output of Nevada in 1913 
was 1,645 flasks, valued at $66,178. 

Quicksilver is used mainly for the manufacture of fulminate 
for explosive caps, electric appliances, drugs and scientific ap- 
paratus and for the recovery of gold and silver by amalgama- 
tion. The use in gold and silvery recovery was formerly ex- 
tensive, but the rapid increase in the cyanidation of gold and 
silver ores has materially decreased the recovery by amalga- 
mation. This is, of course, due in part to the change in depth 
from free milling to unoxidized ores, but more largely to the 
successful treatment of certain large supplies of orW never 



profitable by amalgamation at any depth and to increased 
economies and profits by the substitution of cyanidation for 
amalgamation. The most important producer of quicksilver in 
the United States is the famous New Almaden mine, of Santa 
Clara County, which contains over 100 miles of underground 
workings and which has produced steadily since 1850. 

»• 

John Trask, who heads the de- 
Mr. Trask's Trying Task, partment of the Panama-Pacific 

Exposition for the selection of 
art exhibits, in reply to questions put in New York and other 
centers, explains the system of selection. In the way of gen- 
eral information on this subject, it may be stated that the 
United States section of this department, which will occupy 
approximately half of its entire exhibit space, is under the 
direct management of the department itself.- Herein, too, the 
exhibition will be, in the main, contemporaneous. In order, 
however, that the popular error of supposing that the American 
artist of to-day is without ancestry or tradition may be refuted, 
there will be a chronological historical showing of American 
painting and sculpture covering the period from Colonial and 
Revolutionary times down to the years just preceding our own. 
As this line of descent in this country has been swayed now 
to the right and now to the left by the influence of foreign 
schools and as the foreign sections in this Exposition will be 
of to-day, there will be a loan collection of foreign works (not 
contemporaneous) arranged by schools, which will make clear 
what their influence has been upon the fine arts in America and 
at the same time serve as a sort of index to the vast wealth of 
our public and private collections. 

The explanation of the plan of selection for the American 
art exhibit, Mr. Trask writes that "the jury system for making 
up an art exhibition without invitations for certain important 
works is a perfectly lovely system, but, like the famous plan 
for making hens lay twins, it will not work. 

"This department, then, proposes to invite, whenever and 
wherever it can find them, such works as in its best judgment 
will help to make such a showing as will command for the 
American artists the respect and admiration of the world. The 
final decision to extend such invitation must, in each case, rest 
with some one, and that some one happens to be the subscriber. 
The task is not altogether a joy. Its performance will, at 
best, arouse some criticism, but it is a necessary part of the 
undertaken work. If the critics as they arise will approach 
their criticism with as open and unprejudiced a mind as does 
this department approach the duty of invitation, there will be 
with criticism some sympathy and of venom none at all. 

"I have said that the department would invite such works 
'as in its best judgment' ought to be invited. Please under- 
stand this 'best judgment' is not a home made product of per- 
sonal bias nor of individual cerebration. To assist it in its 
work, the department has the valued and active service of 
seven advisory committees, numbering in all something over 
one hundred professional artists. Upon these committees the 
department depends for many, in fact for most of its judg- 
ments." 

Mr. Trask and his assistants have the most thankless job 
connected with the world's fair. Artists are an irritable race, 
and Mr. Trask need not expect to come through his work with- 
out a plentiful scorching from the artistic temperament. 

Dr. Mary Schenck Woolman. professor of domestic sci- 
ence, lecturing at the University of California summer school, 
told her class that she had no use for the bread that mother 
used to make. She distinctly condemned home-made bread. 



THE CANDID FRIEND 

Class War of Labor and Capital in San Francisco and Elsewhere — A Barren Appeal to 

the Constitution — Laws Administered b;> Magistrates with an eye on the Polls 

— Practical Suspension of the Constitution— The Politicians Stand By 

BY EDWARD F. CAHILL 



One observes in the public prints a solemn and pretentious 
ippeal to the constitution and the bill of rights made by one 
George W. Alger as part of the "exclusive service of the Sur- 
vey press bureau." Mr. Alger's appeal is made on behalf of 
those injured innocents who promote the cause and policies of 
organized labor with dynamite and brass knuckles, and he 
says: 

"Our constitutions, both State and National, of course, 
guarantee to every one freedom of speech, the right of as- 
sembly, the right to the writ of habeas corpus, freedom 
of the press, and the like, all of which are ancient liberties 
of the English people, considered by our forefathers abso- 
lutely essential to an American democracy. In all the re- 
cent industrial disturbances, including those in Lawrence, 
in West Virginia, in Patterson, in Colorado, things have 
been done which, as given in the press at the time, would 
indicate that the bill of rights, which includes all these 
constitutional liberties to which I have referred, was not 
considered 'practical.' No conservative public opinion has 
as yet been aroused, since these violations (if they have 
been such) of the bill of rights have applied only to dis- 
contented poor people in the course of industrial disturb- 
ances. * * * It is true conservatism to regard the bill of 
rights as something fundamental, as belonging to all of us, 
which cannot exist at all if it is denied to one class and 
preserved only to a more prosperous class which eco- 
nomically needs it least. There are many of us who have 
no sympathy whatever with the class of agitators who are 
to-day shouting for free speech, believing them to be insin- 
cere and lawless in their purposes. The mere fact that we 
do not sympathize with them is no reason why we should 
permit any of the fundamental guarantees of citizenship 
in America to be undermined or destroyed." 

Blind to the Facts. 

All this amuses. It is so superficial, so conventional and so 
frankly blind to the facts. If the writer wants facts and not 
theory, he will do well to read a pamphlet recently printed in 
this city relating the history of the printing pressmen's strike 
under the title of "Organized Felony." I quote : 

"As in past strikes, the pressmen and feeders immedi- 
ately instituted a reign of terror as applied to the business 
in which they had been engaged. As in the past, they 
employed the weapons of intimidation, assault and at- 
tempted assassination — the only weapons with which they 
could hope to enforce the grant of unreasonable demands. 
As in the past, they sought and obtained the passive sym- 
pathy of the municipal administration, which failed in its 
legal obligation to prevent or punish a long series of 
crimes. As in the past, their publicity bureau caused to be 
published in the factional organs an unbroken string of 
false news and baseless comment. As in the past, they 
used their power to prevent the newspapers of general cir- 
culation from publishing accounts of their crime, or, at 
least, in proportion to the importance of the news." 
o- tt S 
Roll of Murderous Assaults. 

The pamphlet proceeds to give a long list of murderous as- 
saults committed by the strikers, with names, dates and nature 
of the injuries. The showing concludes : 

"Arrests have been made in many instances ; but in only 
one case has a jail sentence been imposed. The guilty 
strikers have usually been given very nominal fines, not 
exceeding ten dollars, or have been allowed to go on their 



own recognizance by the police judges. Several non-union 
workmen have been arrested because they presumed to de- 
fend themselves; and in the few instances where they have 
been found guilty they have been fined in some cases as 
much as $50 by the same police judges." 

"5 S ~S 

Professor Tommy Rot. 

The other day in Berkeley, Professor Thomas H. Reed, of 
the university faculty, addressing the American Political Sci- 
ence Association, said: 

"Genuine respect for our courts lies at the basis of civili- 
zation in our country. Two main criticisms have been made 
of our courts: First, they have a bias toward wealth; second, 
they are slow and inefficient. They show their bias toward 
wealth in the narrow and technical spirit in which they inter- 
pret the constitution and hold laws for the correction of social 
and economic abuses to be null and void. They are most in- 
efficient in the trial of ordinary cases where delays have the 
effect of denying justice." 

Tommy Reed, tommy rot! The bias of the courts is all the 
other way here. 

I J 5 

// is a Bad Rule. 

It is a bad constitution that only works one way. It is a 
worse constitution that works neither way. Mr. Alger and 
other sentimentalists and theorists complain that the constitu- 
tion is violated in Colorado and in New Jersey and in the Cali- 
fornia hop fields. On the other hand, the employing printers 
complain that in San Francisco the constitution is suspended 
by magistrates afraid of the labor vote. 

I am not here concerned to take the part of either side in 
this controversy, and my single purpose is to point out that 
appeals to law and the constitution are merely silly as they re- 
late to a conflict of this mortal bitterness. The theorists and 
closet philosophers do not realize that a state of war exists, 
and both sides have suspended the constitution for their own 
purposes. Inter arma silent leges. The constitution as it may 
be held to apply to labor disputes is what the late George C. 
Gorham called "a damned barren ideality." 



/jdft j@£* 



f( HUMBERT]} 

M JEREZ. SPAIN. J 

^ SHERRY '■' 



FOR QUALITY, THE BEST 

In Bulk and Cases 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



ItiNTs Pacific Coabt 



314 SACRAMENTO ST.. S. r. 



August 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



The Labor Point of View. 

Let us get at the point of view. I take it that Clarence Dar- 
row may be regarded as an enlightened exponent of. the point of 
view of organized labor in this conflict. In a recent letter Mr. 
Darrow expounded for publication the sense in which labor 
regards the dynamite explosion that destroyed the lives of 
twenty-two innocent persons in the Los Angeles Times build- 
ing. Of that savage crime, Mr. Darrow wrote : 

"Some time the world will understand. Some time it 
will know that this sad tragedy was but an incident in the 
everlasting conflict between those who have and those who 
want, and that no individual was really responsible for the 
act. Of course, it cannot be expected that many men 
could view with either justice or mercy the act of a man 
who, without chance of personal reward, faced prison and 
death through his devotion to a cause." 

8-8-5 

Regarded as an Act of War. 

That is to say, Mr. Darrow explains that it was an act of 
war inspired by what he describes as an almost religious sen- 
timent. As a matter of fact, a state of war exists in which one 
side uses dynamite, and the other side, as in Colorado, replies 
with machine guns and bayonets. It is a class war of the 
most savage and brutal character. For the present, it is spo- 
radic in manifestation, but it is only a question of time when 
its ferocity and extent must equal that of the somewhat simi- 
lar class war which has devastated Mexico for three years. In 
class wars quarter is neither asked nor given, and murder is 
the rule. 

Therefore, it makes me laugh when some half-baked col- 
lege professor raises his feeble lament over the violation of the 
constitution or the bill of rights by one side or the other. There 
is no magic in the constitution that will settle a mortal con- 
flict. Ours is an essentially weak form of government, and our 
magistrates will not enforce the law against offenders who are 
backed by votes. In fact, the constitution is a broken reed 
when opposed to a determined and lawless class consciousness 
under a democratic form of government. 

5 3 3- 

Says His Prayers to the Constitution. 

These funny and perfunctory appeals to the sanctity of the 
constitution remind me of the words which Sam Blythe puts 
in the mouth of Senator Paxton, that genial old cynic who 
gives his advice to an aspiring young congressional politician 
in this wise : 

"I observe you've picked out the safe and sane specialty." 

"What do you mean?" 

"I mean the constitution. That's the good old stand-by for 
the orators, perfectly innocuous, perfectly respectable, and no 
chance for a come-back. If in doubt, speak on the consti- 
tution. It is always there, you know, and while it has been 
interpreted by eloquent orators and justices and lawyers and 
editors and statesmen of all classes, down to the last comma, 
it is always susceptible of further interpretation, and it is 
always safe. You'll never get into any trouble back home, or 
anywhere else, if you make the constitution your specialty. 
Besides, you'll get a reputation, for if you can comprehend any 
of it, you will stand out above these other dubs who can com- 
prehend none of it. Many a mediocre person has arrived at 
a reputation as a great statesman by standing up and defend- 
ing the dear old constitution, simply because the people who 
heard him and the people who wrote about him didn't know 
what he was talking about, any more than he did, but it sounded 
profound and learned." 



The Four Flushcrs. 

"I can point out to you half a dozen four flushers in this 
Senate and in the House, who are always referred to as great 
constitutional lawyers because they have hammered away at 
that immortal but resilient document, in speeches, interpreted 
it, defended it, upheld it, praised it, chanted hymns of joy 
over it, and all the time they were appearing in public with no 
come-back, you understand. There is no local politics in the 
constitution, no State politics nor any factional dispute. It is 
there, grand, gloomy and peculiar, and you can go as far as you 
like with it and get a lot of applause from people who don't 
know whether you are talking sense or rubbish." 

5 5 5 
A Law Ridden Country. 

America is the most law ridden country in the world and 
the least law-abiding. The other day Professor Carl Kelsey, 
of the University of Pennsylvania, addressing the Common- 
wealth Club of this city, advocated closing all the State legis- 
latures for ten years until observers of laws can catch up with 
those who make the laws. No, he was not joking, although it 
sounds like a joke. But in default of the professor's close 
seaon for lawmaking, Stanford and the University of California 
are preparing to take hold of the legislative idea and teach it 
how to shoot. So I learn from the Sacramento Union that the 
ruling passion of legislators to draw bills, measures, laws and 
amendments is recognized by the Leland Stanford University, 
which is now considering the training of a large corps of its 
students in legislative reference work. A. P. Will, chief of 
the legislative bureau, recently established in the Capitol, will 
co-operate with the university in turning out scientific law mak- 
ers. "It is an art in itself," said Will. "Stanford University 
has not fully decided on the plan, but is considering the prob- 
lem of instructing in legislative reference work." The Uni- 
versity of California also may aid in the educational work of 
the bureau. 

The inevitable result of this intersession activity will be 
more and more laws. Give us a rest. 

Now what is this mysterious legislative bureau of which the 
Union so casually speaks? Is this another one of Hiram 
Johnson's multifarious commissions? These commissions breed 
like rabbits. 



Pears' 

There's a unique 
adaptability about 
Pears' Soap. It makes 
the child enjoy its bath 
helps the mother pre- 
serve her complexion 
and the man of the 
house finds nothing 
quite so good for sha- 
ving. 

Have you used Pears 
Soap? 

Pears' the soap for the whole family 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 




The future woman will be bald if we may believe Dr. 

Broig, a German savant, who writes that "the physique of the 
new generation of women is slowly but surely undergoing a 
change. The breast is sinking in, the shoulders becomes more 
stooped; cold feet are becoming a normal manifestation, the 
hands are showing tendency toward a violet or purplish color, 
the face is becoming smaller, deep wrinkles in the forehead 
more frequent and the digestion getting worse. And that is 
not all. Bloodlessness is affecting the face and skull. The 
elasticity of the pores is decreasing and the nose is developing 
more and more. This decrease of vitality is affecting the 
scalp. Women today are losing hair as never before. This 
phenomena is the forerunner of the bald pate, hitherto the sole 
privilege of men. Women are marching rapidly toward bald- 
headedness." The learned doctor is talking nonsense of a 
rather silly sort. 

State Printer Richardson has notified the Board of Con- 
trol in relation to the colossal job of printing the booklet set- 
ing forth the direct legislation propositions, and the reasons 
>ro and con, to be submitted at the November election, that 
'it is difficult to ascertain the cost of publishing the pamphlet 
containing these amendments and propositions, for the reason 
that the number to be printed will not be definitely known for 
several months, and the number of propositions cannot be ab- 
solutely known until August 3d. The Secretary of State says 
there will be over 1,200,000 registered voters, and it will be 
necessary to print between 1,800,000 and 2,000,000 copies of 
these amendments." The conscientious voter will be expected 
to study 135 pages of small print to find out what he is to vote 
on. Incidentally it will cost $72,000 to print the pamphlets. 
These are some of the beauties of direct legislation. 

-Catalina Island brags of having the only precinct in 



California with a single voter. Charles A. Wilson is the only 
voter in Catalina precinct. He lives at the Isthmus, where he 
located twenty-five years ago, and since Avalon was made a 
city of the sixth class, he has been out in the cold so far as 
voting is concerned. This year he insists upon casting a pri- 
mary ballot, and all the machinery of election procedure must 
be put in motion to secure this one ballot. Ten ballots will be 
sent to this precinct so that Wilson will have the privilege of 
spoiling nine of them, if he so desires. It will cost more than 
$100 to send election judges and clerks to take his solitary bal- 
lot. But how about the light keeper on the Farallones? Is he 
to be neglected by the State? 

The cult of Joe Knowles spreads and a new sect of 

nature men is established in the delta region of San Joaquin 
county where among the sloughs and islands they call them- 
selves Edenites. The new garden of Eden established in the 
remote stretches of the island country has plenty of Adams, 
but no Eve. As yet no women have espoused the new beliet. 
There are perhaps ten or twelve men in the colony, tiach 
nature man's wardrobe consists of a bathrobe. The members 
of the new cult are as primitive in their dress as the law will 
allow. When at home it is said they wear nothing whatever, 
and they insist that the story of the fall of man is a myth 
without sense or foundation. 



The fable of the wolf and the lamb is illustrated in the 

politics of Butte County, where Roy Leonard and George Gard- 
ner are running for district attorney. In Chico, one learns 
that Gardner did not go one direction and Leonard another nor 
did they fail to meet, but instead they went around together. 
They met and were introduced to their respective friends to- 
gether; they talked the political situation to a fare-you-well 
wherever the opportunity afforded itself, and last, but not least, 
took lunch together. Whether or not they were working to- 
gether or keeping tab on each other's moves is not known. Now 
which was the wolf and which the lamb in this strange partner- 
ship? Why, little man, you pays your money and you takes 
your choice. 

Rabies is increasing in California, according to the State 

Board of Health, and there is an enlargement of the area in- 
volved. Dr. J. C. Geiger, chief bacteriologist of the State 
Board, has examined the brains of 322 dogs, and found 279 
giving positive evidence of the disease. Within recent months 
227 human beings have been bitten and 234 animals. The 
cases were no more frequent in the summer than in the winter. 
The number of counties from which specimens of rabid ani- 
mals were sent, was 31, an increase of over 16 over the year 
previous to the same date. Seven have died of rabies during 
the present year, and 269 have been given the Pasteur treat- 
ment. 

As for the hat check boys in the local hotels and 

restaurants and the alleged "tip trust" the public can afford to 
be indifferent with a plague on both your houses. It is re- 
lated that the hat check fiends fear the trust which is a cor- 
poration in New York which is said to have secured control 
of most of the hat checking stands and still steadily is reach- 
ing out towards the West. The plan of the so-called "tip 
trust" is to pay young and attractive girls small salaries to 
trade checks for hats and hats for dimes and then pocket all 
gratuities. When all is said and done the hat check nuisance 
is nothing better than a polite but shabby form of beggary. 

District Forester Coert Du Bois writes to the editor to 

explode the popular fallacy "that glass bottles serve to focus 
the sun's rays in such a way as to cause forest and brush fires 
in California. It may, therefore, be news to your readers to 
iearn that in the course of seven years' study of the causes of 
fires in this State, the Forest Service has never been able to 
find a single instance in verification of the theory. Further- 
more, experiments have been conducted by forest officers for 
the express purpose of verifying it, but so far without suc- 
cess." All right, Coert, dear boy, the fallacy will be consid- 
ered exploded. 

The remarkable success of the summer school at the 

University of California is supplemented by that of the cor- 
respondence school instituted for the first time this year, which 
has already 9,000 students. This is an all the year round 
school, and the eight thousand who are taking the free corre- 
spondence courses in agriculture, the thousand who are taking 
University Extension courses in various subjects of university 
grade, have all been receiving just as careful attention through 
the summer as throughout the rest of the year. 

Huerta never won a victory in battle while he was dic- 
tator; he did not stand with his back to the wall and bare his 
breast to his enemies; he did not die with his boots on in an 
act of final and desperate resistance in his capital. What he 
did was to retire in good season and escape to Europe on a 
German cruiser. Yet he, in certain quarters, was hailed 18 
months ago as Mexico's "man of blood and iron." 



Ai'ci-st 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




PLyEASURD'S WAND 

We obey no wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 




msm 



"A Modern Eve" at the Alcazar. 

_ A great big happy jostling throng taxed the capa- 
city of the Alcazar Theatre on Monday evening, the 
occasion being the now annual plunge of the Alcazar 
organization into musical comedy. The occasion was 
further augmented and emphasized by the return of 
a former favorite of this popular house, in the per- 
son of Charles Ruggles, and incidentally we were in- 
troduced to Mrs. Ruggles, known as Adele Rowland, 
who not so long ago was seen at another local house 
in the same play and the same role she is doing now. 
Altogether it was a most auspicious evening, and a 
general atmosphere of jollity and enthusiasm per- 
vaded the theatre, and the great audience was con- 
tinually on the qui vive, applauding each person and 
number as rapidly as was required. There is no use 
talking, that Alcazar following is certainly a loyal 
legion. They have no hesitancy in showing their 
affection for their favorites by vociferous applause, 
which at times borders on the demonstrative. Every 
body out in front Monday evening marveled at the 
completeness of the performance, which was gotten 
together in the short space of six days. Think of a 
full-fledged musical comedy which boasts a full size 
chorus and all the regular paraphernalia which go 
with such performances, being brought together and 
the performance going without a single hitch — and 
all in six days. They do big things at the Alcazar, 
and they do not brag about it. This sort of thing is 
getting to be a very common affair at the popular 
O'Farrell street playhouse. Miss Rowland as a come- 
dienne has a personality which is all her own. She 
crept into favor with little effort, merely repeating 
the success she scored when seen here before in the 
same role. In this instance, however, she had hubby 
Ruggles to work with, and to approve her efforts, 
and naturally she gave the audience the very best 
she had. Hubby Ruggles does not claim to be a 
musical comedy man, but all the same he caught the 
infection with good grace, and disported in a manner 
which at times was almost alarming, when we con- 
sider how we are accustomed to seeing the young 
gentleman in dignified roles. Ann Tasker, whom we 
pleasantly remember with the "Madame Sherry" or- 
ganization, brought her beautiful voice into use, and 
made an individual hit which was no doubt pleasing 
to the many friends and admirers she evidently had 
out in front. Her voice is more mellow and rings 
truer than before, and her rendering of "Is the girl you mar- 
ried still the girl you love?" had to be repeated again and 
again. Another addition to the Alcazar forces is statuesque 
Louise Orth, big and blonde and beautiful. Miss Orth is af- 
forded ample opportunity to show herself off to advantage, 
and right well does she do so. Coming back to the regulars 
of the company, probably the biggest hit was scored by Bert 
Wesner, who seems able to fit himself into any kind of en- 
vironment with equal facility and ability. 

Kernan Cripps also came nobly to the front and gave a good 
account of himself. Edmond Lowe was assigned another of 
those monocled chaps who swagger around and aim to look 
and act silly. Anything Lowe does he does well. Louise 
Brownell had a kind of a suffragette role of which she made a • 
great deal. She had a big success all of her own. More than 
a passing words of praise is due Ida Wyatt for the manner in 
which she took hold of the large chorus, a conglomerate lot 
of people, but a few days ago, and welded them into an effi- 
cient singiniT and dancing organization. They all acted like 
veterans, and contributed a goodly share to the success of the 
evening. 

A word of advice to those in any way interested is to the 



PAUL GERSON. 




■■■'■■ : '-* >-■'''■■■ ■:■ • ■■ 

- '■■■,■ ■ . ' I <-■■ 





Bertha Kalich, the celebrated emotional star at the Orpheum 

effect that you had better secure your seats as quickly as you 
can. They are going to be hard to get. The Alcazar has sel- 
dom registered such an all round success as "A Modern Eve." 
It is an evening of pure joy and clean fun. Popular demand 
will, of course, compel the management to run the piece beyond 
the customary week. 



DON'T FAIL TO VISIT THE 

PALACE HOTEL 

DURING 

Lunch Hour in the Beautiful Court and Grill 

CUISINE AND SERVICE PERFECT 

THE FAIRMONT UNDER SAME MANAGEMENT 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 



The Orpheum. 

Vinie Daly, grand opera prima donna and lightning change 
artist, is the headliner at the Orpheum this week. Her con- 
tribution to the melody of the performance comprises a "Mad- 
ame Butterfly" aria, a selection and a dance from "Carmen," 
and a dip into "La Boheme," for each of which she dons a dif- 
ferent costume fashioned both in the mode and the mood. She 
has a voice of great beauty, admirably trained. 

The Wharry Lewis Quartette gets and earns prolonged and 
unrestrained applause. Mr. Lewis, himself a violinist of _ vir- 
tuoso attainments, has gathered about him four other musicians, 
each of whom takes the stage in turn for solo work, and all 
of whom together assist him in putting over one of the real 
musical hits of a season crowded with them. 

Miss Adelaide Bell is the leading member of three acrobats, 
and she is a wonder. This light and airy dancer came out in 
rippling silk, with a parasol held high overhead, and proceeded 
to waft the toe of her slipper up to the fringe of the parasol, 
while the orchestra blew merrily. She was very light and 
graceful, and certainly the Vinie Daly of the program's calis- 
thenics. 

Evangeline Lewis sings three or four numbers admirably, 
and E. Arnold Johnson makes the piano do wonders. Leona 
Henderson, 'cellist, and Eleanor Greve, flutist, complete a 
strong combination. 

Rellow, who works the mentaphone, makes a hit all his own. 
The rough humor of Edmond Hayes' character skit, "The 
Piano Movers," has lost nothing with the passing seasons. 
Ward, Bell and Ward bring the show to a close with an acro- 
batic act that you'll wait for, called "Under the White Top." 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



"She is simply mad on the subject of germs, and steril- 
izes or filters everything in the house." "How does she get 
along with her family?" "Oh, even her relations are strained." 
— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



Diogenes was looking for an honest man. "What 

luck?" asked the wayfarer. "Oh, pretty fair," replied Dioge- 
nes; "I still have my lantern." — Life. 



Hemmandhaw — Is there any way to make the women 

dress decently? Mrs. Hemmandhaw — Certainly there is. "Well, 
what is it?" "Kill off the men." — Youngsiown Telegram. 



"Where's your little brother?" "He hurt himself." 

"How?" "We were seeing who could lean out of the window 
the farthest, and he won."- — Chicago Daily News. 



"Quick, quick, my dear — everybody else is in the life- 
boat. The ship is sinking." "Wait a moment. I cannot be 
seen like this. The life-belt makes my coat pucker." — The 
Bystander. 



The East End L. R. Weinmann Club has been formed at 

3272 Liberty avenue, Alameda, to further the candidacy of 
Weinmann for Alameda Justice of the Peace. Weinmann will 
speak Saturday night at 3273 Liberty avenue. Officers of the 
club were elected as follows: C. B. Hollywood, president; A. 
C. Remick, vice-president; W. H. Myers, secretary. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Alcazar. — Nothing could possibly stop "A Modern Eve" at 
the Alcazar Theatre. The glittering summer musical show 
caught the town by the ear, and it has led all good San Fran- 
ciscans to the door of the popular O'Farrell street temple of 
amusement in droves. Enchanting waltzes, swinging melodies 
and captivating ensemble numbers, to say nothing of ringing 
specialties and tuneful solos, hold sway at the Alcazar this 
week, and the round-up of principals and big, stunning chorus, 
are the talk of the town. Popular Charles Ruggles and dainty 
little Adele Rowland could not have hit upon a better vehicle 
for their re-introduction to local theatre-goers than the tuneful 
Hollaender-Gilbert-Hough musical comedy, and nightly they 
are being received vociferously in their respective roles. 

The show will be on tap at the Alcazar for a second week, 

commencing on Monday night, August 10th, and a duplicate of OfpflSIOri 
the present tremendous business is looked for by the manage- 
ment of the popular playhouse. 



Billy — Do you believe in signs? Milly — Yes, indeed. 

Billy — Well, last night I dreamed you were madly in love with 
me. What is that a sign of? Milly — That's a sign you were 
dreaming. — Penn State Froth. 



Columbia. — Holbrook Blinn and the members of the Princess 
Theatre Company, arrived in San Francisco last Tuesday, com- 
ing direct from New York City to fulfill a limited engagement 
at the Columbia Theatre. Mr. Blinn and the Princess Players 
created a veritable sensation during their appearances for the 
past two seasons in New York at the Princess Theatre, in pre- 
sentations of one-act plays of European and American au- 
thorship. The program includes four complete one-act plays at 
every performance, and during the San Francisco engagement, 
which begins next Monday night, August 10th, the entire reper- 
toire will be given. Matinees Wednesdays and Saturdays. 
• * • 

Orpheum. — The Orpheum bill for next week presents a very 
attractive appearance. It will have as its principal headline 
feature Bertha Kalich, the greatest of all emotional actresses. 

James T. Duffy and Mercedes Lorenze will appear in the 
miniature musical comedy, "Springtime," which consists of 
songs and patter by Mr. Duffy. 

The Trans-Atlantic Trio will present a whimsical act in two 
parts, rendering vocal and instrumental selections. 

A special added feature, and one which will excite particular 
interest in society circles, will be the appearance of Mile. 
Louisa La Gai, premier danseuse at the Grand Opera, Paris, 
and her twelve Society Monogram girls. 

The holdovers will be Edmond Hayes & Co., in "The Piano 
Movers;" Ward, Bell and Ward; Rellow, creator of the menta- 
phone novelty, and the successful prima donna, Vinie Daly, in 
songs from operas she has sung. 



O'Farrell Street near Powell 
Rhone Kearnj 2 

Commencing Monday Night. August 10th. Matinees Thursday. Saturday 
Sunday. SECOND BIG HURRAH WEEK! 

CHARLES RUGGLES- ADELE ROWLAND 
In The Alcazar's Sparkling Success Summer Musical Show 

"A MODERN EVE" 
Tuneful Song Successes, Including The Fatuous "Good-Bye Evenbody.' 
A Stunning Beauty Chorus That Can Sing. Permanent Alcazar Prices ! 
Summer Prices — Nights. 25c. 50c. 75c. Mats.. 25c, 35c, 50c. 
A good orchestra seat at night for 50c 

O'Farrell Street Bet. Stockton and Powell 
Phone Douglas 70 
WEEK BEGINNING THIS SCNPAY AFTERNOON MATINEF. EVERY HAY 

MARVELOUS VAUDEVILLE 
BERTHA KALICH anr] Company in the Epilogue to Echegaraj' 
"MARIANA:" IAS. T. DUFFY and MERCEDES LORENZE in "Springtime;' 
THE TRANS-ATLANTIC TRIO featuring Harry (lark. World Famous 

Banioist; VINIE DALY in songs From Operas She Has Sung; EDMOND 
HAY'ES & CO.: WARD, BELL A WARD; RELLOW, SPECIAL ADDED 
ATTRACTION— MLLE. LOUISE LA OA1 and 1IKH I-' SOCIETY MONOGRAM 
GIRLS in DANSES DE RENAISSANCE. 

Evening Prices, 10c. 25c. 50c, 76c. Box seats, 11. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays). 10c. 25c, 50c Phone Douglas 70. 



HOTEL SHATTUCK 

FIREPROOF 

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 

Thirty-five Minutes From San Francisco 

$3.00 per day American Plan $1.50 per day European Plan 



FALL Styles and Fabrics are Awaiting Your Inspection 

L. P. KURTZMAN 

LADIES' TAILOR 

New Location 474 Geary St. San Francisco 

Telephone Prospect 3594 



Before lO A. M. Res. Phone Prospect 1973 

After lO A. M. Studio " ,r 2177 

OLITA LUNT YOUNGBERG 

FOR THE STUDY OF CLASSICAL AND MODERN DANCES 

Private Lessons Given 1443 POLK STREET 

By Appointment Only Studio 1 1 

Sketches For Vaudeville Furnished 



August 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



WAR. 

Ruth Comfort Mitchell, formerly of San Francisco, and now 
a resident of Los Angeles, is the author of a remarkable poem 
published recently in the Smart Set Magazine. Miss Mitchell 
is a successful dramatic author, and has scored more than one 
success in vaudeville. Her lively sketch, entitled "The Goat," 
has made a hit on the Orpheum Circuit, and her comedy, "The 
Modern Girl," still holds the stage. Miss Mitchell's father is 
owner of the Hollenbeck Hotel in Los Angeles, and managing 
director of the Alexandria. Her brother, Mawatt Mitchell, 
was formerly a prominent member of the Stanford football 
team. Following is Miss Mitchell's poem: 

Billy the Soldier Boy. 

He marched away with a blithe young score of him 

With the first volunteers, 
Clear-eyed and clean and sound to the core of him, 

Blushing under the cheers. 
They were fine, new flags that swung a-flying there, 
Oh, the pretty girls he glimpsed a-crying there, 

Pelting him with pinks and with roses — 
Billy, the Soldier Boy! 

Not very clear in the kind young heart of him 

What the fuss was about, 
But the flowers and the flags seemed part of him — 

The music drowned his doubt. 
It's a fine, brave sight they were a-coming there 
To the gay, bold tune they kept a-drumming there, 

While the boasting fifes shrilled jauntily — 
Billy, the Soldier Boy! 

Soon he is one with the blinding smoke of it — 

Volley and curse and groan : 
Then he has done with the knightly joke of it — 

It's rending flesh and bone. 
There are pain-crazed animals a-shrieking there 
And a warm blood stench that is a-reeking there; 

He fights like a rat in a corner — 
Billy, the Soldier Boy! 

There he lies now, like a ghoulish score of him, 

Left on the field for dead: 
The ground all round is smeared with the gore of him — 

Even the leaves are red. 
The Thing that was Billy lies a-dying there, 
Writhing and a-twisting and a-crying there; 

A sickening sun grins down on him — 
Billy, the Soldier Boy! 

Still not quite clear in ihe poor, wrung heart of him 

What the fuss was about, 
See where he lies — or a ghastly part of him — 

While life is oozing out: 
There are loathsome things he sees a-crawling there; 
There are hoarse-voiced crows he hears a-calling there, 

Eager for the foul feast spread for them — 
Billy, the Soldier Boy! 

How much longer, Lord, shall we bear it all? 

How many more red years? 
Story it and glory it and share it all. 

In seas of blood and tears ? 
They are braggart attitudes we've worn so long; 
They are tinsel platitudes we've sworn so long — 

We who have turned the Devil's Grindstone, 
Borne with the hell called War! 



Georgia Lawyer (to colored prisoner) — Well, Ras, as 

you want me to defend you, have you any money? Rastus — 
No; but I'se got a mule and a few chickens, and a hog or two. 
Lawyer — Those will do very nicely. Now, let's see — what do 
they accuse you of stealing? Rastus — Oh, a mule and a few 
chickens, and a hog or two. — Kansas City Star. 



OBITUARY. 
I . J. Moynihan. 

Timothy J. Moynihan, one of the oldest manufacturers in 
San Francisco, died on Tuesday at the age of 80. He was born 
m County Cork, Ireland, and came to San Francisco in 1857. In 
that year he established at Beale and Market streets the firm 
of T. J. Moynihan & Co., boiler manufacturers, which has con- 
tinued down to the present day. A widow and two daughters 
survive him. 



Chief Justice W. H. Beatty. 

Chief Justice William H. Beatty, of the State Supreme Court, 
died on Tuesday last at the age of 76 years. His death had 
been expected, and was due to heart disease, from which he had 
suffered for a considerable time. Present at his death were 
his wife and his surviving son. Chief Justice Beatty was Cali- 
fornia's most eminent jurist. If he had lived to the expiration 
of his present term, January, 1915, he would have completed 
his twenty-sixth year of continuous service as Chief Justice. 
Owing to his extended term of office, he had announced several 
months ago his intention of stepping aside at the conclusion of 
his present term. 

Chief Justice Beatty was born in Lucas County, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 18, 1836, coming to California with his parents, Henry 
Oscar and Margaret Boone Beatty, in March, 1853, by way of 
the Isthmus. In 1856 William went back East to study law at 
the University of Virginia. Shortly after the expiration of a 
term on the Nevada Supreme Bench he returned to California, 
and in 1889 was elected Chief Justice of the California Su- 
preme Court. 



Old Lady — Does your horse ever shy at motors ? Cabby 

— Lor' bless yer, no, lady: 'e didn't even shy when railway 
trains fust come in. — Pearson's Weekly. 



FRANCE AND GERMANY. 

"On a Franco-German rapprochement depends the peace of 
the world," is the declaration of Baron d'Estournelles de Con- 
stant, Senator of France, and member of the Hague Tribunal, 
and one of the most indefatigable workers for the peace of the 
world. When he was French Charge d'Affaires in London, he 
helped largely to bring about the entente cordiale. This was 
no sooner accomplished than he set himself with dogged deter- 
mination to the far harder task of inducing his countrymen to 
hold out the hand of friendship to Germany. 

This distinguished worker in the cause of international peace 
has contributed to the Daily Chronicle an article showing how 
the recent Franco-German inter-parliamentary conferences at 
Berne and Bale are but the development of their first visit to 
the British Parliament in July, 1903. "The one follows logi- 
cally from the other; and the sooner the fact is grasped that 
the entente cordiale and the Franco-German rapprochement are 
part and parcel of the same idea, one and the same action, the 
better." 

Baron d'Estournelles argues that the Anglo-French rap- 
prochement — what we call the entente cordiale — was an entente 
for peace, not an entente for war like that of the rapprochement 
between France and Great Britain at the time of the Crimean 
War. "For this reason the Anglo-Russian rapprochement fol- 
lowed the Anglo-French entente cordiale as a matter of course. 
In that fact lay the great innovation, one of the applications 
of the new policy we are pursuing. This policy would have 
been at once vitiated and warped were the entente cordiale to 
have become a weapon in the hands of Anglo-French diplo- 
macy, and, after that, of the Triple Entente, against Germany." 

"The conference at Berne last year," says the Baron, "was 
a first protest on the part of France and Germany against the 
absurdity of a policy which was the exact opposite of that 
which was in its germ in the entente cordiale. The conference 
at Bale this year has renewed and stated this protest in pre- 
cise terms. 

"In a few months representatives of the two French and 
German parliaments will meet simultaneously both in France 
and Germany to confirm our first declarations of 1903 in Lon- 
don, to say once more and more forcibly than ever: 'We want 
the entente for peace.' The Franco-German rapprochement 
will be effected, like the Anglo-French rapprochement, in spite 
of the jingo press, in spite of malevolence and irony; it will be 
effected by mutual concessions which will take definite shape 
in proportion as contact is established between the Parliamen- 
tary representatives of the two countries." 



<2 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 







Ned Greenway is the most sought after man in California. 
If the warring armies of Europe were after him, he could not 
be more beset by clamoring hordes. He made a timely de- 
parture from the other side of the pond, but there are moments 
now, particularly the warm moments of the day, when he must 
wish that he were jolly well immersed in that pond instead of 
safely over on this side of it. There is not a more talented 
pair of feet in these parts than those attached to the person 
of Greenway, and neither age nor rotundity can impair the 
skill of those feet when the dance music is on. But Greenway 
is not keen about having the music on every minute of the day 
— there are moments when he wants to put at least one foot on 
the accustome 1 polished rail, and there are other less slippery 
places where his feet are wont to tarry. 

But Greenway came back from Paris the other day with the 
"lulufardo," the Portuguese dance which was the rage over 
there, animating his whole being. He hied immediately to the 
Tavern at Tahoe, and Mrs. Fred Kohl discovered at once that 
the new dance was tapping at his heels. She invited him over 
to dinner that night, and immediately after dinner the czar of 
the dance lined up the hostess and her house guests, and be- 
gan instructing them in the intricacies of the measures to which 
European society was twirling its toes before the war alarums 
sounded. Greenway has a more forthright vocabulary than the 
ordinary dancing master dares to employ, and by means of 
this vocabulary and patient drilling in the steps, he managed 
to give them a pretty fair idea of the dance. He promised to 
come over the next night and polish them off in the steps. He 
even went so far as to leave the music there, so that the women 
could copy it, for it is still impossible to buy the music here, 
and Greenway, unfortunately, brought over only two copies. 

The next morning before he was up there was a giggly, 
frilly, fluttering call over the telephone, and the sugar coated 
little girl on the other end wanted to know whether dear, kind 
Mr. Greenway would not come down and teach one or two of 
the girls and boys the new steps, so that they could dance the 
lulufardo that afternoon at the dansant which the hotel spon- 
sors. So it went the entire time that Greenway "rested" at 
Tahoe. Had he charged for his services, his pile would have 
been welcomed by any war exchequer. It was even suggested 
that the appearance of one or two professional dancing masters 
in those parts could be explained on the score of their desire 
to "spot" the new dance. 

Now Greenway is en route to Del Monte, and not looking for- 
ward to a life of cushioned ease. He plans to stay until after 
the sports tournament in September providing his health will 
stand the strain. The chaps who go in for tennis, or golf, or 
polo, or even football or baseball, will have a very mild and 
peaceful and even slothful time of it compared to the pace that 
the energetic pursuers cf the dance have out for the genial 
Ned, who, willy-nilly, will be forced to put all his women 
friends through the intricacies of the lulufardo, which has as 
much tempo and zip as its name implies, and is almost as vio- 
lent as the pink color in which the Portuguese inventors of the 
dance love to bedeck themselves. 

© © © 
And all the while Greenway wears an amused and contented 
quirk at the corner of his mouth, though he may attempt the 
serious. Society is begging him to organize the dansants for 
this winter, and doing its begging in the kneeling position. The 
dansants and other factors conspired to stiffen Greenway up 
to the point of retiring from the managerial field of balls, and 
once arrived at the sticking point, he intends to stick all along 
the line. But it is very gratifying to have to resist an organ- 
ized effort to get him back into the nerve racking business 
again. 

The situation in the dancing world is approaching a crisis, 
and society looks to Greenway to Napoleon it out of this awk- 
ward pass, but Greenway is evidently determined not to put 
on the mantle of the director-general. Who will do it? This 



interrogation has the power to send the smart set ruminating 
down the list of possibilities, even at a time when war news 
and expatriated Americans subjected to its inconveniences 
holds first place. The new dances have not lost their popular- 
ity, but it is an established fact that the background provided 
for them last winter will have to be somewhat altered. Society 
disported itself at tea time at dansants sponsored by a list of 
patronesses who were supposed to scan the list of applicants 
for admission. The credit for the introduction of these dances 
must be given to the Douglas Cranes, who are now dancing 
their thistle-down way over the profitable circuits of Eastern 
vaudeville. It took persuasive power, raised to the "nth" de- 
gree, to bring the management ot the St. Francis to a co- 
operative interest in these affairs, and then the hotel refused 
to have anything to do with the guest list, but put it up to a 



Hotel St. Francis 

The Pivotal Point of the 
Social World 

Under the Management of James Woods 



Jl Quiet Hotel of Unusual Excellence 

Bellevue Hotel 

Geary and Taylor, San Francisco 



Caters (^specially to Luncheons and Banquets 

H. W. WILLS, Manager 



HOTEL OAKLAND 

30 Minutes from San Francisco 

Direct Ferry to Exposition Grounds 

Noted for Cuisine and Service Rates Reasonable 

Under Management of Victor Rciter 



Next Saturday 

Order out the car and come on down to 

SANTA CRUZ 

The roads are bully and so is 

CASA del REY 



$7 ROUND TRIP TO 

Anderson Springs 

By Writing to 
ROSE E. ANDERSON 

Anderson's Springs Lake County, Cal. 



August 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



^roup of patronesses, headed by Mrs. Henry T. Scott, to draw 
the lines with their practiced hands. 

The result was that the attendance largely radiated the 
effulgence of Burlir.game, with now and then a few stray lights 
of lesser candlepower that in some unaccounted way found their 
bold way into the company, and 'always with the result that 
the patronesses were put to much trouble and investigation. 
But the tribulations of the patronesses were mild compared 
to those of the hotel management, who were beset on all sides 
with complaints. This man, who had spent many golden dol- 
lars at the hotel, could not understand why he could not have 
cards for the mere asking at the desk; that woman who had 
swished her silken way to many an expensive luncheon and din- 
ner table could not understand why she could not have cards 
from the hotel for the asking. 

The St. Francis has decided that it will not run the dansants 
this coming season, with or without exhibition dancing. I un- 
derstand that this decision is irrevocable. The Palace has not 
yet decided what it will do in the matter. The dansants at both 
places were so successful to all outward appearances that one 
feels sure that the inward disturbances must have been pretty 
severe to bring the St. Francis to such a decision. Society 
hears this verdict with tears. Of course, this does not mean 
that groups of people cannot arrange to have a dansant every 
minute of the day at the St. Francis. It simply means that the 
hotel has entirely shifted the burden, but stands ready to do 
business at the old stand. Under this ultimatum it will be 
incumbent for some one in the smart set to organize some af- 
ternoon dances in order to gratify the enthusiasm for these af- 
fairs. They can be so exclusive that no one outside of the 
sacred circle may break in with a Gattling gun; they can be cut 
and fitted to the exact measure of the smart clique in society, 
but some one has to do the cutting and fitting ! Greenway says 
"no, thank you," he is tired of tailoring the dancing stunts for 
society. It has been suggested that Mrs. Fred Kohl would be 
just the person to get up a club of this sort, but when the sug- 
gestion was made to Mrs. Kohl, she hummed a bar from the 
lulufardo, and looked over the blue waters of Tahoe with the 
expression of one who would see society in Portugal before she 
would allow herself to get into a job like that. Mrs. Horace 
Pillsbury is another executive society woman who could put 
over the job. Mrs. Pillsbury has successfully organized danc- 
ing classes for the sub-junior set, but she is too wise not to 
appreciates that the way of the olders is beset with more 
difficulties. Of course, there are several women with some 
claim on society and less on financial competence, who would 
love to manage these affairs for the percentage of profit which 
they could quietly squeeze out of it, but it is not the wish of 
those interested in projecting the right kind of dansant over 
the winter calendar that the management of them be turned 
over to this sort of person. Unless some member of the smart 
set can be prevailed upon to offer up her tact and her social 
position and her executive ability on the altar of this par- 
ticular goddess of the dance, it is possible that the situation will 
be met by a group of women who will divide the responsibility 
in this just as they have for other affairs. Mrs. Walter Martin, 
Mrs. Fred McNear, Mrs. Will Taylor, Mrs. Gus Taylor, Mrs. 
Gene Murphy, Mrs. Fred Kohl and a number of other young 
matrons in the Burlingame set, who are masters of the art, 
and would hate to see the afternoon performances in it die out, 
may be counted upon to divise some way of continuing the 
dansants for their particular set. Meanwhile those who have 
heard of the determination of the St. Francis in the matter are 
wondering whether the management is right to withdraw its 
personal interest, while the dansants have a record of glory, 
and if they are to decline this season, the blame cannot be put 
upon the broad shoulders of the hotel, but upon whomsoever 
undertakes to run them. 



DRIVING THE LAST SPIKE. 

All the commercial bodies of Humboldt County have com- 
bined to celebrate the driving of the last spike on the North- 
western Pacific Railroad which will connect Eureka with San 
Francisco. The last rail will be laid and the last spike driven 
probably on October 15th, according to officials of the road. 
The ceremony will be held at Cain Rock on the Eel River, 
which is midway between Alder Point and Island Mountain. 



"It says here that the King of Sweden is raising hun- 
dreds of collies on a farm," said the Boob. "Well, what about 
it?" asked the grouch. "Nothing. Only I was wondering if 

he will use them to drive his Stockholm," replied the boob. 

Cincinnati Enquirer. 




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14 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 




SOCKlr PERSOML ITEMS 




ENGAGEMENTS. 

BLANDING-GOODRICH. — The engagement was announced Saturday of 
M5ss Henriette Blanding to Chauncey Goodrich. Miss Blanding is 
one of the most intellectual girls in the smart set, having taken hon- 
ors at Vassar, where she has graduated, and afterwards took a post- 
graduate course. Mrs. Frederick Sharon. Lady Fermer Hesketh, Mrs. 
Edith Coleman Blanding and Miss Lena Blanding are her aunts, and 
her uncles are William S. Tevis and Dr. Harry L.. Tevis. Her cousins 
are Mrs. Thomas Hesketh. William S. Tevis, Jr., Lloyd Tevis. Gordon 
Tevis, Lansing Tevis. Her fiance is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
E. Goodrich, formerly of San Jose, but now residing in Pacific avenue. 
He is a graduate of Harvard Law College and is a rising young at- 
torney of this city. His sister. Miss Elizabeth Goodrich, was re- 
cently married to Dr. James Whitney. Miss Blanding and Mr. Good- 
rich will be married some time in November. 

EI..OESSER-LA PLANT. — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Eloesser announce the 
engagement of their daughter. Miss Helen Eloesser, to Mr. Norman 
La Plant, son of Mrs. N. La Plant of Shasta. The Eloessers are at 
Mill Valley for the summer. 

HABMON-Tt'CKEY. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward Newell Harmon announce 
the engagement of their daughter, Miss Minna Keith Harmon, to 
Dr. Harry A. Tuckey of Belvedere. Miss Harmon is a granddaughter 
of the late Wm. Keith, the celebrated California artist. She is a 
graduate of one of the fashionable schools of Boston. Dr. Tuckey 
is a son of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Tuckey of Belvedere, a graduate of 
the University of California, where he was a member of several of 
the leading fraternities and societies identified with school life there. 

HOLLERAN-GEGAN. — Mrs. Lawrence A. Chevallier announces the en- 
gagement of her sister. Miss Winnifred Sara Gertrude Holleran, to 
Ambrose Francis Gegan. Miss Holleran is an accomplished musician 
and is the possessor of an exquisite voice. Her fiance Is connected 
with the Hercules Powder Company. 

AIASON-ROCKWOOD. — An engagement of interest to local smart so- 
ciety and to service circles is announced: that of Miss Katherine 
Fielding Mason, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John T. Mason, of 
Sierra Madre, Cal.. to Lieutenant Alfred S. Rockwood, of the Twelfth 
Infantry. The wedding will take place in October. 

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
SALSIG-CARTWRIGHT.— The date for the wedding of Miss Myrtle Le- 
nore Salsig and Morse Adams Cartwright has been set for August 
15th, the ceremony to be solemnized in St. John's Presbyterian 
Church in Berkeley. The wedding will be one of the brilliant events 
of the late summer, and the charming bride is to have several at- 
tendants. Several hundred guests will be present at the church, but 
the reception following the ceremony will be only for relatives and 
intimate friends of the couple. 

WEDDINGS. 

l:ANGHAM-ROSS.— Miss Camilla J. Bangham became the bride of Geo. 
P. Ross of Palo Alto last week at the home of her parents. Mr. and 
Mrs. F. H. Bangham, in Susahville. Miss Bangham has a host of 
friends in the cities about the bay, where she has taken an active 
part in the gaieties of the younger set. Mr. Ross is a law student 
at Stanford University, and is well known in musical circles. The 
young people will make their home in Palo Alto. 

STEIGER-MITCHELL.— A pretty wedding took place last week in Ala- 
meda, when Miss Florence Steiger became the bride of James Henry 
Mitchell, Jr., of San Francisco. The ceremony took place at the 
home of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Steiger, in Centra) 
n venue, in the presence of a group of relatives and close friends of 
the couple. Miss Helen Koehler of San Francisco was maid of honor, 
and Miss Ruth Moore, of Berkeley, attended as bridesmaid. Wm. 
Stafford was groomsman for Mitchell. After a honeymoon tour of 
the South, the couple will take up their residence in San Francisco, 
where Mitchell is engaged in the practice of law. Mitchell is a son 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Mitchell of Willows. 

TEAS. 

FEHLEISEN.— In honor of Madame Eckhardt von Schack, wife of Acting 
Consul Baron von Schack, the German representative at this port in 
the absence of Consul Franz Bopp, Mrs. F. Fehleisen entertained at 
a smart tea on Tuesday afternoon, assembling a number of the 
prominent German-American women for the occasion. 

ROMAINE.— Mrs. William Romaine entertained at an informal tea for 
about thirty-five guests on Friday afternoon at her home in Jackson 
street in compliment to Miss Leslie Brown. 

SCHUMAN. — Mrs. Roland Schuman was hostess at an informal tea Tues- 
day afternoon at the home of the hostess' parents. Judge and Mrs, 
Jeremiah Sullivan, on Pacifir- avenue, in compliment to Mrs. Frank- 
Barrows Freyer. 

SEQUOIA CLUB. — The members of the Sequoia Club entertained Mr. 
and Mrs. Wallace Monroe at a tea at their attractive clubhouse in 
Washington street last week. The decorations were effectively car- 
ried out with woodwardia ferns and red carnations. 

SMITH. — In honor of Miss Gladys Deal of San Francisco, Mrs. Sydney 
Wilbur Smith was hostess last week at an informal tea at her home 
on Vernon Heights. A groupe of elope friends was invited to meet 
Miss Deal. 



TASHEIRA. — Mrs. Lynn Ross of Indiana arrived here recently t<. spend 
two months with her aunt. Mrs. Lewis Tasheira, at the latter'a home 
on Vernon Heights. Mrs. Ross was Miss Gladys Gould before her 
marriage two years ago, and this is her first visit to her formi r 
home since the wedding. Mrs. Tasheira gave a tea in honor ol .Mis. 
Ross this week, and included in the guest list a coterie of .Mis Roes' 
friends from both sides of the bay. 

LUNCHEONS. 

BERTHOLF. — Mrs. Rennie Piere Schwerin, Mrs. Parker Syms and .Mrs. 
Frederick Freeman were the guests of honor at an informal luncheon 
given by Mrs. Wallace Bertholf in the Palace Hotel Monday. The 
table was decorated with roses and maidenhair fern. 

BUTTON.— Captain and Mrs. Franklin Hutton were host and hostess .it 
an elaborate luncheon in their quarters at Fort McDowell on Sunday. 

LIVERMORE.— Mrs. Norman Llvermore entertain.^ at luncheon Monday 

in honor of Mrs. Charli-s Gnld tliwaito. 

MATSON. — Mrs. Wilson Matson was hostess at a luncheon recently in 
compliment to Miss Anna Van Winkle, who is leaving for Vassal*. 

MBIN. — Mrs. Thomas Mein had as her guests of honor at luncheon On 
Monday. Mrs. Helen K. Williams and .Miss Virginia Deal. 

ROBINSON. — Miss Alma Robinson, daughter of Captain and Mrs. Robin- 
son, TJ. S. A., entertained Monday afternoon at an informal luncheon 
at the Palace. 

DINNERS. 

MARTIN. — Mrs. Eleanor Martin presided at an informal dinner on Sunday 
evening at her home in Broadway, ii being in the waj Ol B ffl 
to Baron von Schroeder. 

DANCES. 

CLUFF-HOLMES.— Miss Hilda Cluff and Miss Elizabeth Holmes ar- 
ranged a dancing party last week on Thursda i e ening al the Sequoia 
Club, in honor of Miss May Ridgeway of Los Angeles, who Is tin 
house guest of Miss Cluff. 

kells. — Mr. and Mrs. Charles Par melee ICl-iis entertained a number 
friends at a dance which they gave Saturday evening at the Marin 
County Club. The affair was in honor of their son-in-law and daugh- 
ter, Captain Conrad Babioek, U. S. A., and Mrs. Bal i 

SCHMIEDEL. — Mr. and Mis. Edward G. Schmledel gave a dancing part) 
Wednesday night at the Lagunitas GoU and Countrj Club in honoi 
of their young daughter, Miss Doris Schmledel and her SCl I friends. 

WEEK-END PARTIES. 
EMMONS. — A delightful week-end party was entertained by .Mis. George 
W. Emmons and her two daughters, the Misses Mai I and Ger- 
trude Emmons, al theii country place on Mount Diablo, 

ARRIVALS. 

ANDRUSS. — Mr. and Mrs. Albert Andruss are down from their ht 

in Nevada, passing a fortnight or so at the Bote! Cecil, 

AVENALI. — Mr. and Mrs, Lorenzo Avenali returned to town Monda; al 
ter a few days' visit in San Rafael, where they were \u, gui 
Mrs. Truxtun Beale. 

CHAMBERS. — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Edward > 

from their honeymoon in the East, and are domiciled at their new 
home in Washington street. 

CLARK. — Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark, their son Edward and daughter 
Helen, have returned after a week in town t>> the McClOud River, 
where they are the guests of Mrs. Phoebe Hearst. 

COOL. — Dr. LuElla Cool, who has been spending a month at her bun- 
galow, Casa Esperanza. Camp Meeker, has returned to the Cadillac 
Hotel with her guests, Mrs. Newcomb. of New Jersey, Mis. li- 
the vice-grand of Loyal Lodge of San Francisco, and Mis Carrit 
Freeman. 

CLIFFORD.— Miss Marguerite Clifford, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Clifford of this city, is now in Los Angeles, aftej Spending tl 
months in the East. 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY 19 A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX COURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTiriER 

Removes Tan, Pimple*. Freckle*. Moth-Pelcnea, 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish oo 
beawly. and defies detection. Il has Hood ihe test 
of 66 yean; no other h»i, and is so harmless we 
lasle it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The disiintpjishea Dr. 
L. A. Sayre said to a lady of the bant -ton (a patient): 
"Ai yea iidiei will use tbem, I recommend 'Gob- 
rsod'i Cream' ai ibe leajt harmful of all the SIub 
preparations." . 

For tale by all Druggist j and Fancy Goods Dealer*. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infante and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieve* Skin Irritation), cure* Sun- 
burn and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cent*, by Mail 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. Price 31.00. by nail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Propr. i7 Creal Jones Si.. New York C.iy. 




August 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



I 'INK ELS 1'IK I. '.: Lloyd, « I 

sts •" "10 Pollci ill Santa Barbara, are al their h 

Kr.-ui 

GREENWAV Mr. Udwiu-d Graenway returned to San Francisco Satur- 
day, and li g bis apartments al the Palrroi 

HASTINGS Mi and Mra Philip Hastings have returned to their home 

In f , ibles, Sonoma 

County. 

MCALLISTER Mr. and Mis. M. He ter, Miss Ethel KcA 

ami Otis McAllister, who have b iska tor the pasl month, 

u home In Jackson street. 

MCMILLAN. Mrs Robert i 1 ' McMillan is In town, having come ( 

New Fork to pass the Bummer wiih her parents. 

MILLER.— Mr. and Mrs. Win. s. Miller have returned from a motor trip 
through Sonoma County, and are again domiciled at their apart,- 
nta at tin.' Fairmont. 

.Mi iKIITT.— Hr. and Mrs. Herbert Moflitt and Miss Virginia Joliiffe ar- 
rival home last week niter a visit of several weeks at Lake Tahoe. 

Nur WELL. — Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Newell, Jr.. who have been the guests 
of various friends in Los Angeles by whom they were most pleas- 
antly entertained, returned to their home on Russian Hill this week. 

NIELSON. — Miss Matie Nielson. of Pocatello, Idaho, is visiting her sister- 
in-law. Airs Jos. Leroy Nielson, in this city, and for whom a 
number of delightful affairs are being planned. 

SELFRIDGE.— Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge have returned permanently 
from Salt Lake City, where they have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
J. Frank Judge. 

WISSER. — Mrs. Wisser and her run. John Philip Wisser, Jr., have re- 
turned from Santa Barbara, where they have been visiting Mrs. Wis- 
ser's parents, Colonel and Mrs. Hollister. 

WOOLSEV. — Mrs. Chester Woolsey and her aunt, Miss Jennie Chambers, 
who have been guests at the Casa del Rey, Santa Cruz, for the past 
three weeks, returned to the city recently. 

WRIGHT. — Mr. and Mrs. Dexter M. Wright have returned from a tour 
of the Hawaiian Islands. 

DEPARTURES. 

BISHOP. — Mrs. Thomas Bishop is in Southern California as the guest 
of friends on a motor trip. Mrs. Bishop will return next week. 

FARQUHARSON.— Mrs. David Farquharson left Tuesday for Santa Bar- 
bara, where she will be the house guest for a fortnight of Mrs. Geo. 
Tallant. 

GASSNER. — Mrs. Louis Gassner left recently on her semi-annual trip 
East. 

GHIRARDELLI.— The D. S. Ghirardelli family left this week for Tahoe, 
and expect to be guests at the Tavern during tic month of August. 

GREENWAV. — Mr. Ned Greenway left this week for Del Monte, to re- 
main until after the sports tournament in September. 

JEBSBN. — Captain Fred Jebsen, the confidential agent of the German 
government in San Francisco, who entertained the officers of His 
Imperial Majesty's cruiser Nuernberg at many luncheon and dinner 
parties during their recent stay in this port, is in Mexico on busi- 
ness. 

LAINE. — Mrs. J. R. Lalne and Miss Otilla Laine left Tuesday for Lake 
Tahoe, to remain for the rest of the month. 

MARYE. — Quite ;i number of their friends were at the train on Saturday 
evening to bid Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye bon voyage and success 
on their continental and beyond-tlie-oeenn trip, which will take them 
to St. Petersburg. 

MacDERMOT.— Mr. and Mrs. Louis MacDermot left this week for Del 
Monte, to lie away for most of August. 

O'BRIEN.— Mrs, w'm. Smith O'Brien and .Mis- Gertt O'Brien de- 
parted this week for Tahoe Tavern. 

it.wsrn. -Mr. and Mrs. A, J. Raiser, and the Misses Etaisch will go to 
Marienw 1, Los i'.:it,is. for most of tlie remainder of the month. 

ROCHE.— Mr. I Mrs. .1. R, Roche, With Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Johnson. 

of Alameda, have motored '" Lake Tahoe, will remain 

three weeks. 

SCHWARTZ, Mrs. Harold .I Schwartz and ,1 > llie have left 

lei their home in Chicago. 
SLACK, -Mrs I'll. Mies Sink mid Miss Edith Slack left Monday for the 

Yellowstone, to l.e gone i"r the next in. mill 

wii.DMAN. - Mis. D. S, Wildman and Mrs >'■ B, Pond left Thuri 

the East. 
WILKINS.— M 1 lira Frank A. Wilkins are at C for the 

month of Am 
WlNSi.i'W Miss Marie Loulsi to Redwood Cits for 

11 lew fll 

INTIMATIONS. 
BLAIR. Mrs. Samuel Hair and Miss Jennie Bli I on the Con- 

tlnent, have oabled friends here that they have given up th.-ir an- 
ticipated visit to Carlsbad. 
CAi.IKi 1RNIANS ABROAD.— Many Callfornlans 

unable t.. return for some time, it being no easy matter to obtain 

■,, ,, nation about Europe, with the trains being US. 

mllltl - Among them arc: Mrs Win. 11. Crocker. Miss 

Qthi 1 ..mi "! William C. Crocker, M*s 

ridge Ertz. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. B. Bourne. 
Mrs Robert Chestei Foul I'oute and Mia 

Wright, .Mis George Willcutt and her son. Dr. WlUcutt, Miss Frances 

Jollltfe, M, Raphael Weill. Dr. Florence Ward. 

Mr and Mrs. E c,em Tools 

tine do Sable. Mr and Mra Oan tl McKnerney. Mrs John 

Thurman De Boldt Mrs. Ph « Arthur Brander, 

vibert Russell. Mrs 1- Mrs. Adorph Spreokels. Mr. 

and Mrs Augustus Schilling, Mil «ary Hunt- 

s Muion Huntington. Mrs, A. P. Hotal - Hn- 



EMMONS, The w line of Ml 

■ u Emu 1 

the coming winter, and will 1 

the si 

Nl '- and 1 months of Jane and 

Jul! ugh i" 

HOPKINS Mi 1 Mrs. Samuel Hopkln ruin at Lake 

Tahoe. 

JONES. Mrs. P. Jones and het y Hill, are now In Nor- 
way, and havi 1 passagi 

United States. 

kohl.- Mi hi. 1 in- Fred rtcl Kohl last week, having 

motored dow 1 mi. n m odge or thi 

i.ainio. Mrs. 1 1: Lalne and r, .Miss otin . 

I bj 1 in ii ootei le is al 1 1 Ta . ei n this 17. 

LILIENTII.M..-- .Mi, and Mrs. i i vi ,i, Lillenthal, Jr., who have re- 
turned from the first part of their honeymoon [1 Hi .1 al the 

Bellevue, had contemplated leai Ing the Hi 1 1 

an extended tour 01 the Buropoan countries, but have post) ed their 

departure indefinitely. 

MILLER.— Mrs. C. O. G. Miller, with her daughter. Miss Christine Miller, 
and niece. Miss Flora Miller, joined a party of their friends at the 
Tavern this week. 

MOORE. — Mrs. George W. Moore and her daughter, Miss Katherlne 
Moore, who have been guests at the Hotel Potter, left last week for 
Del Monte, and will later come to San Francisco for a brief stay. 

PORTER.— Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Porter have come over from : 
to spend a few weeks, during which time they will occupy the home 
in Pacific avenue of Mr. and Mrs. John G. Johnston. 

PRINGLE'.— Mrs. Wm. Bull Pringle is planning a trip to Soutli Carolina 
in the fall. Mrs. Pringle is one of the three Hutchinson sisters, all 
famous for their beauty. Mrs. Bernard Ransome and Mrs. Ernest 
Peixotto are the other two. 

ROONEY. — Miss Therese Rooney will accompany her sister and brother- 
in-law. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Titus, of Piedmont, on a trip to New 
York, where they have leased an estate until after the holidays. They 
will leave within the month. 

SPRECKELS. — While in Paris. Mrs. Spreckels was the guest of her 
cousins, the Marquis and Marquise Robert de Brettville and a great 
uncle. Count de Buffier. 

TEVIS. — The latest cable message from Mrs. Wm. Tevis at Carlsbad 
gives the middle of September as the time for sailing homeward. 

TYSON. — Mr. and Mrs. George H. Tyson, of Alameda, accompanied by 
their daughter. Miss Marie Tyson, and Miss Franc Fierce, of San 
Francisco, are at Shasta Springs for a couple of weeks' stay. The 
Tyson home in Alameda has been closed for some time, but will be 
reopened early In the fall. Miss Tyson is one of the belles in exclu- 
sive circles across the bay, where she spends much of her time. 



"A fellow in New York advertised a sure way to cure 

dyspepsia," said Si Heck; "so I sent the dollar, and what do 
you think I got?" "What did you get?" asked Lem Bing. "A 
card with this printed on it, 'Live on a dime a day and earn it 
yourself,' " replied Si Heck.- — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



"Ma'am, here's a man at the door with a parcel for you." 

"It's a fish, ma'am, and it's marked C. 0. D." "Then make the 
man take it straight back to the dealer. I ordered trout." — Kan- 
sas City Star. 



"And you wouldn't begin a journey on Friday?" "Not 

I." "I can't understand how you can have faith in such a silly 
superstition." "No superstition about it. Saturday's my pay 
day." — Minneapolis Journal. 



For The 

New Fall Styles 
Men's Clothing 

Look in the 
Show Windows of the 

Hastings Clothing Co. 

Post and Grant Avenue 



Ruptured? 

us. Ask your neighbor or your doctor about them. Sold on 



Eventually an HONEST 
JOHN TRUSS. Why not 
now? 3500 of them fit- 
ted in San Francisco by 



30 days trial. 



CLARK GANDION TRUSS CO. 



1 108 Market St. 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 






Great Railroad 
Strike Averted. 



LFlNANCIALy 

The temporary closing of the 
Stock Exchanges Closed, stock exchanges in most of the 

cities of America, due to the Eu- 
ropean war, has necessarily made trading in securities very 
light, and the same thing is for the moment true of the great 
staples. Obviously this condition is merely temporary, and 
must shortly be succeeded by a condition of the highest activ- 
ity, affecting all the markets, for the supplies that will be 
needed in Europe. Henry St. Goar, the local authority on all 
matters pertaining to sugar, states that England is bidding for 
such part of the Cuban sugar crop which remains unsold at the 
moment. The beginning of the European war has apparently 
opened a new era of high prices in the sugar market. Russia, 
Germany and Austria produce a large percentage of the world's 
output, and with agriculture, abandoned in these countries, the 
visible supply is far below normal. The lack of a crop in Rus- 
sia this year will probably result in a shortage of seed for next 
year. The stoppage of exports from Austria and Germany to 
England opens up a profitable field for American producers, 
which will more than offset the disadvantage caused by the re- 
moval of the duty on importations into this country. 



There will be no necessity for the 
No Certificates Here, issue of clearing house certificates 
as a substitute for coin or currency 
in this city. All the local commercial banks are carrying large 
sums of cash at present, and no unusual demand for money has 
been reported on account of the European situation. The 
banks are accommodating their clients with time money at 6 
per cent, the normal bank rate here. 

This is the season when the banks accumulate cash against 
the crop movement, which has just started, and this accounts 
for the large reserves they are carrying. Under normal condi- 
tions the stocks of money would begin to diminish about this 
season and reach a low point about the middle of December; 
but, owing to the temporary stoppage of foreign export busi- 
ness from this port, there is less demand for money than 
usual. 

All the banks are exercising caution in the matter of buying 
European exchange and discounting foreign bills, which is the 
only hazard that could confront them. As this policy has been 
in force for some time, their European balances are now very 
low 

Frank B. Anderson, president of the Bank of California, said 
that at no time in six or seven years had the banks of this 
city been in so strong a position as at present. He added that, 
regardless of war, he expected some method would soon be 
devised to permit of a resumption of merchandise exports from 
this port. 

The principal features of the first 
Pacific Gas & Electric preferred stock of the Pacific Gas 
First Preferred. and Electric Company, now offered 

for subscription, may be summar- 
ized as follows: 1. It is tax free in California and the income 
derived from it is not subject to the normal Federal Income 
Tax. 2. It is issued as fully paid with the express covenant 
of the company that it shall not be subject to assessment for 
any purpose. 3. The stock, after full paid certificates are is- 
sued, carries a dividend rate of $6.00 per share per annum, 
payable at the rate of $1.50 per share every three months by 
check mailed to the stockholder without any action on the 
stockholder's part, except to keep the Secretary of the com- 
pany informed of any change of address. At the price of $82.50 
for each $100 share these dividends represent a net return of 
7.27 per cent per annum on the amount invested. 4. Dividends 
are preferred and cumulative; that is, they must be fully paid 
for the entire period during which the stock has been issued 
before any dividends can be paid on any other stock of the 
company. 5. It is an entirely new issue now offered for the 
first time and containing attractive features not heretofore in- 
corporated in other stock issues of the company. 



It is good news that the colossal 
strike of railroad men on Eastern 
roads has been averted. The rail- 
road managers have shown a most 
conciliatory spirit, and their public statement says: "To avoid 
all possibility that under an arbitration award a reduction in 
pay might be forced upon the men, the railroads proposed that 
the arbitration agreement should give to the men on each road 
the right to elect, after a complete schedule was awarded by 
arbitration, either to adopt the schedule thus awarded, or to 
continue their present schedule." 



The San Francisco Stock and Bond 
Don't Sacrifice Stocks. Exchange has issued a caution to 

investors who might be inclined to 
sacrifice their securities in the belief that the intrinsic value 
has been diminished by the closing of the exchange. Under 
the rules of the exchange, all members, including bank and 
bond house members, are prohibited under liability of expul- 
sion from buying or selling securities, publicly or privately. 
During this condition, curbstone brokers have become active, 
and it is said that some of them are taking advantage of the 
situation to buy securities from uninformed investors at ridicu- 
lous prices. Under the conditions, it would be advisable for 
all who must sell securities at this time to seek advice from 
bankers or other responsible institutions concerning the value 
of their holdings, so that they will not be subjected to loss 
greater than the market necessitates. 



Southern Pacific 
Earnings. 



The Southern Pacific Company has 
reported for June and twelve months 
showing a loss in net revenue for 
the year of $6,512,642. Taking last 
year's income investments and assuming that fixed charges re- 
main unchanged, this would leave approximately $20,300,000 
to cover common dividends, which amount to $16,360,000. In 
other words, the company earned about 7 J /2 per cent on the 
common stock, against a disbursement of 6 per cent. The state- 
ment follows: 

June, 1914 — Increase 

Miles of road 10,474 152 

Gross revenue $11,544,275 -$100,261 

Operating expenses 7,950,527 13,818 

Taxes 563,230 116,038 

Expenses and taxes 8,513,658 129,857 

Net revenue 3,030,619 *230.118 

Year ending June 30th — 

Miles of road 10,421 109 

Gross revenue 133,520,258 *$4 ,254,447 

Operating expenses 93,662,266 792,856 

Taxes 7,162,624 1,465,338 

Expenses and taxes 100,824,891 2,258,195 

Net revenue 37,695,367 *6,512,642 

*Decrease. 

The report of Weils Fargo & Co. to the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission for April and the ten months ended April 
30th last, follows: 1914 — Total operating revenue, $1,309,531; 
decrease, $116,141. Total operating expenses, $1,183,186; de- 
crease, $109,763. Net operating revenue, $126,345; decrease, 
$6,378. Taxes, $35,000; increase, $10,000. Operating income, 
$91,345; decrease, $16,378. From July 1st to April 30th— To- 
tal operating revenue, $13,473,498; decrease, $1,656,637. Total 
operating expenses, $12,234,521; decrease $1,161,792. Net 
operating revenue, $1,238,967; decrease, $464,845. Taxes, 
$333,000; increase, $38,000. Operating income, $905,967; de- 
crease, $502,845. 

Our bank clearings for July aggregated $225,316,649.22 

against $219,174,353.52 in July, 1913. For the week ending 
August 1st, the clearings were $47,076,100.62, against $43,- 
977,968.63 for the corresponding week last year. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Aii, list 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 




dfamueljfl. &2ioi*£nidc/e 



CALIFORNIA AND THE SENATE. 

This State owes it to itself, and to the other States of the 
Union, to send to the United States Senate a man not only of 
the highest standard of public and private honor, but also of 
the highest ability. With the popular election of Senators now 
in force, there are evidences that the people everywhere are 
preparing to send strong men to the Senate. California must 
not be behind the others. 

No man before the public is so well qualified adequately to 
represent California in the upper branch of Congress as Sam- 
uel M. Shortridge. His acknowledged intellectuality, his bril- 
liant and magnetic style, his forensic power and his genius all 
combine to make him a figure that would add luster to this 
State at Washington. 

A career of brilliancy and of great public usefulness will 
open up before Shortridge in the Senate. He is, indeed, an 
ideal selection to fill the position. Naturally endowed with 
great self-possession and ease, with affability, dignity and 
general courtesy, he will have little trouble in appealing per- 
suasively when he addresses the Senate upon any subject. 

Those who have heard him speak — and who in California 
has not? — know that his addresses are marked by clear and 
lucid reasoning. Sentiment, although he delights in it, is al- 
ways subject to reason, and the reasons are in advance of the 
sentiment. It is impossible to point to any of Shortridge's 
serious speeches which are not examples of the eloquence of 
reasoning. Those on the protective policy particularly are in 
the front rank of his admirable fabrics of this description. On 



17 

doqumcT" "" reaS ° ni " e * ** foundati °" *nd body of his 
Shortridge's grasp of the problems of the day is profound 
He recognizes the fact that the supreme business of the states- 
man ls to dtscoyer and then to try to obtain the inauguration 
of such econom.c measures as will secure the greatest degree 
of prosperity for the entire body of the people. This fact he 
expressed in his Lincoln Day address at San Diego as follows 
Uur duty is to favor men and measures that will result in 
prosperity Prosperity comes from labor. Nothing in this 
word can be accomplished without labor. The great thing to 

* }° ma , ke !t P° ss ' bl e for men and women to find empby- 
ment that they may be happy." 

It would be unfortunate for California if a man of lesser 
qualifications ,han Shortridge, with a narrower outlook on the 
problems of the hour, a less striking personality, and a smaller 
gift for public debate, were sent to the United States Senate. 

GREAT EVANGELISTIC CAMPAIGN. 
A vigorous church campaign is under way at the First Baptist 
Church of this city. Last January the church invited Dr 
James Francis of Boston to visit San Francisco and engage in 
an evangelistic campaign under the auspices of the Baptists 
of the city. Dr. Francis is one of the leading pastor evangelists 
of the country, having represented the American Baptist Home 
Mission Society as general evangelist for the United States 
and now serving as pastor of the Clarendon Street Baptist 
Church of Boston, located in a densely populated downtown 
section of that city. The committee has secured Professor B. 
F. Stout of Pasadena to direct the music of the services. Prof 
Stout won the hearts of the people of San Francisco when he 
assisted Gipsy Smith in his remarkable Mission at Pavilion 
Rink two years ago. The great chorus with its hundreds of 
voices responded to his inspiring leadership through those three 
memorable weeks, and was one of the finest musical enterprises 
San Francisco has ever enjoyed. Prof. Stout is a soloist of rare 
winsomeness and power, and will himself sing frequently dur- 
ing the meetings. The choir under his direction will sing many 
of the Gipsy Smith songs. 



Owing to the popularity of the Informal Dances which 

for the past two months have been given weekly at Techau 
Tavern, the management has found it necessary to hold dances 
on Friday evenings as well as Wednesdays. At these informal 
dances there are no dancing contests, but on each occasion 
the management will present to three of the ladies who are 
present costly gifts selected from the art collection of S. & 
G. Gump Company, the well known art dealers, 268 Post street. 
Last Wednesday evening the presentation of these gifts was 
under the direction of Judge Shortall, who is again a candidate 
for the office of Judge of the Superior Court. 



Between July 1, 1913, and June 30, 1914, receipts from 

the National Forests in California amounted to $261,415.44. 
As compared with the previous year, grazing and special uses 
show an increase, while the timber and water power industries 
show a slight falling off. Thirty-five per cent of the receipts 
from the sale of National Forest resources is available in 
California. Of this, twenty-five per cent is paid into the State 
Treasury. 



A well-attended meeting of the Fred M. Hall Business 

Men's Club was held on Thursday night in the assembly room 
of the Hotel Argonaut, where permanent organization was 
effected, and plans were laid for a campaign for the Bakers- 
field man for the close of his canvass for the Democratic 
nomination for Governor. Hall is expected to return in a few 
days from his tour of the Sacramento Valley. 



Associate Justice John E. Richards, candidate for re- 
election, addressed a joint meeting of the Peralta Heights Im- 
provement Club and the Park Boulevard Club of Oakland Fri- 
day evening. The subject of the Judge's address will be "Pub- 
lic Opinion and Political Problems." 

The Frank J. Fallon Club has been organized in the 

27th district to promote his candidacy for Superior Court 
Judge. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 



"llpf 



|.-\ 




By R. R. l'Hommedieu. 

Auto Chamber of Commerce 

The automobile dealers, accessory men and garage men have 
formed a chamber of commerce in San Francisco. These dif- 
ferent interests are now already represented by individual or- 
ganizations, which will continue to exist. The purpose of the 
chamber of commerce is to act as neutral ground on which 
all can come together for the purpose of discussing and formu- 
lating plans for the betterment of the industry in San Francisco. 

At the meeting, J. Marsh was elected chairman, and F. d'At- 
tell, secretary. The executive committee was composed of W. 
L. Hughson, R. K. Roberts and C. N. Weaver, for the auto 
dealers, W. H. Reid, Ed. Mohrig and Robert Weinstock for 
the accessory dealers. For the garage men, W. P. Crowley, C. 

H. Smith, Sr., and M. Schroder. 

* » * 

Stevens Creek Road 

If the residents on the Stevens Creek road are successful in 
their efforts to get the Santa Clara County Supervisors to put 
the Stevens Creek Road to the Big Basin in shape, hundreds 
of motorists can avail themselves of the opportunity of driv- 
ing through some of California's most beautiful country. 

It is safe to say that in no section of California can the sce- 
nic attractions surpass this interesting bit of country — that is, 
taking into consideration that the nature of its beauty is purely 
pastoral. Through Santa Clara County's loveliest orchard 
country, past farm and vineyard, through sleepy villages, on 
and up into the blue, shadowy foothills, a party of automo- 
bilists sped along until the winding roads took them into the 
very heart of the foothill district, and the valley was lost to 
view. 

At about 3 o'clock the route farm was reached, and the party 
made haste to try their hands at the game of trout fishing. Ow- 
ing to the last two dry years, the fish were noticeable mostly 
by their absence in the tanks here. There are 200,000 baby 
trout which will be ready for the sportsman and the Los An- 
geles and San Francisco markets next April. 

The country is ideal for camping and outings, and many 
motorists avail themselves of the natural advantages to run up 
there on Sundays to spend the days. From the route farm it 
is only about six miles to the junction of the summit road, and 
the Big Basin country, but owing to the dangerous condition of 
this stretch of road from the trout farm on, it is not used by 
motorists. 

An effort is being made by the residents of this section to get 
the Santa Clara Supervisors to put this piece of road into good 
condition, thereby making the run from all parts of the bay 
cities via Mountain View perfectly safe for travel. If this 
were done, a great deal of the motor travel to Santa Clara, 
the Big Basin and adjacent country would be diverted to the 
Stevens' Creek route, as it is interesting from a scenic stand- 
point, and not difficult to travel over. 

* * * 

Auto Bests Bullocks 

Business circles in India are manifesting increasing interest 
in the possibility of making extensve use of motor trucks, vans 
or lorries for purposes of commercial transport over short dis- 
tances where slow-going bullock cars are now mostly used. 

Although it has been a common belief in India that the 
bullock carts mode of transport is the cheapest possible under 
the circumstances, yet lately experiments with motor trucks 
have shown that motor transport is really a much cheaper 
means of meeting the necessities of trade. For instance, in 
Bombay, where a vast amount of cotton has to be handled every 
year, it is a common sight to see on the streets a string of 



about 300 bullock carts, each drawn by two oxen and loaded 
with three or four bales of cotton. Taking four bales as a 
maximum load, it is obvious that it requires 30 men, 30 carts 
and 60 bullocks to remove 120 bales of cotton, and it takes 
them one hour to cover 3 miles, the approximate cost being 
$9.73 for the trip. The same number of bales could be carried 
in five motor lorries, at a cost of $1.60 per car, or $8 in all, and 
the time occupied would be IS minutes. Besides this saving in 
time and in cost of transport, there also would be a great 
saving in wages. Allowing a driver and one assistant for each 
commercial motor vehicle, it would be necessary to pay the 
wages of only 10 men for a quarter of an hour, instead of 30 
men for a full hour, thus adding at least another $1.60 to the 
economic advantage possessed by the motor vehicle over the 
bullock for transport purposes. 

Moreover, it is now recognized in India that there is a great 
field for motor transport in connection with railways. There are 
many small towns in India where the cost of laying down a 
railway is out of all proportion to the immediate return that 
is likely to be received for the expenditure. For distances 
up to 100 miles, and loads up to 5 tons, it can easily be seen 
that an enormous economy in time and in expenditure would 
result from the use of motor traction. The units being so much 
smaller than those of a freight train, there would be a minimum 
of difficulty in regularly finding full loads for the vehicles, and 
a properly organized system could be so arranged that the 
running of unladen vehicles on the return journey would be 

reduced to a minimum. 

* * * 

Three In One 

The new design for seating three passengers in a small auto- 
mobile or cyclecar is shown by an English firm. The front 
seats are of the semibucket type with sufficient space between 
them to permit easy entrance to the rear seat, which is intended 
for only one person. When the hood is raised it covers all 

seats. 

* * * 

Cast-Steel Wheels 

The making of a cast-steel truck wheel that will have both 
the strength and resiliency required for the severe service to 
which such vehicles are subjected is a difficult matter owing 
to the unavoidable weakness of castings of all kinds at the 
junction of the rim and spokes. This weakness is apparently 
overcome in a new type of wheel recently placed on the market. 
The rim of this wheel is of a channel section, while the spokes 
are hollow and have sides curved in such a way as to join the 
rim without a sudden change in direction. This wheel is some- 
what lighter than a wood wheel of the same carrying capacity. 

* * * 

Loading Bricks 

From Germany comes an ingenious method of loading brick 
from kiln to motor truck without handling individual brick, 
thus saving breakage. A low wall separates the truck from the 
track upon which the car from the kiln is run. A mechanically 
operated rammer at the same level as the top of the wall, 
which is also the level of the car platform and the floor of the 
truck, pushes the load of brick from the car across the wall, 

directly upon the truck. 

* * * 

New Confetti Car 

By contrast with the familiar confetti car of American en- 
durance run memory, the method of marking the recent light car 
trials of the Royal Automobile Club was modern and highly 
scientific. The pathfinder was equipped with a special tank 
having an outlet near the ground between the hind wheels and 
a control valve within easy reach. At every point that re- 
quired marking the valve was opened and the direction of the 
course painted on the road with violet dye. 

* * » 

Golf by Auto Light 

Golf enthusiasts begrudge every hour after sunset which 
keeps them from their favorite sport. An idea which originated 
in England and has been adopted by some American golfers 
involves the use of the headlights of motor cars, by which the 
links are illuminated. Four electric headlights are used, two 
being focused on the ball and two on the line of stroke. The 
course is easily seen for 150 yards, and little trouble is ex- 



August 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



perienced from lost balls, except in case of badly "slicked" 
or "pulled" drives. 

* * * 

Wind Resistance 

The solution of the problem of wind resistance in the con- 
struction of racing cars depends largely upon the person 
equation. An Englishman, interested in seeing just how far he 
could go in restricting air friction, recently experimented with 
a model which presented very little surface to the wind. His 
radiator is extremely narrow, almost sharp, and combines with 
the engine hood wedgewise, being only wide enough at the 
rear to shield his body from the impact of the rush of air. The 
wheels which are solid, are of standard gauge, the narrow 
radiator jutting up from a platform on the chassis. 

* • * 

Motor Truck Club 

To assist motor truck owners in securing better service from 
their drivers, the Motor Truck Club of America has embarked 
on a campaign in which each of its members is being asked to 
turn himself into a reporter of truck abuse. Post cards have 
been given to the members bearing space for the license 
number and details of the driver's offense. One of these is to 
be filled out each time a member observes a truck being care- 
lessly or recklessly operated, and mailed to the club. The 
club in turn will take care to see that the owner of the truck 
is notified of the driver's dereliction. 



em makers of motor cars to apply for space at the Panama-Pa- 
cific Exposition, and after a tour of inspection of the fair 
grounds, Jeffery stated that the Exposition was much larger 
and even more interesting than he had anticipated. 

* * * 
Lee Tires 

"Recently the world's twenty-five mile record for a dirt 
track was broken in Portland," says Henry D. McCoy, of 
Chanslor & Lyon Company, agents for the Lee tires. 

"One of the winning factors of this record breaking event was 
the Lee tire equipment. E. J. Romana, of Seattle, who owns 
the winning car, has written the following letter to the Chans- 
lor & Lyon Company : 

"We wish to take this opportunity to let you know how 
pleased we are with Lee tires on our Romana racing car. The 
tires were used in the races at Portland, Oregon; Vancouver, 
B. C, and Tacoma, Wash., and had been run approximately one 
thousand miles before we entered the races at Portland, Ore., 
for the second time on July 10th and 11th. 

" 'On July 11th the world's 25 mile dirt track record on a 
one-mile track was broken. Our Ramona car, equipped with 
Lee tires, made the twenty-five miles in 22 minutes 7 seconds. 

"'We wish this to go on record that: After the greweling 
test we have given the Lee tires they are still on the car, and 
it would take an expert to tell that they had been run more than 
a hundred miles.' " 



Good Roads In Santo Domingo 

The carretera or boulevard from Santa Domingo to San Cris- 
tobal is now completed, and inauguration ceremonies were held 
recently. The department of Public Works of the Dominican 
Republic plans to continue this boulevard from San Cristobal to 
Bani, and the first stone in this new road was laid at the inau- 
guration ceremonies. The same department is still working 
on the new boulevard to run from Santo Domingo in the direc- 
tion of Bani, and work has been begun by Jose Turull on his 
contract for the completion of the Malecon in Santo Domingo. 

• * * 

Some Registration 

The latest motor vehicle registration figures as issued by the 
Secretary of State are as follows: Automobiles, 108,024; motor- 
cycles, 22,803; chauffeurs, 15,496; State Treasurer's receipts, 

$1,262,428.26. 

• * * 

Registration Fee Cut 

Regarding the registration of motor vehicles, W. R. Ormsby, 
superintendent of the Motor Vehicle Division, recently made 
the following statement: "The attention of the public is called 
by the motor vehicle division to the fact that, beginning with 
August 1st and terminating with December 31st, the fees for 
the registration of automobiles will be one-half the regular fee, 
and also the fees for registration as dealers in automobiles or 
motorcycles will be one-half the regular fees, while the fees 
for the registration of motorcycles by owners remains the same, 
$2.00. Also fees for chauffeurs' licenses remain the same, $2. 

• • • 

Charles T. Jeffery Visits Coast 

Charles T. Jeffery, the head of Thomas B. Jeffery Company, 
is visiting San Francisco for the first time. Jeffery has made a 
flying trip westward to look over the coast trade. In speak- 
ing of the automobile conditions, the Jeffery manufacturer 
said: 

"There is no depression in the automobile industry. Most 
of the prominent manufacturers have had a good season. The 
Jeffery factory has had the best season in its history. We are 
featuring a new type six-cylinder car for the 1915 season. This 
model will be known as the Chesterfield six, and will have 
the greatest number of European improvements that were ever 
incorporated in an American made car. The demand for light 
weight cars has demonstrated the success of our design, and 
we will continue to feature this type of car. Another factor 
that is proving of unusual importance in our plans is the pro- 
duction of the four wheel drive Jeffery truck. This machine 
has made the greatest step ever made in the advance of motor 
truck design, and promises to play a very big part in the motor 
truck industry of the future." 

The Jeffery Company was one of the first of the large East- 



New Kissel-Kar 

The new Kissel-Kar "36" which has just made its appear- 
ance, features something entirely new in the shape of a detach- 
able Sedan top for winter use. This detachable top is a 
logical evolution of the successful two door body design intro- 
duced by the Kissels with the Series B 48-"Six," and it is now 
announced that this body will be optional to purchasers of any 
Kissel-Kar model for the 1915 season. 

The top fits snugly and perfectly over the touring body, and 
is so simple in construction that two inexpert men can make 
the changes with a screw driver and a wrench. Six bolts and 
sockets, three on either side, and four top irons, one at each 
corner, are the only fastenings, and these are neatly hidden un- 
der the leather lining. The electric wiring connects automati- 
cally, as the upper and lower halves meet. To convert the tour- 
ing car, it is necessary to remove only the windshield, summer 
top and moulding, then to screw a metal plate over the door 

latches. 

« * • 

Richard Ward Visits Coast 

Richard Ward, secretary and treasurer of the Federal Rub- 
ber Manufacturing Company of Milwaukee, builders of the 
Federal tires, is on his initial visit to the coast. Ward, in dis- 
cussing the future tire outlook, offered the opinion that while 
to-day cultivated rubber is the greatest factor in the price of 
tires, there are chances that the cost of tires is likely to ad- 
vance, inasmuch as England is now at war, and that country 
controls the cultivated rubber market. Ward will spend sev- 
eral weeks in San Francisco. 

• • • 

Empire Announcement for 1916 

Increased production, continuation of the one chassis policy, 
marked reduction in price and introduction of a new type in an 
electrically started and lighted streamline touring car, selling 
for less than one thousand dollars, are striking features of the 
1915 program of the Empire Automobile Company, as an- 
nounced this week. This gives the company a line of three 
distinct cars for the year, a roadster being carried with the two 
touring cars. The announcement is noteworthy as an indica- 
tion of the Empire's steady advance along the lines laid down 
at the time of the company's foundation and steadfastly fol- 
lowed since that time. Lower price, the reduction this year 
being fifty dollars for an improved car, has become character- 
istic of the annual announcement, a practice made possible by 
adherence to the one chassis plan. 

"Wealth is very haughty and overbearing in this coun- 
try." "Not always. Did you ever watch the owner of a sixty 
horse-power automobile trying to square himself with a bicycle 
policeman?"— Washington Star. 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



August 8, 1914. 



Good Road to Big Basin 

"Few motorists appreciate or know the pleasures of motoring 
to the Big Basin in the Santa Cruz Mountains," says J. W. 
Leavitt, of J. W. Leavitt & Company, agents for the Overland 
cars. "Last week, Manager A. D. Plughoff and myself made 
the run to the Big Basin in four and a quarter hours, arriving 
at the Redwood Inn at 7 p. m. in time for dinner. This was 
beating it through, and for those who are not familiar with 
mountain touring would be too fast a gait; it will consume be- 
tween five and six hours under normal conditions. 

"The best route to take at the present time from San Fran- 
cisco is down the peninsula over the El Camino Real to the 
Saratoga road just below Mountain View. From Saratoga the 
road through the town past Congress Springs is followed to 
what is known as the Saratoga Summit. One finds three roads 
just at the summit. The one to be followed is the center one, 
which is marked 'To Santa Cruz.' This leads to Boulder Creek. 
While this road has many sharp turns, and is quite narrow, yet 
it is a safe road, quite smooth and easily driven even by a 
beginner, if care is taken. 

"Of the distance between the Summit and Boulder Creek 
seven miles of the going is a coast down hill through some of 
the prettiest mountain country in California. It has this regu- 
lar Alps effect, and is much different from the ordinary moun- 
tain scenery. 

"From Boulder Creek it is a run of twelve miles into the Big 
Basin over a splendid, well kept road that tops one range be- 
fore reaching the government reserve. The distance from San 
Francisco to the Big Basin by this route is eighty-two miles. At 
the Big Basin we were surprised to find that they had estab- 
lished what is called the Redwood Inn, where meals and ac- 
commodations may be had. 

"We slept in what might be called a shack or a half -boarded 
tent. The boards come up to about one's chin, then there is 
an opening of about three feet, over which is constructed the 
roof. Plenty of free air, with all the pleasures of sleeping in 
the open, yet with the comfort of privacy. While the after- 
noon had been quite warm, we found before morning that in 
this deep forest it became as cold as some of the coldest days 
in the city. 

"After dinner each night they build a big camp fire around 
which the tourists while away the fading hours of evening tell- 
ing stories, cracking jokes and singing songs. 

"The return trip was made over Bear Creek road to Los 
Gatos. This is a most interesting drive, but, however, is one 
that can only be negotiated by small cars with safety. The 
season motorist who is looking for some interesting touring 
can take this road. At the present time it is quite dusty and 
steep up to Tevis. 

"After retracing the course to Boulder Creek one travels on 
about ten miles, until they reach a school house. At this point 
they take the road that turns to the left. It is a short, narrow 
road that leads on to what is known as the twenty-seven mile 
scenic drive, which runs along the summit of the mountain. 
The road is fair, and can be easily taken by small wheelbase 
cars. When within three miles of Saratoga Summit, one comes 
upon what is known as Castle Rock. This rock is honey- 
combed with caves, and shows conclusively in its appearance 
that at one time it was at the bottom of the ocean, but now 
stands 3,600 feet above sea level. The rock will pay any one 
to stop and investigate. From Castle Rock one follows the 
regular Saratoga road to the El Camino Real, thence to San 
Francisco. Distance by this route, ninety-two miles." 



TIRES 



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Garage Phone— Main Line, Franklin 224 

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have Safety --and you can have Speed. 
Truffault-Hartford Shock Absorbers give you 
asphalt-ease wherever you go. Absolutely 
prevent crystallization and breaking of springs 
and axles. Permit a safe increase in speed. 
Effect constant and conspicuous economies in 

tires, engine and body repairs. Cut 

depreciation in half. 

The Truffault-Hartford is the only shock 
absorber constructed on the right and proven 
principle of fractional resistance. This fact has 
resulted in its being made standard equipment 
on twenty-five of the country's leading cars. 
Send for Catalog today. Four models, $16, 
&3S, tSO, »60. Can be fitted to any car. 
Fit them to yours. 




nsiil Upon Truffault-Hartfords on Your New Car 

HARTFORD SUSPENSION CO. 

EDWARD V. HARTFORD. Pes. 
Office and Works: 174 Bay St., Jersey City, N. J. 

Manufacturers of Hartford Electric 
Starting and Lighting System 

DISTRIBUTORS 

CHANSLOR & LYON CO. 



Portland 
Oakland 
191 1BI ]H| ]■' Los Angeles 
ID! O lal \r Seattle 




Aucust 8, 1914. 



and California Advertiser 



21 






Roberts Speaks of Oakland Company 

R. K Roberts, who assumed the duties of Assistant General 
bales Manager of the Oakland Motor Car Company, of Michi- 
gan, in charge of the Pacific Coast, with headquarters in San 
Francisco, on the first of the month, has the following to say 
with reference to the new life taken on in the big factory at 
Pontiac, Michigan: 

"The Oakland Motor Car Company has been reclaimed by 
the General Motors Company, which also owns the Buick, 
Cadillac and other companies, and it has been reorganized and 
reconstructed from end to end. It now has behind it the strong- 
est organization, financially and otherwise, that has ever been 
created in automobile history. The Oakland Motor Car Com- 
pany now has at its head as its General Manager, Charles W. 
Nash, who long ago stood at the top as a manufacturer of 
horse-drawn vehicles, and who has since the advent of the 
motor car become the greatest individual figure in that indus- 
try. He stands to-day without a peer as a successful producer 
of automobiles, both as to volume and from the stand-point of 
the greatest value at a minimum cost. He is a man of the most 
scrupulous integrity, possessing a character and personality 
one seldom sees. His word is accepted without reserve by 
those who know him, and by the trade the name 'Charley 
Nash' is almost revered. 

"At the head of its sales department, the Oakland Motor 
Car Company now has Fred W. Harner, who has risen to the 
topmost pinnacle by his honest, straight-forward business deal- 
ings, his rare business judgment, ability and devotion to the 
principles of his convictions. No stronger, nor more brilliant 
man has been developed in the automobile industry, and his 
connection as General Sales Manager of the Oakland Motor 
Car Company insures a wise and safe administration of the 
company's affairs, and a liberal, straightforward and just policy 
toward those with whom the company has dealings. 

"Henceforth, under the new regime, the Oakland car will 
be of such a high standard of construction and advanced ideas 
in design, that it will instantly assume a position in the front 
rank of public favor, and it was my appreciation of this fact 
that will surely be borne out by future developments, that con- 
trolled my action in becoming identified with this new and 
energetic organization." 

« * » 

New Bulcks Here 

_ Samples of all the new 1915 Buicks will soon be on exhibi- 
tion at the Howard Auto Company's salesrooms at the present 
rate. Last week the announcement of the first 1915 Buick, the 
025 small touring car, was made. This week, samples of the 
024 small roadster and the 037 large four-cylinder touring car 
have arrived, and are one of the chief attractions on the upper 
row. Having been facing a shortage of the 1914 models for 
the last couple of months, the local Buick dealers are now tak- 
ing orders for the new 1915 line, with promises of early de- 
liveries. 

• • • 

Henderson Now at Los Angeles 

O. B. Henderson, for many years general sales manager of 
the Baker Electric Vehicle Company of Cleveland, has be- 
come vice-president of the Pacific Kissel-Kar branch, with 
headquarters at Los Angeles. Mr. Henderson's ripened experi- 
ence, engaging personality and wide acquaintance should fur- 
ther strengthen the Kissel-Kar organization's already great 
prestige on the Western coast, where it handles Sord cars and 
Baker electrics, as well as Kissel-Kars. It is the largest auto- 
mobile company in the West, being capitalized at $500,000,000. 



MACHINE WORK 
BLACKSMITHING 
GEAR CUTTING 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

AND STARTING 
SYSTEMS INSTALLED 



PHONE FRANKLIN 5433 



J. J. SCHNERR 

ALL MAKES OF AUTOMOBILES REPAIRED 



BRAZING AND WELDING OF ALUMINUM. 

BRASS AND CAST IRON 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



ED. F. HENDRICKS 
Manager 



774-780 Golden Gate Ave. 
At Gough St.. San Francisco 



ST. FRANCIS GARAGE 

FRANCIS BROS., Managers 
NEW ABSOLUTELY FIRE-PROOF GARAGE 



PHONE 
PROSPECT 191S 



1120 POST STREET 
Near Van Ness Avenue 



AUTOMOBILES AND TOURISTS' BAGGAGE 

INSURED AGAINST 

Fire, Theft and Transportation 

While anywhere In United States. Canada and Europe 



/ETNA INSURANCE CO. 



PACIFIC BRANCH 



OF HARTFORD 
- 301 California Street 
Telephone Sutter 3010 



S